“I composed all of my pieces based on gut instinct”

Martin Nauer is one of the three nominees for the Prix Walo 2018 in the category folk music. The accordion player has been performing for more than four decades with the Ländler ensemble Carlo Brunner. At the 44th Prix Walo, SUISA presents the award in the category folk music and has asked Martin Nauer some questions in writing in the context of his nomination. Text/Interview by Sibylle Roth

Martin Nauer: “I composed all of my pieces based on gut instinct”

Martin Nauer has already learned how to play the accordion at the age of five. (Photo: Monika Nussbaumer)

A young Martin Nauer often rode his small ‘hog’ (motorbike) to Meierskappel in order to learn new fingering for the accordion from Walter Grob. He listened to his role models as often as possible since he learned all fingering and chords by ear. Together with Carlo Brunner, he founded the Carlo Brunner ensemble and thus created the foundation for his career in 1975. Nauer had a myriad of performances in Switzerland and abroad and contributed to several vinyl and CD recordings.

Martin Nauer, you have written several pieces for the Carlo Brunner ensemble. How exactly did these pieces come about? Were you given any specifications or were you given a free hand for your compositions?
Martin Nauer: In total, I have composed about 50 melodies. They are all registered on one of the many CDs which we produced with the Carlo Brunner ensemble. When it comes to my compositions, I have never received any specifications or tips nor did I have to adhere to any recommendations. I composed all of my pieces based on gut instinct.

You have been a SUISA member since 1976 and many of your compositions have been edited by various publishers. Could you enjoy a financially carefree life based on the royalties that you receive based on your SUISA membership?
SUISA member since 1976? How time flies! No, the royalties that I am due as a composer and that are paid out to me via SUISA do obviously not allow me to live a carefree life. After all, there aren’t quite that many compositions of mine and they are not played often enough to provide a lot of money based on the remuneration. The royalties are, however, still a welcome ‘top up’ with which I can enjoy the odd thing.

You took a step back from the Carlo Brunner ensemble at the end of 2017. Do you have more time now to compose your own pieces?
I do not exclusively use the time I have gained via my withdrawal from the Carlo Brunner ensemble for composing music. Yet, I still have strong ties with folk music and if I come up with a new melody or at least a sequence for a new dance, I’ll record the sounds onto a tape recorder with the open expectation that one day something might come of it. Since I cannot write or read music, I need help so that the new melody is then put down on paper.

What does the Prix Walo nomination mean to you?
The Prix Walo nomination is a huge joy for me and, at the same time, a great surprise. As a member in the formation and as partner of Carlo Brunner – for more than 43 years – I had the privilege to participate in Carlo’s success whenever he won a Prix Walo. And to this date, that has been the case four times. These awards have always meant a lot in terms of recognition for us ensemble members. The fact that I am personally nominated for the award this time, is really something I didn’t expect. As I said, I am very happy and I am proud that I was bestowed with this great honour by the mere nomination.

www.prixwalo.ch, Prix Walo website

The award ceremony of the 44th Prix Walo takes place on 13 May 2018 in the TPC studios in Zurich and will be broadcast live on Star TV from 08.00pm onwards. At the Prix Walo event, Swiss artists from various genres are honoured. It is the aim of the Prix Walo to promote the Swiss show business in general and young talent in the entertainment sector. SUISA sponsors the Prix Walo and awards the prize in the folk music category this year.
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Martin Nauer is one of the three nominees for the Prix Walo 2018 in the category folk music. The accordion player has been performing for more than four decades with the Ländler ensemble Carlo Brunner. At the 44th Prix Walo, SUISA presents the award in the category folk music and has asked Martin Nauer some questions in writing in the context of his nomination. Text/Interview by Sibylle Roth

Martin Nauer: “I composed all of my pieces based on gut instinct”

Martin Nauer has already learned how to play the accordion at the age of five. (Photo: Monika Nussbaumer)

A young Martin Nauer often rode his small ‘hog’ (motorbike) to Meierskappel in order to learn new fingering for the accordion from Walter Grob. He listened to his role models as often as possible since he learned all fingering and chords by ear. Together with Carlo Brunner,...read more

