SUISA Songwriting Camp 2019 now open for applications by SUISA members | plus video

The third SUISA Songwriting Camp shall take place between 24 and 26 June 2019 in the Powerplay Studios in Maur near Zurich. SUISA members may exclusively apply for a participation. The event, jointly organised between SUISA and Pele Loriano Productions, has already spawned several internationally successful pop songs. “She Got Me”, sung and co-written by Luca Hänni, was the second song in a row selected from the SUISA Songwriting Camp to represent Switzerland at the ESC. Text and video by Manu Leuenberger

With the SUISA Songwriting Camp, SUISA offers some of its members the opportunity to team up and compose pop songs with internationally renowned producers and songwriters. Swiss Duo Aliose participated in the most recent SUISA Songwriting Camp. The two SUISA members explain in the video how they perceived their participation.

Those who wish to participate in the Songwriting Camp need to have well-founded musical knowledge, be able to produce high-level creative output when pressed for time and be open for criticism and an exchange with their co-writers.

The challenging task is: To write a pop song in a team which consists of three to five persons within a day, according to certain specifications – you start with a blank sheet of paper in the morning and don’t finish until you have completed a demo track by the evening.

Pop songs with hit potential

The musical style of the songs can comprise all facets of temporary pop music, which could also be successful in the charts, on streaming platforms or on radio/TV. The songs are intended to be offered to publishers and artists on the one hand, and also be suitable for the Eurovision Song Contest on the other hand.

36 music creators from Switzerland and other countries had taken part in the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018. Of the 19 songs which were written during last year’s instalment of the event, two compositions have meanwhile reached international fame: The works “She Got Me” and “Sister” will feature in the final round of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019 in Tel Aviv for Switzerland and Germany, respectively.

Applications for the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2019

The third SUISA Songwriting Camp shall take place between 24 and 26 June 2019 in the Powerplay Studios in Maur near Zurich. The event is jointly organised by SUISA and Pele Loriano Productions. Pele Loriano Productions is responsible for the artistic direction of the Songwriting Camp on behalf of SUISA.

SUISA members can now apply to take part in the SUISA Songwriter Camp 2019. Are you a producer, songwriter (topliner), or a lyricist and do you think you can fulfil the requirements regarding musical skills and abilities? In that case, please send us your application which should contain the following:

  • a short biography;
  • meaningful reference songs (mp3 files or internet links);
  • contact details.

Please e-mail the applications to the following address: songwritingcamp (at) suisa (dot) ch
Closing date for applications: Monday, 22 April 2019

Important: Participants’ spaces are only allocated to SUISA members by way of this application process. Those who apply should be able to guarantee that they are available to participate on one or all of the event days (24 to 26 June 2019).

Dates and selection of the participants

The selection of all artists who are invited to the camp shall be done via the artistic director. A suitable mix of participants is paramount for the creative success of the songwriting sessions.

The artistic programme director will directly communicate any acceptance messages and invitations as well as further details on the participation at the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2019 by 31 May 2019.

Rejection letters will not be sent. If you have not received an acceptance message by 31 May 2019 you were not taken into consideration for the Songwriting Camp 2019.

The number of applications is expected to exceed the number of available participants’ spaces by far. Please note that, at no time whatsoever, any claims arise to a participation in the event by sending in an application. There will also not be any correspondence in relation to the actual allocation of spaces. It is not possible to comment on any further Songwriting Camps supported by SUISA at this stage.

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Eurovision Song Contest: SUISA Songwriting Camp song in the German qualifierEurovision Song Contest: SUISA Songwriting Camp song in the German qualifier | plus video Success for the SUISA Songwriting Camp: The song “Sister” created during last year’s camp is in the German ESC qualifier. The piece was composed and produced by an international songwriting team consisting of Marine Kaltenbacher, Laurell Barker, Tom Oehler and Thomas Stengaard. Read more
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  1. Busseniers says:

    J ai eu la chance d avoir un feedback de Jeroen Swinnen, le belge, ce qui m a permis de bien evoluer
    C est egalement , a Jeroen Swinnen, que j ai achete le digidesign pro tools ,
    Merveilleux engin
    Bonne journee a Vous
    Christian Busseniers

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The third SUISA Songwriting Camp shall take place between 24 and 26 June 2019 in the Powerplay Studios in Maur near Zurich. SUISA members may exclusively apply for a participation. The event, jointly organised between SUISA and Pele Loriano Productions, has already spawned several internationally successful pop songs. “She Got Me”, sung and co-written by Luca Hänni, was the second song in a row selected from the SUISA Songwriting Camp to represent Switzerland at the ESC. Text and video by Manu Leuenberger

With the SUISA Songwriting Camp, SUISA offers some of its members the opportunity to team up and compose pop songs with internationally renowned producers and songwriters. Swiss Duo Aliose participated in the most recent SUISA Songwriting Camp. The two SUISA members explain in the video how they perceived their participation.

Those...read more

Switzerland will be represented at the Eurovision Song Contest by Luca Hänni and a song from the SUISA Songwriting Camp | plus video

For the second time in succession, the Swiss entry for the Eurovision Song Contest has come from the SUISA Songwriting Camp. The song “She Got Me” was written last June at the Powerplay Studios by SUISA member Luca Hänni with Canadian songwriters Laurell Barker and Frazer Mac as well as Swedish producer Jon Hällgren. Text and video by Sibylle Roth

The song “She Got Me”, which had the working title of “Dirty Dancing”, was written during the SUISA Songwriting Camp in June 2018 by a four-person team. With Germany taking another song – “Sister” – from the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018 to the Eurovision Song Contest in Tel Aviv, this represents another major success for the songwriting camp, staged by SUISA in collaboration with Pele Loriano Productions.