“Each of us comes up with a piece of music or a melody once in a while”

One of the three nominees for the Prix Walo 2018 in the folk music category is the formation Ils Fränzlis da Tschlin. With their line-up consisting of Domenic and Curdin Janett and their daughters Anna Staschia, Cristina and Madlaina, they have been making music since 2014, loosely based on the “original Fränzlismusig” of the 19th century. At the 44th Prix Walo, SUISA awards the prize for the folk music genre, and has sent some questions on their music, creating compositions and their nomination in writing to Madlaina Janett, the viola player of the formation. Text/Interview by Sibylle Roth

“Each of us comes up with a piece of music or a melody once in a while”

Ils Fränzlis da Tschlin: “We are ambassadors of such pieces which got stuck during their journey through the ballrooms of Europe in the Engadine”. (Photo: Flurin Bertschinger)

The original Fränzlis from the 19th century were brought to life by Franz-Josef Waser who – due to his short stature – was called “Fränzli”. They played dance music and people were talking about the legendary Fränzlis all the way into the 20th century. The new Fränzlis were founded in 1982 by Men Steiner and Domenic Janett. Since 2012, their line-up consisted of clarinet, violin, cello, viola and double base. After the latest changes in their line-up – Cristina joined for the cello and Anna Staschia for the violin – the women are now outnumbering the men in the formation.

Madlaina Janett, Ils Fränzlis da Tschlin have been ambassadors for Engadine dance music. What is the ratio between traditional works and own compositions in your ensemble?
Madlaina Janett, Ils Fränzlis da Tschlin: If we put together a programme for a concert, we attempt to fill it about fifty:fifty with new compositions – by ourselves and other composers –and traditional dances. When we do this, we don’t pursue the objective to renovate or modernise tradition. We just want to have a nice dramaturgy in the concert which offers a lot of diversity and where we are able to surprise the audience every now and then with some unfamiliar tunes. When we play our music on dance occasions – something that’s unfortunately rather rare these days – traditional pieces prevail, since they are better to dance to than new compositions which have often been and are being composed for concert situations.
At this point, we would also like to comment on the key word “ambassadors of Engadine dance music”: We would not describe ourselves as such. On the one hand because we play – as mentioned above – only rarely at dance occasions, and on the other hand, because it’s hardly possible to say what exactly “Engadine music” is supposed to be. Our role models, the original Fränzlis of the 19th century, weren’t even from the Engadine – they were from central Switzerland – and played all sorts of music: from absolutely popular hits via operetta melodies to traditional waltzes. And if you investigate into the so-called ‘traditional’ songs a little more, you often realise that they have had a long odyssey through the dance halls of the entire Alpine region and that it’s absolutely impossible to say whether a piece had been created in the Engadine or rather in the Burgenland, or in Italy. So maybe we are ambassadors of pieces which have stayed behind after their journey through the dance halls in Europe and have been refined in the style of the local musicians.

How do you proceed when you composer new pieces? Your works have often been composed by somebody alone; do you have different approaches?
The approach of each individual Fränzli members are rather different: Curdin and Domenic compose and arrange much on behalf of the widest variety of instrumentation. The younger generation composes in a more spontaneous fashion: If you think of something, you write it down. For the Fränzli programmes, we usually do not have any specific pressure to compose anything. Each of us comes up with a piece of music or a melody once in a while. You bring the finished piece along or the fragment into the rehearsal and then we try out together whether it fits in with our formation or not. This is, by the way, the same approach we take whenever we incorporate works by composers into our programme who do not play with us.

The two oldest and the youngest member of the current formation are SUISA members, whereas you and Cristina aren’t. How so? Are you not involved in the compositions?
Actually, that’s merely a sign that Cristina and I were simply too lazy to look after SUISA matters.
The two compositions we’d each have to register would not really create such an immediate call for action. But that may yet happen …

What does the Prix Walo nomination mean to you?
To be honest: We’re still unsure how someone picked us.
We have – so far – associated the Prix Walo with the big show and TV world, with glitzy dresses and dirndl and not with a formation like ours which nearly always appears in small places, without amplifier and dressed in black.
But of course we are really happy that someone thought of us and and that there is a perception for us even though we do not conform to many of the requirements of the show and entertainment scene.