“It’s fantastic”, says Luca Hänni, a SUISA member since 2015. The Bern native was first exposed to the broader public in a German casting show in 2012. Since then, he has issued four albums and a number of singles, and recently appeared on stage with Helene Fischer. Eurovision is the next big adventure in his career. Hänni says he’s excited, “and I just want to give the best show possible.”

Last year, Luca Hänni took part in the SUISA Songwriting Camp for the first time, with Canadian songwriters Laurell Barker and Frazer Mac returning for a second time. For Laurell Barker, the Swiss camp is a real success story; she contributed to Switzerland’s Eurovision entry last year as well. She wrote the song “Stones” with ZiBBZ, which is made up of SUISA members Corinne and Stefan Gfeller. Jon Hällgren, the Swedish producer, completes the songwriting quartet. After the camp, he produced “She Got Me” for Eurovision 2019 in collaboration with his son Lukas Hällgren.

This year, Swiss broadcaster SRF left the decision on the Eurovision entry to an international jury of 20 experts and a 100-strong viewer panel in a multiple-stage process. Over 420 songs were entered.

On 16 May 2019 (SRF zwei at 9:00 pm), Switzerland will be battling for a place in the Eurovision Song Contest final in Tel Aviv. The Eurovision final will take place on 18 May 2019 (SRF 1 at 8:00 pm).

The SUISA Songwriting Camp took place in June 2018 for the second time. Overall, 36 musicians from eight countries took part in the three-day event in Powerplay Studios, Maur. This resulted in 19 pop songs in a range of styles. The camp was staged by Pele Loriano Productions and SUISA.

www.lucamusic.ch

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For the second time in succession, the Swiss entry for the Eurovision Song Contest has come from the SUISA Songwriting Camp. The song “She Got Me” was written last June at the Powerplay Studios by SUISA member Luca Hänni with Canadian songwriters Laurell Barker and Frazer Mac as well as Swedish producer Jon Hällgren. Text and video by Sibylle Roth

The song “She Got Me”, which had the working title of “Dirty Dancing”, was written during the SUISA Songwriting Camp in June 2018 by a four-person team. With Germany taking another song – “Sister” – from the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018 to the Eurovision Song Contest in Tel Aviv, this represents another major success for the songwriting camp, staged by SUISA in collaboration with Pele Loriano Productions.

“It’s fantastic”, says Luca Hänni, a...read more

M4music: Hit the World – this is how international female hit composers did it

Have you ever wondered how hits are created? How a song comes into existence which lets the feet across generations tap to the rhythm? SUISA has been researching these questions and is organising a panel on this topic at the M4music 2019. Text by Erika Weibel

M4music: Hit the World – this is how international female hit composers did it

At the M4music Festival 2019, KT Gorique and Valeska Steiner (top, from left to right) exchange their views on songwriting with Laurell Barker and Shelly Peiken (below, from left to right). (Photos: Jeremie Carron, Christoph Köstlin, Phantasm, Aerin Moreno)

There are female and male songwriters who create their songs entirely by themselves, others, however, write as a team. Sometimes they write for themselves, sometimes they write for performers fromr completely different music genres. How do they go about it? Do female and male composers have a feeling whether something becomes a hit? Can you live off songwriting?

SUISA panel Hit the World – four female songwriters tell their stories

On Friday, 15 March 2019, SUISA is going to organise a round of female experts which is going to discuss exactly those issues at the M4music Festival. For this purpose, SUISA invited four female songwriters who have already celebrated international and national successes in the pop and urban sector.

One participant is writing hits, among others, for Miley Cyrus, Céline Dion, Selena Gomez, Meredith Brooks or Christina Aguilera. The second has contributed to several hundred songs and travels across continents from one songwriting session to the next. The third is a successful Swiss singer songwriter who has a large and loyal fan community. The fourth in the round is currently writing Swiss hip hop history: In 2012, the then 21-year-old won the first freestyle rap world championship in New York. She writes lyrics as well as the beats herself and has been touring successfully in Europe and overseas for several years.

The four songwriters Valeska Steiner, KT Gorique, Laurell Barker and Shelly Peiken are going to answer questions regarding the writing process of successful songs and exchange their experience what their approach to composing their songs is. What matters in their opinion. How they master the challenges that automatically come with the territory.

SUISA-Panel at the M4music: Hit the World – four female songwriters tell their stories
Friday, 15 March 2019, 15:00 – 16:15, Matchbox

Speakers:
Valeska Steiner, musician, BOY, Zurich
KT Gorique, musician, Sion
Laurell Barker, musician, Vancouver/Zurich
Shelly Peiken, musician, Los Angeles

Presentation:
Nina Havel, Zurich

www.m4music.ch

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Have you ever wondered how hits are created? How a song comes into existence which lets the feet across generations tap to the rhythm? SUISA has been researching these questions and is organising a panel on this topic at the M4music 2019. Text by Erika Weibel

M4music: Hit the World – this is how international female hit composers did it

At the M4music Festival 2019, KT Gorique and Valeska Steiner (top, from left to right) exchange their views on songwriting with Laurell Barker and Shelly Peiken (below, from left to right). (Photos: Jeremie Carron, Christoph Köstlin, Phantasm, Aerin Moreno)

There are female and male songwriters who create their songs entirely by themselves, others, however, write as a team. Sometimes they write for themselves, sometimes they write for performers fromr completely different music genres. How do they go about it? Do female and male composers have a feeling...read more

SUISA makes music possible

A new mission statement, a new organisation chart! Fairness, dedication and passion – these three concepts make up SUISA’s new mission statement. “SUISA makes music possible” is at the centre of the new mission statement. The same principle has been applied to SUISA’s new organisation chart. By Irène Philipp Ziebold, COO

SUISA makes music possible

SUISA makes music possible as a mediator between the interests of music creators and music users. (Illustration: Zusammenspiel)

Fair dealings when it comes to artists’ creations, dedication regarding mediation between the interests of music creators and users as well as passion for SUISA staff for their daily work. SUISA’s new mission statement has the motto “SUISA makes music possible” at the centre. This principle is also the foundation of the new organisation chart of SUISA which has been in force since January 2019.

New organisation chart

The new organisation is more strongly oriented in processes than before. This shall ensure that music creators receive the best possible remuneration for the use of their music. The objective of the reviewed organisation chart is to further optimise SUISA’s internal process efficiencies. The main process – licensing and distributing – is now combined in one department under a joint roof.

SUISA’s organisational structure will continue to be split into three departments. The responsibility of the core process shall rest with the new department “Operations”. Add to that the department “Regulations” for legal prerequisites and international work documentation as well as the department “Services” for all cross-sectional services, especially IT, Finance, HR and Public Relations.

The competences and responsibilities are thus also increasingly bundled at Executive Committee level. The responsibility for the licensing of the various music usages and, consequently, the distribution of the respective copyright royalties thus lies with one person. This way, complex interfaces can be avoided and tighter processes will be created. The objective remains that we tackle all future developments in the interest of our members and never forget to offer an efficient but also top-quality service.

New mission statement

In order to function in a (new) organisation, framework conditions must be set in the company. The purpose of a mission statement are to define any signposts within which company strategy shall be fulfilled. The mission statement is also intended to demonstrate what the purpose of a company is, to reflect its identity and to show what image is intended. Last but not least, the mission statement (PDF, in German) is meant to be an informational guideline for all staff and act as a motivator for them. Another aim is to illustrate and reflect the diversity and reality of the various staff members and SUISA target groups.

The previous SUISA mission statement was created at the end of the nineties. It thus no longer reflects today’s reality for SUISA and its environment and did no longer fulfil the above mentioned expectations. SUISA’s Executive Committee has therefore commissioned the creation of a new mission statement at the beginning of 2017. The new mission statement was worked on during a half-year period by a working group consisting of 14 SUISA staff members and two external experts. Staff members of all genders, age groups and hierarchical rankings as well as from all three SUISA locations took part.

Fairness, dedication and passion – these three concepts make up SUISA’s new mission statement. With the optimised organisational structure onto which the new organisation chart is based, we are equipped and ready and work intensively on the implementation of the new motto: SUISA makes music possible!

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A new mission statement, a new organisation chart! Fairness, dedication and passion – these three concepts make up SUISA’s new mission statement. “SUISA makes music possible” is at the centre of the new mission statement. The same principle has been applied to SUISA’s new organisation chart. By Irène Philipp Ziebold, COO

SUISA makes music possible

SUISA makes music possible as a mediator between the interests of music creators and music users. (Illustration: Zusammenspiel)

Fair dealings when it comes to artists’ creations, dedication regarding mediation between the interests of music creators and users as well as passion for SUISA staff for their daily work. SUISA’s new mission statement has the motto “SUISA makes music possible” at the centre. This principle is also the foundation of the new organisation chart of SUISA which has been in force since January...read more

Copyright law revision: compromise is the key to success – no exceptions for hotel rooms

The revision of the existing Copyright Act is entering the decisive phase this year. After seven years’ preparatory work, parliamentary debates have now started. The revised act could come into force on 1.1.2020 if both federal houses respect the delicate compromise. Text by Andreas Wegelin

Copyright law revision: compromise is the key to success – no exceptions for hotel rooms

The jurisprudence in Switzerland and Europe is clear: when a hotel receives radio or television broadcasts and retransmits them into its guest rooms, it is a use which is relevant for copyright purposes. (Photo: Piovesempre / iStock)

The long road to a minor partial revision started nine years’ ago: in 2010, State Councillor Géraldine Savary asked the Federal Council to propose solutions to prevent the use of illegal online offers. The Federal Council rejected the request arguing that authors could simply give more concerts to make up for the loss in earnings caused by the slump in CD sales. This answer outraged musicians, and rightly so: not all composers can perform their own works.

In summer 2012, Federal Councillor Sommaruga responded to the protests by creating a working group to prepare proposals for the revision of the Copyright Act. AGUR12, as the working group was called, submitted its recommendations in December 2013. Based on those recommendations and on a wealth of additional unacceptable proposals, the Federal Council produced a preliminary bill in 2015 which met with widespread criticism in the consultation process. FC Sommaruga was obliged to reconvene the AGUR in autumn 2016. AGUR12 II concluded its work in March 2017 with a compromise. At the end of 2017, relying largely upon this compromise, the Federal Council submitted a revised bill to Parliament.