www.fraenzlis.ch, Ils Fränzlis da Tschlin website
www.prixwalo.ch, Prix Walo website

The award ceremony of the 44th Prix Walo takes place on 13 May 2018 in the TPC studios in Zurich and will be broadcast live on Star TV from 08.00pm onwards. At the Prix Walo event, Swiss artists from various genres are honoured. It is the aim of the Prix Walo to promote the Swiss show business in general and young talent in the entertainment sector. SUISA sponsors the Prix Walo and awards the prize in the folk music category this year.
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One of the three nominees for the Prix Walo 2018 in the folk music category is the formation Ils Fränzlis da Tschlin. With their line-up consisting of Domenic and Curdin Janett and their daughters Anna Staschia, Cristina and Madlaina, they have been making music since 2014, loosely based on the “original Fränzlismusig” of the 19th century. At the 44th Prix Walo, SUISA awards the prize for the folk music genre, and has sent some questions on their music, creating compositions and their nomination in writing to Madlaina Janett, the viola player of the formation. Text/Interview by Sibylle Roth

“Each of us comes up with a piece of music or a melody once in a while”

Ils Fränzlis da Tschlin: “We are ambassadors of such pieces which got stuck during their journey through the ballrooms of Europe in the Engadine”. (Photo: Flurin Bertschinger)

The original Fränzlis from the 19th century were...read more

“A lot of what we have in our folk music comes from classical music”

Dani Häusler is one of three nominees for the Prix Walo 2018 in the category folk music. Häusler started playing the clarinet already at an early age and is nowadays active in several formations. At the 44th Prix Walo event, SUISA presents the award in the category folk music and has asked the nominee some questions in writing. Text/Interview by Sibylle Roth

Dani Häusler: “A lot of what we have in our folk music comes from classical music”

Clarinettist Dani Häusler is one of the youngest recipients of the “Goldener Violinschlüssel“ (Golden Violin Clef). (Photo: Pit Bühler)

At the age of 11, Dani Häusler began playing the clarinet and the saxophone, and, shortly after, performed with his first band, the Gupfbuebä. He studied classical music and influenced modern folk music as part of the formations Pareglish and Hujässler. In 1987, Dani Häusler joined SUISA. He teaches the clarinet, is Director of folk music at the SRF (Swiss national broadcaster), lecturer at the University of Lucerne and he is a recipient of the Golden Violin Clef which he was awarded last year.

Dani Häusler, you have studied classical music and also arranged some classical pieces for folk music such as “Ländlerische Tänze” (“Country Dances”) by Mozart. How do the two music genres mix?
Dani Häusler: A lot of what we have in our folk music comes from classical music. Mozart dances can be taken over pretty much on a one-to-one basis. The difference does, however, become apparent during the interpretation – classical musicians perform in a rather cultivated manner whereas folk musicians do so more crudely. It’s in that difference where I find a great stimulus.

You dedicate yourself to both new and traditional folk music. How do the two styles differ and what do you prefer: To create new compositions or to interpret traditional works?
The “new” folk music is generally more challenging. Much of it is geared towards a concert situation. Traditional folk music rather celebrates cosy gatherings such as going out for dinner, drinks or dancing. You can compose in a traditional or a modern manner – however, the “new stuff” entails a bigger effort. Unfortunately I have not been able to do this due to a lack of time over the last few years.

You are the Director for folk music at the Musikwelle. What is the prognosis for folk music in Switzerland at the moment?
It’s good. But it always depends on where you look. The Schwyzerörgeli (Swiss diatonic button accordion) formations are booming like mad, brass bands have decreased massively. In general, it’s the audience that is mainly missing. Even though major events are on the rise, it gets increasingly harder to organise folk music evenings in restaurants.