Main points of the revised bill

The relevant key elements of the compromise for musical authors are:

  • Obligation for the hosting provider to remove illegal content and to prevent further uploading of such content (Article 39d); provision for processing personal data to facilitate prosecution of illegal uploading of protected music (Article 77i). Additional demands by authors and producers, e.g. to block access to illegal offers on the Internet, met with strong resistance from consumers and network operators, and were disregarded in the compromise. In this context, one should also consider that such blocking in the musical field would in any event have come ten years too late. Thanks to a wide range of affordable, legal and easy-to-use music streaming services, file-sharing networks and illegal services in the musical field have been greatly reduced.
  • SUISA’s right to information from users in tariff negotiations and accelerated procedure for the approval of copyright tariffs (Articles 51 and 74(2))
  • Extended collective licence (Article 43a): this provision, for instance, enables users to obtain a licence from the collecting societies for publications from archives.

Remuneration for video on demand – unnecessary for composers

The Federal Council also proposed to introduce a remuneration claim for music with regard to video on demand (Articles 13a and 35a). Music creators do not, however, need this: Article 10(2) already entitles them to authorise or refuse the use of their works (in this case, film music). SUISA has already concluded licence agreements for VoD services with all main providers. No new remuneration claims are needed. The existing legislation is adequate.

The VoD remuneration claim was primarily designed to enable Swiss filmmakers to receive fair compensation when their films are viewed on new platforms like Netflix. This would reduce the “value gap” that filmmakers suffer because they participate neither in the direct “pay per view” revenue nor in the platforms’ indirect revenues from advertising and the sale of usage data. Conversely to film music composers who are well organised in rights’ management organisations worldwide, Swiss filmmakers have very limited bargaining power and are therefore dependent on this new remuneration claim.

Against the recommendations of AGUR12 II, the Federal Council extended this claim to music authors who, as mentioned above, do not need this special entitlement. Regrettably, the National Council did not follow our reasoning in the detailed discussion of the law in December 2018 and failed to provide for an exception for music authors. The last hope now lies with the Council of States, which will probably deal with the subject in its March session.

New exemption from the obligation to pay remuneration for radio and TV reception in hotel rooms?

In December 2018, the National Council decided, via the back door so to speak, to follow the parliamentary initiative of Valais FDP MP Nantermod and add a new clause in Article 19(1)(d) FCA providing that the retransmission of radio and TV broadcasts, but also of music or video channels, on demand in hotel rooms, rented holiday apartments, hospital rooms and prison cells, are exempted from copyright fees. As a result, authors would be in a worse position than under the existing legislation, and the revision of the law would work largely to their disadvantage.

What is at stake? If a hotel retransmits radio or TV broadcasts to its guest rooms, the retransmission qualifies as a “rebroadcast” within the meaning of Article 10(2)(e) FCA. This was decided by the Federal Supreme Court in 2017. The providers of TV sets and audio players in guest rooms are hoteliers, landlords of holiday apartments, or hospital operators. All of them operate for profit. Such usage does not, therefore, qualify as private use. The jurisprudence in Switzerland and Europe is clear: this is a relevant usage under copyright law.

The decisions are based on the Bern Convention, the most important international treaty in copyright law, and on other international treaties such as the WCT and the WPPT. Switzerland cannot disregard these treaties. If it did, it would expose itself to sanctions because the obligations under the Bern Convention are also enshrined in the WTO Agreement on the Protection of Intellectual Property (TRIPS). To avoid sanctions if Switzerland were to incorporate this new exception into its law, the exception could only apply to the works of Swiss authors – a totally unacceptable discrimination.

“Hotel rooms would hardly be cheaper if the small copyright fee was eliminated.”

What does it cost hoteliers today? Fees are calculated based on the surface area covered by the TV/audio usage. Up to 1000 m2, the monthly licence fee is CHF 38. Hotels with up to 50 rooms of 20m2 each pay less than CHF 1 per room per month. The rate is slightly higher for larger areas. Hotels with 100 rooms pay CHF 91.80, which is still less than CHF 1 per room per month. The cost for hotels is therefore modest. However, all things being equal, the shortfall for authors and other rightholders would add up to some CHF 1 million per year.

Hoteliers pay their other suppliers for all other services delivered to their hotels. These range from electricity and cleaning to soap in the bathrooms. These goods and services are not provided free of charge – they are part of the hotel supply chain. Hoteliers run their hotels for profit, and in-room entertainment contributes to the price of a room and, therefore, to the added value of the hotel. Why should hoteliers who offer this service to their guests not have to pay the music and film rightholders? Exempting hotel rooms from the copyright remuneration obligation would discriminate against authors and other rightholders compared with other suppliers. And consumers would not even benefit from the exemption because hotel rooms would hardly be cheaper if the small copyright fee was eliminated.

The compromise and the FCA revision both at jeopardy

As mentioned above, the compromise bill for the revision of copyright law put together by AGUR12 II and the Federal Council is now on the finishing straight. If Parliament were to significantly worsen authors’ situation by introducing the hotel room exception, authors would feel slighted and might present further demands for revision. With the risk that no new law is adopted and nearly nine years’ revision efforts will all have been for nothing in the end.

If the revision were to deprive them of the right to allow their works to be rebroadcast in hotel rooms against remuneration, music authors would probably be better off under the existing law.

It is essential that we defend the delicate compromise in the coming months and impress on the Councils that no further changes to the detriment of authors are admissible.

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The revision of the existing Copyright Act is entering the decisive phase this year. After seven years’ preparatory work, parliamentary debates have now started. The revised act could come into force on 1.1.2020 if both federal houses respect the delicate compromise. Text by Andreas Wegelin

Copyright law revision: compromise is the key to success – no exceptions for hotel rooms

The jurisprudence in Switzerland and Europe is clear: when a hotel receives radio or television broadcasts and retransmits them into its guest rooms, it is a use which is relevant for copyright purposes. (Photo: Piovesempre / iStock)

The long road to a minor partial revision started nine years’ ago: in 2010, State Councillor Géraldine Savary asked the Federal Council to propose solutions to prevent the use of illegal online offers. The Federal Council rejected the request arguing that authors could simply give more concerts to make up for...read more

Arranging works protected by copyright

Musical works in the public domain can be arranged at will. But works which are still protected by copyright, i.e. whose author has been dead for less than 70 years, cannot be arranged without permission from the rightholders. How does one go about obtaining such permission, and what points must be regulated in the permission in order to be able to register an arrangement with SUISA? Text by Claudia Kempf and Michael Wohlgemuth

Arranging works protected by copyright

To arrange a work protected by copyright whose author has been dead for less than 70 years, permission must be obtained from the rightholders. (Photo: Tabea Hüberli)

The author has the right to decide whether his work can be arranged; in other words, whether a “derived work” or an “arrangement” can be created from his or her original work. This right remains with the author and is not transferred to SUISA under the rights’ administration agreement. A person wishing to arrange a work must contact the author and obtain his or her permission to do so.

Authors generally transfer the arrangement rights to their publishers in the framework of a publishing agreement. On that basis, publishers may authorise third parties to arrange a work, or commission third parties to create a new version of the work. Publishing contracts should regulate whether the publisher may, under certain circumstances, authorise or commission an arrangement directly or whether the publisher must refer back to the author in each case. In the case of published works, therefore, the person to contact for permission is the publisher.

When dealing with successful international repertoires, obtaining permission may be a tiresome procedure, and may not always be crowned with success. Certain rightholders are happy to have their works arranged and more widely disseminated. Other rightholders attach great value to the “integrity” of their works and refuse virtually all arrangements. Either way, before an arrangement can be undertaken, sufficient time should be reserved for ascertaining the legal rights.

NB. If a number of requests have been submitted to the author or the publisher and no response has been received, it is wrong to presume that “silence means consent” and that the work can be arranged simply because “efforts were made” to obtain permission. As a rule, arranging a work without the rightholder’s consent constitutes a copyright infringement and may result in civil and criminal prosecution.

Even once the necessary permission has been obtained, the arranger is not always free to arrange the work at will. The permission may be restricted to a certain type of arrangement (e.g. translation of the lyrics into another language, shortening the work, remis, new instrumentalisation, etc.) Moreover, by law, even if they have permitted an arrangement, authors are entitled to defend their works against “distortion”. In such cases (often difficult to judge), it is the “moral rights” of the author which are at stake.

Key points of an authorisation to arrange

If an author or a publisher grants permission to arrange a work, this permission, consent, or authorisation should be recorded in a short written agreement. The agreement should cover the following points:

a) Name and address of the contractual parties (pseudonyms, if any)

b) Scope of permission: the work to be arranged must be clearly designated, as well as the extent to which the work may be musically or textually arranged. Moreover, the agreement should indicate whether and how the new work can be registered as an arrangement with SUISA.

Good to know: Registering a work as an arrangement only makes sense if the original is already registered with SUISA, and both works (original and arrangement) are to be used side by side (and independently). In the framework of the songwriting process, it is not unusual for “arranged parts” to be attributed to co-musicians although there is no original work which can be used separately. To avoid misunderstandings, it is advisable in such cases to let the co-musicians participate as co-authors rather than as arrangers.

c) Shares: Under SUISA’s Distribution Rules, for unpublished works without lyrics, the arranger is entitled to a 20% share; for published works without lyrics, the arranger’s share is 16.67%. For works with lyrics, the arranger’s share is 15% (unpublished) and 11.67% (published) respectively. In principle, the arranger’s share can be set freely. In practice, the arranger’s share lies between 0% and 25%. SUISA’s Distribution Rules provide for an exception in the case of arrangement permissions granted by publishers: here, the arranger’s share may not exceed the share in the regulatory distribution key. This is designed to avoid the share of the original author from being reduced too far. A rightholder may also permit an arrangement without granting any share of the distribution to the arranger.

d) Publishing an arrangement: In the case of arrangements of published works, it is advisable to specify in the authorisation whether the arrangement must also be published by the publisher of the original work (so that the publisher can retain control over the publishing rights). As a rule, the original publisher will insist on this. In that case, an additional publishing agreement should be signed between the original publisher and the arranger.

e) Rights warranties: Rightholders must warrant that they dispose of the necessary rights to grant the arrangement permission.

f) Place, date, rightholder’s signature

g) Governing law, jurisdiction

Special case: “sub-arrangements”

Sub-publishing agreements generally provide for the transfer of the arrangement rights from the original publisher to the sub-publisher. The sub-publisher is thus entitled to authorise or commission arrangements. In these cases, the arranger is registered as a “sub-arranger” or, with regard to new lyrics, e.g. in another language, as a “sub-lyricist”. Here too, SUISA’s Distribution Rules provide that the sub-arranger’s share may not exceed the share set in the regulatory distribution key.