What does the Prix Walo nomination mean to you?
I am very happy about it – but it won’t change my life.

www.danihaeusler.ch, Dani Häusler website
www.prixwalo.ch, Prix Walo website

The award ceremony of the 44th Prix Walo takes place on 13 May 2018 in the TPC studios in Zurich and will be broadcast live on Star TV from 08.00pm onwards. At the Prix Walo event, Swiss artists from various genres are honoured. It is the aim of the Prix Walo to promote the Swiss show business in general and young talent in the entertainment sector. SUISA sponsors the Prix Walo and awards the prize in the folk music category this year.
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Dani Häusler is one of three nominees for the Prix Walo 2018 in the category folk music. Häusler started playing the clarinet already at an early age and is nowadays active in several formations. At the 44th Prix Walo event, SUISA presents the award in the category folk music and has asked the nominee some questions in writing. Text/Interview by Sibylle Roth

Dani Häusler: “A lot of what we have in our folk music comes from classical music”

Clarinettist Dani Häusler is one of the youngest recipients of the “Goldener Violinschlüssel“ (Golden Violin Clef). (Photo: Pit Bühler)

At the age of 11, Dani Häusler began playing the clarinet and the saxophone, and, shortly after, performed with his first band, the Gupfbuebä. He studied classical music and influenced modern folk music as part of the formations Pareglish and Hujässler. In 1987, Dani Häusler joined SUISA. He teaches the clarinet, is...read more

20,000 Swiss Francs and an imaginary composition project

To discuss artistic creation is anything but simple. That’s why Swiss association Jazzy Jams and SUISA have come up with something special in the course of the Jazz Festival in Bess (Lugano). Composer Maria Bonzanigo, from Ticino, and composers Pietro Viviani and Damiano Merzari developed an imaginary composition project in front of the audience. The result was rather fascinating and took those present on a journey into the thought-world of authors. Guest contribution by Zeno Gabaglio

Jazz in Bess: 20,000 Swiss Francs and an imaginary composition project

Zeno Gabaglio (Co-moderator), Maria Bonzanigo, Pietro Viviani, Alessandro Zanoli (Moderator) and Damiano Merzari (in the picture from left to right) have discussed their most private creative processes as composers. (Photo: Erika Weibel

An entire evening focussing on the subject of musical creation can actually be rather boring. Especially because the topic itself creates a conundrum – comparable to the mysteries that surround each history of creation, or genesis. The explanation of musical creation usually leads to two unpleasant results: erring around aimlessly between contradictory philosophical beliefs or completely rejecting something that conflicts by nature with logical thinking and explanations.

Fully aware of this starting position, Swiss association Jazzy Jams and SUISA organised an evening dedicated to musical creation on Thursday, 25 January 2018 in the Swiss National Sound Archives in Lugano. Naturally, the question arose how you might map out such an evening without ‘dead-ending’ in the above mentioned, fateful cul-de-sac.

Spontaneous composing in front of the audience

The idea was to let three invited music authors directly dive into the subject matter; into a situation which is as practice-related as it is specific, so that there is neither room for philosophical palaver nor any moments of awkward silence.

But how? By sending each of them an invite by an imaginary committee. They got summoned to collaborate on a new project. The text that was only revealed at the beginning of the meeting was the following:

“Jazzy Jams wishes to inaugurate its new hall with a number of concerts and invites musicians from the Italian-speaking region of Switzerland to spontaneously conceive an artistic work. The event is about a performance in a modular-built and technically well-equipped room with a capacity of 400 seats. The composition budget amounts to CHF 5,000. For the actual implementation, CHF 15,000 is available. The time span from concept to implementation is nine months. There are no specifications regarding music styles or duration, and the composer shall have the entire evening to him/herself.”

The only condition for each author was to lay bare their very own creative process to the audience – in a kind of inner dialogue, but spoken out loud.

Maria Bonzanigo, Pietro Viviani and Damiano Merzari (members of the band The Pussywarmers) have generously made themselves available for this project by – in a rather unusual open brainstorming – revealed their generally most private creative processes.

Different music styles, different approaches

The result: captivating, electrifying, surprising and sometimes ironic. This was due to the fact that music genres (theatre and concert music in the case of Bonzanigo; jazz, soundtracks and concert music in the case of Viviani; independent rock in the case of Merzari) illustrated rather different ways to access the very same phenomenon which all of us – rather unimaginatively but proudly – refer to under the same term, “music”.