How to register an arrangement with SUISA

For an arrangement of a protected work, the permission to make the arrangement must be filed – or uploaded in the case of an online registration – together with the registration form. The arranger will only receive a share of the royalties from a work if the permission to arrange explicitly states that the arranger is entitled to a share. If no percentage share is indicated, the arranger will be allocated the regulatory share. If there is no mention of the arranger’s participation, SUISA will record the arranger’s name under the original version, with a note indicating that an authorised arrangement exists but the arranger is not entitled to a participation. Accordingly, the arranger will not receive a share.

When publishers register new versions of works which they have published in the original, SUISA waives the need for an authorisation since the publisher has to settle the arrangement rights directly with its authors. The same applies for sub-publishing agreements.

Summary

To arrange protected works, therefore, you always need the rightholders’ permision – depending on the circumstances, such permission should be obtained from the author, the author’s heirs or from the publisher. Permission is the prerequisite for registering an arrangement of a protected work with SUISA.

SUISA offers its support in tracing the responsible rightholders. In the case of published works, SUISA will give you the publisher’s name and address so that you may contact the latter directly. In the case of unpubished works, SUISA forwards arrangement requests directly to the author or his/her heirs. Inquiries should be addressed to: publisher (at) suisa (dot) ch
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Musical works in the public domain can be arranged at will. But works which are still protected by copyright, i.e. whose author has been dead for less than 70 years, cannot be arranged without permission from the rightholders. How does one go about obtaining such permission, and what points must be regulated in the permission in order to be able to register an arrangement with SUISA? Text by Claudia Kempf and Michael Wohlgemuth

Arranging works protected by copyright

To arrange a work protected by copyright whose author has been dead for less than 70 years, permission must be obtained from the rightholders. (Photo: Tabea Hüberli)

The author has the right to decide whether his work can be arranged; in other words, whether a “derived work” or an “arrangement” can be created from his or her original work. This...read more

Festival Archip-elles – Women Power

The Geneva Festival for contemporary music creation has dedicated itself to music originating from the pen of women for its 2019 event. Archip-elles presents works by female composers of various generations, origin and aesthetics. On Friday, 05 April 2019, SUISA members are invited to a visit at the Festival. Text by Erika Weibel

Festival Archip-elles – Women Power

At the Festival Archip-elles 2019, the focus is on music by female contemporary composers. (Photo: Festival Archipel)

“In an article by the ‘Guardian’, ‘Female composers largely ignored by concert line-ups”, published on 13 June 2018, 1,445 classical concerts were examined which were planned around the world for the 2018-19 season, and the conclusion was drawn that only 76 events featured a work by a woman”, writes Festival director Marc Texier in the Editorial of this year’s festival guide. The Geneva Festival for Contemporary Music Creation creates a counterweight against this gender-based imbalance in the concert world and ensures that the music by female composers is heard at the 2019 event.

The concert programme of this year’s Festival Archip-elles is complemented by installations, round tables and workshops. On Friday morning, 05 April 2019, the Festival organises a workshop, in collaboration with SUISA, on the topic of copyright for students of the “Haute école de musique Genève”, the “Conservatoire populaire de musique” and the participants of the two academies “Académie Archipel” and Composer’s Next Generation (Ensemble Vortex).

Invitation for SUISA members

The Festival Archipel and SUISA cordially invite SUISA members to spend the evening of 05 April 2019 at the Festival. SUISA members who register their participation can attend free of charge. We are looking forward to your registrations until 31 March 2019 at the latest. Please send an e-mail to: kommunikation (at) suisa (dot) ch

A detailed evening programme, to which SUISA members are invited, is listed below. One programme item of particular interest on said evening is the round table discussion on the topic “to be a female composer in Switzerland”.

Round Table Discussion: To be a female composer in Switzerland

What’s it like for female composers to hold their ground in a world dominated by men? Why is it harder for a female composer to get her works to be performed? Why don’t more women choose a career as a composer?

Marc Texier, Festival director, follows up on these questions in a conversation with the two Swiss female composers Katharina Rosenberger and Annette Schmucki as well as with Dr. Irene Minder-Jeanneret, musicologist with a research focus on gender and music.

Once the discussion is over, the stage is open for the musical part of the evening: In a concert with the ensemble Vortex, the work by Swiss composer Barblina Meierhans will have its premiere, among others. Afterwards, Ella Soto will perform on a DJ set.

Detailed programme, where members are invited on Friday, 05 April 2019, at the Festival Archip-elles in Geneva:

5.00pm, Maison communale de Plainpalais
Visit to the installations of Marianthi Papalexandri and Pe Lang

6.00pm, Maison communale de Plainpalais
Drinks and discussion panel: To be a female composer in Switzerland
Dr. Irène Minder-Jeanneret, musicologist
Katharina Rosenberger, composer
Annette Schmucki, composer
Presentation: Marc Texier

8.00pm, Théâtre Pitoëff
Concert
The ensemble Vortex is going to play works by Barblina Meierhans, Olga Kokcharova, Eva Reiter, Ann Cleare, Clara Iannotta and Jessie Marino.

10.00pm – 1.00 am, Maison communale de Plainpalais
Ella Soto – DJ Set, Carte blanche à La VostokE
La Vostoke is the first radio sender in Switzerland which is a 100% female.

www.archipel.org, festival website

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The Geneva Festival for contemporary music creation has dedicated itself to music originating from the pen of women for its 2019 event. Archip-elles presents works by female composers of various generations, origin and aesthetics. On Friday, 05 April 2019, SUISA members are invited to a visit at the Festival. Text by Erika Weibel

Festival Archip-elles – Women Power

At the Festival Archip-elles 2019, the focus is on music by female contemporary composers. (Photo: Festival Archipel)

“In an article by the ‘Guardian’, ‘Female composers largely ignored by concert line-ups”, published on 13 June 2018, 1,445 classical concerts were examined which were planned around the world for the 2018-19 season, and the conclusion was drawn that only 76 events featured a work by a woman”, writes Festival director Marc Texier in the Editorial of this year’s festival guide. The Geneva...read more

SUISA’s IT under new management

IT is the technological backbone of every service provider. SUISA’s IT is now managed by a new team. Text by Andreas Wegelin

SUISA’s IT under new management

The management team of SUISA’s IT from April 2019 onwards (from left to right): Dieter Wijngaards, Jürg Ziebold and Hansruedi Jung. (Photo: Sibylle Roth)

About seven years ago, in December 2011, the SUISA Board approved a new IT strategy in the course of the 2012 budget ratification. The effects of what was summarised in the article “Budget 2012 wrapped up” in SUISAinfo, edition 1.12, had a few consequences in the following years.

The main goal had been to replace SUISA’s IT with the IBM large-scale system and the reorganisation of the IT landscape into a modern architecture. Thanks to the new architecture, IT-based services have been significantly expanded since then. Needs and requirements of members, staff and SUISA customers could be satisfied more quickly and more flexibly with the new developments.

Expansion of online services for members and customers

Members have the option today to process daily SUISA matters via the online app “my account”. In the password-protected member area, settlements are made available electronically every quarter, works registrations can also be carried out. SUISA customers also benefit from the expansion of the online services; most recently due to the online notification of usages for background music or public viewing (CT 3a).

Numerous additional technical developments make our staff members’ work easier and help us save personnel costs. Among such developments are, for example, a digital document management system (DMS) for all member files or the fundamental technical renovation of our works documentation which also enables us to globally carry out online licensing of the works in cooperation with our joint venture partner SESAC in Mint Digital Services.

New management team appointed

The number of staff in the IT sector has increased during that time from 23 to 30. In order to safeguard a circumspect and competent management, the Board has appointed the previous manager of the Applications Technology department, Jürg Ziebold, as overall Manager of SUISA’s IT, and Dieter Wijngaards as new Manager of Applications Technology as of 1 January.

SUISA’s IT setup of two departments continues and comprises, Applications Technology and Systems Technology. Jürg Ziebold directly manages the two heads of department, Dieter Wijngaards (Applications Technology) and Hansruedi Jung (Systems Technology) and a team of business analysts. Whereas Hansruedi Jung has been in charge of the Systems Technology department since 2006, Dieter Wijngaards joins the SUISA IT team on 1 April 2019. Dieter Wijngaards used to be CTO (Chief Technology Officer) at Adesso Schweiz AG and had already been consulting SUISA’s IT since 2012 during the development of the new IT architecture.

SUISA’s Executive Committee is pleased with the appointment of the new IT management team and is convinced that it thus continues to safeguard the central role of IT in terms of executing business processes. It wishes the new IT management good luck.

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IT is the technological backbone of every service provider. SUISA’s IT is now managed by a new team. Text by Andreas Wegelin

SUISA’s IT under new management

The management team of SUISA’s IT from April 2019 onwards (from left to right): Dieter Wijngaards, Jürg Ziebold and Hansruedi Jung. (Photo: Sibylle Roth)

About seven years ago, in December 2011, the SUISA Board approved a new IT strategy in the course of the 2012 budget ratification. The effects of what was summarised in the article “Budget 2012 wrapped up” in SUISAinfo, edition 1.12, had a few consequences in the following years.

The main goal had been to replace SUISA’s IT with the IBM large-scale system and the reorganisation of the IT landscape into a modern architecture. Thanks to the new architecture, IT-based services have been significantly expanded since then. Needs and...read more

Changes in the distribution of revenues from radio uses

The classifications for radio broadcasting stations have been changed. Starting with the 2019 settlements, a uniform factor of 0.25 will be applied for level D uses (sound logos, jingles, background music, etc.), and a factor of 1.5 for level E (other music). In addition, calculations will be made on a per-second instead of a per-minute basis. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold

Changes in the distribution of revenues from radio uses

The rules for the distribution of revenues from radio uses have been changed. (Photo: T.Dallas / Shutterstock.com)

In 2015, the factors for the distribution of revenues from television broadcasts were changed. The classifications for radio broadcasts have now been changed as well. The rules are set out in points 3.2 and 3.3 of SUISA’s Distribution Rules.

The new rules are based on an essential principle: radio classifications must be appropriate, and at the same time they must be proportionate with existing rules for TV broadcasts.

In practice, this has been achieved as follows: firstly, billing is now on a per-second basis for radio as well; secondly, in level D, degressive rates have also been abolished for radio and replaced by a uniform factor of 0.25; finally, a factor of 1.5 has been introduced for level E (other music) to bring it into a more appropriate relationship with level D.