Certain doubts and questions arose in the course of the discussion – apart from solid technical and poetic certainties. And maybe they were the most interesting moments of the event. They revealed the creative process not only as an equation which can be solved with one single result, but also a part of your life map which you need to travel to, even though this entails the usual unavoidable surprises along the journey.

In the second part of the evening, the subject of the creation process moved a little bit into the background; the focus was rather on the question whether artistic creation can be taught. And if so, how?

Tamara Basaric of the Conservatorio della Svizzera Italiana, Giorgio Meuwly and Marco Conti of the Scuola di Musica Moderna as well as Andrés Ortiz of the Scuola di Musica e di Arti Creative were the specialist mentors (as well as authors) and provided answers in both an expert and an exciting manner.

Links
Jazz in Bess
Maria Bonzanigo
Pietro Viviani
The Pussywarmers

Guest contributor Zeno Gabaglio is a SUISA Board member, composer and was the co-moderator of the Jazz in Bess.

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To discuss artistic creation is anything but simple. That’s why Swiss association Jazzy Jams and SUISA have come up with something special in the course of the Jazz Festival in Bess (Lugano). Composer Maria Bonzanigo, from Ticino, and composers Pietro Viviani and Damiano Merzari developed an imaginary composition project in front of the audience. The result was rather fascinating and took those present on a journey into the thought-world of authors. Guest contribution by Zeno Gabaglio

Jazz in Bess: 20,000 Swiss Francs and an imaginary composition project

Zeno Gabaglio (Co-moderator), Maria Bonzanigo, Pietro Viviani, Alessandro Zanoli (Moderator) and Damiano Merzari (in the picture from left to right) have discussed their most private creative processes as composers. (Photo: Erika Weibel

An entire evening focussing on the subject of musical creation can actually be rather boring. Especially because the topic itself creates a conundrum – comparable...read more

M4music copyright debate: Streaming = Goldmine?

At the M4music 2018, SUISA is going to hold a panel discussion on Streaming. Participants discuss, among other subjects, whether artists get their fair shares in a booming streaming market and – if not – what needs to change. Text by Erika Weibel

M4music copyright debate: Streaming = Goldmine?

The 21st M4music takes place between 22 and 24 March 2018. (Photo: M4music)

The turnover of Streaming providers are on the rise: Videos, text and lyrics, images and music files are used via the internet as intensively as never before. It’s not just authors of the works that benefit from this but also big players such as Google, Facebook etc. What does it look like in future if the value creation is mainly happening at the big internet companies while the providers of the contents i.e. the creators and artists remain empty-handed?

What would potential scenarios and paths that could guarantee a fair – or at least fairer – income for creators and artists?

We are looking forward to a large audience which is of course invited to participate in the conversation.

Event details:

Friday, 23 March 2018 at 5.00pm
Matchbox in the Schiffbau, Zurich

The panel will be held in German and translated into French.

The 21st M4music takes place between 22 and 24 March 2018. The pop music festival of the Migros-Kulturprozent in Lausanne and Zurich provides a diverse programme again: Concerts by over 50 national and international acts, panel discussions and workshops on current topics of the music business.

www.m4music.ch/en/conference

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At the M4music 2018, SUISA is going to hold a panel discussion on Streaming. Participants discuss, among other subjects, whether artists get their fair shares in a booming streaming market and – if not – what needs to change. Text by Erika Weibel

M4music copyright debate: Streaming = Goldmine?

The 21st M4music takes place between 22 and 24 March 2018. (Photo: M4music)

The turnover of Streaming providers are on the rise: Videos, text and lyrics, images and music files are used via the internet as intensively as never before. It’s not just authors of the works that benefit from this but also big players such as Google, Facebook etc. What does it look like in future if the value creation is mainly happening at the big internet companies while the providers of the contents i.e. the creators and artists...read more

Applications for the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018

SUISA organises another Songwriting Camp together with Pele Loriano Productions. The second SUISA Songwriting Camp will be held between 18 and 20 June 2018. SUISA members can apply to participate. Text by Manu Leuenberger

Applications for the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018

The SUISA Songwriting Camp is taking place for a second time in June 2018. Above, a group shot of participants is shown, taken at the Powerplay Studios during the successful première of the Songwriting Camp in August 2017. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

The SUISA Songwriting Camp takes place for a second time after its successful première in the summer of 2017 (4 songs from the camp made it to the Swiss ESC final, among them the winning song “Stones”). This year, the Songwriting Camp will be held between Monday 18 and Wednesday 20 June 2018. Planned venue for the event are the Powerplay Studios in Maur near Zurich.

The goal of the Songwriting Camp is to compose pop songs, tailored for radio broadcasts and capable of storming the charts, with the potential to comprise all facets of temporary pop – in the range of “urban” to singer/songwriter. Resulting songs shall have the spectrum to be offered to publishers and artists from the pop scene and to be viable material for the Eurovision Song Contest.

Spaces for SUISA member participation

The exact number of participants’ spaces at the Songwriting Camp will only be made known once the exact set up of the participating songwriters has been completed. At least half of the participants’ spaces are available for SUISA members from all regions of Switzerland. SUISA members will benefit from the opportunity to compose pieces of music together with other professional songwriters from all over the world at the Songwriting Camp.

Participants are expected to exhibit well-versed musical competencies, team spirit, creativity and efficient working styles. Teams of 3-5 people are presented with the task to write a song from scratch within one day during the “songwriting sessions” – the result is a demo version of the completed piece in the evening.

In order to make this cooperation a success, participants must be able to retrieve their creative potential and be open for critique in the exchange with the co-composers. SUISA members Kate Northrop, Lars Christen, Chiara Dubey, Alejandro Reyes and the siblings Co & Stee Gfeller aka Zibbz report of their experience during last year’s SUISA Songwriting Camp in video interviews.

Applications for the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018

SUISA members may apply for participation in the Songwriting Camp. We are looking for producers, lyricists, composers and songwriters who wish to participate for one or several days at the SUISA Songwriting Camp.

Applications should contain:

  • a short biography;
  • meaningful reference songs (mp3 files or internet links);
  • contact infos (including valid e-mail addresses and phone numbers).

The applications with the documentation should be sent via e-mail, including the subject line “Application – SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018” to:
songwritingcamp (at) suisa (dot) ch
The deadline for applications is 8 April 2018.

Selection process and dates

International artists as well as participating SUISA members are selected by the artistic programme director of the Songwriting Camp. A harmonious mix of participants is paramount for the creative success of the “Songwriting Sessions”. Pele Loriano Productions are going to take on the artistic programme directorship on behalf of SUISA.

The artistic programme director will directly communicate any acceptance messages and invitations as well as further details on the participation at the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018 by 31 May 2018.

There will be no mail-out of letters of rejection. If you have not received an acceptance message by 31 May 2018 you were not taken into consideration for the Songwriting Camp 2018. Please note that, at no time whatsoever, any claims arise to a participation in the event by sending in an application. There will also not be any correspondence in relation to the actual allocation of spaces. It is currently unconfirmed whether or not SUISA will continue to co-organise Songwriting Camps after June 2018.

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SUISA organises another Songwriting Camp together with Pele Loriano Productions. The second SUISA Songwriting Camp will be held between 18 and 20 June 2018. SUISA members can apply to participate. Text by Manu Leuenberger

Applications for the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018

The SUISA Songwriting Camp is taking place for a second time in June 2018. Above, a group shot of participants is shown, taken at the Powerplay Studios during the successful première of the Songwriting Camp in August 2017. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

The SUISA Songwriting Camp takes place for a second time after its successful première in the summer of 2017 (4 songs from the camp made it to the Swiss ESC final, among them the winning song “Stones”). This year, the Songwriting Camp will be held between Monday 18 and Wednesday 20 June 2018. Planned venue for the event...read more

Schedler Music Summit 2018 with Romina Kalsi

The sixth recurrence of the Schedler Music Summit, an annual international songwriting camp which is organised by music publishing house Schedler Music, took place between 13 and 18 January 2018 in Lechtal, Austria. For five days, a team of 42 musicians from a variety of musical and geographic contexts with the task to compose a minimum of one song per day. Romina Kalsi, who has been a SUISA member since 2014, was selected by those in charge of the camp and the summit, Fiona Schedler and Alexander Schedler, as one of the nine summit participants from Switzerland. Text by Erika Weibel