The reasoning and main arguments for each point are outlined below:

Billing per second

Billing per second ensures more accurate distribution, and better reflects actual usage. Thanks to the Echolon monitoring system, this is now possible at no additional cost. The playing duration of works can now be determined in a uniform manner for radio and television.

Level D (sound logos, jingles, background music, etc.)

Hitherto, degressive rates were still applicable in level D for radio broadcasters although they had been abolished for television broadcasters. The three existing factors (1, 0.5 and 0.05) are relatively arbitrary and are likely to produce inappropriate results. This is more particularly true for the factor of 0.05 in the case of successful productions with over 52 broadcasts in a single distribution period. In other words: the beneficiaries concerned receive too little compared with the other degressive rates. By introducing a uniform rate of 0.25, an appropriate factor – one that is proportionate with the other levels – has been chosen for the music uses in level D. It is also the same factor as for television.

Level E (other music)

Once a uniform factor of 0.25 is introduced in level D, the existing factor of 1 for other music is no longer proportionate to the other factors, taking into account the television classifications. This was remedied by applying a new factor of 1.5. This factor is appropriate both with regard to TV broadcast classifications (“Concerts”: factor 2, “Music in films”: factor 1 and “Sound logos, jingles, background music, etc.”: factor 0.25) and with regard to the radio broadcast classifications (level D: now 0.25)

For further information:
www.suisa.ch/verteilungsreglement (in German)

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All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

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The classifications for radio broadcasting stations have been changed. Starting with the 2019 settlements, a uniform factor of 0.25 will be applied for level D uses (sound logos, jingles, background music, etc.), and a factor of 1.5 for level E (other music). In addition, calculations will be made on a per-second instead of a per-minute basis. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold

Changes in the distribution of revenues from radio uses

The rules for the distribution of revenues from radio uses have been changed. (Photo: T.Dallas / Shutterstock.com)

In 2015, the factors for the distribution of revenues from television broadcasts were changed. The classifications for radio broadcasts have now been changed as well. The rules are set out in points 3.2 and 3.3 of SUISA’s Distribution Rules.

The new rules are based on an essential principle: radio classifications must be appropriate, and at the...read more

Attendance at IKF opens up new prospects for Swiss musicians

The FONDATION SUISA and Pro Helvetia presented their joint stand under the banner “Swiss Music” for the first time at the 31st Internationale Kulturbörse in Freiburg, Germany. The results have been positive. Text by Urs Schnell, FONDATION SUISA

FONDATION SUISA: Attendance at IKF opens up new prospects for Swiss musicians

Mich Gerber appears at the 2019 Internationale Kulturbörse Freiburg. (Photo: Marcel Kaufmann)

Last year, the Internationale Kulturbörse Freiburg (IKF) celebrated its 30th anniversary with a Swiss focus. The FONDATION SUISA went along to see whether the most important trade fair in the German-speaking region for stage production, music and events would be the right place for Swiss musicians to be represented. There were repeated suggestions from the music scene that this could give rise to new performance opportunities on German stages and in small venues.

For years, the FONDATION SUISA has been involved in foreign music showcase festivals and music trade fairs, with the aim of promoting networking between the domestic music scene and international promoters and agencies. Following an in-depth assessment of the IKF’s potential, it thus seemed an obvious choice to implement the successful concept of a joint Swiss stand from 20 to 23 January this year in Freiburg for the first time.

Over the three days, the “Swiss Music” stand – in collaboration with Pro Helvetia – allowed artists and their agencies to connect with the vibrant promoter scene and, in particular, to meet promoters who operate outside the usual music network. Exchange with the Swiss music scene could especially open up new prospects for small theatres relying on a varied programme of fringe events.

Our joint stand allowed musicians and agencies to present themselves to a wide audience without having to hire their own expensive stand, allowing them to take maximum advantage of the IKF as a communication platform, marketplace and a place for development. Many saw the fact that IKF is not merely a music trade fair as a positive, offering potential new ground. Having the ‘Swiss Music’ stand right next to the entrance to the adjoining performing arts and street theatre hall was a major boost to visibility.

A wide array of extraordinary figures also appeared live on stage, with performances from Mich Gerber, Gina Été, the Postharmonic Orchestra, Moes Anthill, Bruno Bieri and Park Stickney.

Initial feedback on the first Swiss presence in Freiburg has been extremely positive. As a key meeting point for small and mid-sized stage productions in the German-speaking region, the IKF will also open up new opportunities for Swiss musicians in future.

For more information, please visit:
ikf.swissmusic.ch and www.fondation-suisa.ch/ikf

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All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

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The FONDATION SUISA and Pro Helvetia presented their joint stand under the banner “Swiss Music” for the first time at the 31st Internationale Kulturbörse in Freiburg, Germany. The results have been positive. Text by Urs Schnell, FONDATION SUISA

FONDATION SUISA: Attendance at IKF opens up new prospects for Swiss musicians

Mich Gerber appears at the 2019 Internationale Kulturbörse Freiburg. (Photo: Marcel Kaufmann)

Last year, the Internationale Kulturbörse Freiburg (IKF) celebrated its 30th anniversary with a Swiss focus. The FONDATION SUISA went along to see whether the most important trade fair in the German-speaking region for stage production, music and events would be the right place for Swiss musicians to be represented. There were repeated suggestions from the music scene that this could give rise to new performance opportunities on German stages and in small venues.

For years, the FONDATION SUISA has been involved in foreign music...read more