Schedler Music Summit 2018 with Romina Kalsi

Romina Kalsi, a young singer and songwriter from Ticino was one of the participants of the Schedler Music Summit 2018. From her first experience in an international songwriting camp, Romina brings along three new songs and numerous new contacts to the international music scene. (Photo: Wolfgang Rudigier)

Romina Kalsi, a young singer and songwriter from Ticino, has become known over the last years due to the success of the band Rocky Wood. The frontwoman, singer and co-composer of the tracks has contributed significantly to the success and the creation of the first album “Shimmer” which was published by the band from Ticino in 2014. After that, Romina has selected a new solo path with her project Animor from which a digital EP named “Chasing Gold” emerged.

Creation of the works by Romina Kalsi

Kalsi explains to us that composing one of her songs can sometimes be a long process which easily keeps her busy for three to four months. This is due to the fact that she does not always has the possibility to dedicate all of their time exclusively to songwriting. It’s also possible that the basic idea for a work simply needs to ripen over a certain period of time. She does not set herself a time limit when it comes to composing for herself.

Source of inspiration and starting point for her works are often life experiences which left a mark on her, or synergies which arise in the cooperation with other musicians who respectively trigger a creative process.

Songwriting camp: Three works in three days

The participation in the Schedler Summit is Romina Kalsi’s first experience in an international songwriting camp. Fiona Schedler explained that it was particularly Romina Kalsi’s particular timbre which stood out among more than fifty SUISA authors who had applied, which was, among others, a reason that she was selected to participate in the camp. The camp gained musical variety due to Kalsi’s participation.

Alexander Schedler, the artistic leader of the camp, asked her to compose a piece for her current solo project Animor as a first assignment. It was composed in collaboration with Finnish creator Tobias Grandbacka, Riccardo Bettiol of Switzerland and Ida Björg Leisin from Denmark in one day; it’s title is “Crumble Plastic”. The piece is a pop song which is characterised by reggae elements and whose lyrics have been inspired by a current topic. It is very important for Kalsi that her music contains a message. She is of the opinion that composer carry a major responsibility since they can reach straight for the hearts of the audience with their music.

Kalsi adds that “Crumble Plastic” is the result of a surprising agreement and incredible feeling which immediately arose among the involved musicians. It was nearly written in an organic process, in a long jam session which left enough space to each composer to be able to integrate their ideas into the song.

The other works that the summit representative from Ticino was involved in are “Big Shot”, a melancholic pop song and “At The End Of The World” whose genre is similar to a soundtrack.

The composition process was rather dissimilar to the one for “Crumble Plastic”. Both are the result of intensive communication between the involved composers. In this case, the starting point were the song lyrics, characterised by metaphoric images which were created via the exchange of feelings and personal experiences of various musicians. The result: two poetic sets of lyrics which served as a basis for a nearly mathematical composition of the melody. Each passage of lyrics and music is thus the result of acrimonious work of communicating and integrating experiences of the participating composers.

In the coming months, we will find out where and when “Big Shot” and “At The End Of The World” will be published.

Challenges and advantages of a songwriting camp

Deep and long lasting friendships can arise among the musicians who collaborate during a songwriting camp and exchange very personal experiences at this occasion in order to compose songs together. Sometimes it also happens that the spark among the participants does not jump immediately or that the topics allocated by the artistic leader do not correspond with the reality or nature of the musician.

The limited deadline prescribing that at least one song has to be written per day, the feeling between the musicians and the stress arising from unavoidable confrontation with other songs which are created in the camp, are some additional aspects which either hinder or kindle the composers’ creativity, and they sometimes spur them on to reach maximum performance. As a consequence, and despite the limited time, capturing songs are created in the camp, with which not only the composers of the works but also a broad audience can identify. Alexander Schedler, creative leader of the camp, confirms that Kalsi met these challenges with great enthusiasm and creativity.

From her first experience in an international songwriting camp, Romina does not only bring along three new songs but also numerous contacts to the international music scene. Thanks to the cooperation with rather different musicians, she can also draw from new composition approaches and styles and emerges from this experience with musical maturity. Romina tells us that she has already four projects in the pipeline where she is going to enter into new cooperations with the composers who she met in the songwriting camp. In the coming months, she is particularly focussing on the implementation of her project Animor.

Tracks composed by Romina Kalsi during the summit camp, with the participation of:

“Big Shot”
Romina Kalsi
Dillon Dixon
Phil Sunday
Ida Björg Leisin

“Crumble Plastic”
Romina Kalsi
Riccardo Bettiol
Ida Björg Leisin
Tobias Grandbacka

“At The End Of The World”
Romina Kalsi
Pele Loriano
Tobias Grandbacka

SUISA Sponsoring at the Schedler Summit:
SUISA was one of the sponsors of the Schedler Music Summit 2018. Schedler Music Publishing has been registered with SUISA since 2005 and is active via various sub-publishing agreements in nearly all Western and English-speaking countries. At the Summit 2018, a total of 61 songs were composed with the participation of 42 musicians from 9 countries.

www.animormusic.com
schedlermusicsummit.com
schedlermusic.com

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All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

The sixth recurrence of the Schedler Music Summit, an annual international songwriting camp which is organised by music publishing house Schedler Music, took place between 13 and 18 January 2018 in Lechtal, Austria. For five days, a team of 42 musicians from a variety of musical and geographic contexts with the task to compose a minimum of one song per day. Romina Kalsi, who has been a SUISA member since 2014, was selected by those in charge of the camp and the summit, Fiona Schedler and Alexander Schedler, as one of the nine summit participants from Switzerland. Text by Erika Weibel

Schedler Music Summit 2018 with Romina Kalsi

Romina Kalsi, a young singer and songwriter from Ticino was one of the participants of the Schedler Music Summit 2018. From her first experience in an international songwriting camp, Romina brings...read more

Wanted: New member for the Distribution and Works Committee

Due to a mid-term resignation, a seat on SUISA’s Distribution and Works Committee needs to be filled. We are looking for a SUISA member who is a publisher, active in the rock/pop, jazz or electronic genre and originates from the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold

Wanted: New member for the Distribution and Works Committee

Bang in the midst of it rather than watching from the sidelines – SUISA is looking for a member that holds voting and election rights willing to co-design the distribution of collections in the Distribution and Works Committee. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

SUISA authors and publishers have the opportunity as members of the Distribution and Works Committee (VWK) to directly shape the distribution of the collections arising from works usage. The Distribution Regulations are the authoritative documentation governing the issue of who ultimately gets how much money and for which usage of their works. The Distribution Regulations are also the centre of attraction of the meetings of the VWK which takes place twice a year, where VWK members are presented with any pending changes in the rules for discussion and co-determination. The final resolution regarding the respective change shall be made by the Board.

Music genres, regions, authors and publishers – it’s all in the mix

Based on the above mentioned criteria regarding the search of a successor for the member that has stepped down, the goal is to ensure that the VWK’s composition is as balanced as possible in future since this is a central point for its work. In the Committee, there are thus many different music genres as well as all linguistic regions of Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein that must be represented. Furthermore, the VWK must consist of composers, music publishers as well as lyricists. Finally, the Committee should also exhibit the best possible mix regarding age and gender.

Further requirements for becoming a member of the VWK

Only SUISA members who hold a right to vote and elect can be appointed into the Committee. The (future) VWK member must – apart from the direct relationship to music – understand the effect of current decisions on the future. Members of the VWK may therefore not just focus on their own business areas, but must represent the interests of all authors and publishers. After all, being a Committee member takes time: The meetings of the VWK do take up a whole day (2x per annum) – including travel time and joint lunch. Members are also required to prepare accordingly for the meetings; this includes reading comprehensive and exhaustive materials which are provided in the run-up of the meeting.

Tasks of the distribution and works committee

A maximum of 22 members make up the VWK; they are elected for a term of four years by the General Assembly. The selection of the candidates proposed for election will be made by the Board. A re-election is limited to three terms in office.

The VWK fulfils the following tasks as per the SUISA Articles of Association by

  • checking the provisions of the Distribution Regulations and their implications on distribution proceeds;
  • proposing amendments to the Distribution Regulations to the Board;
  • as a first instance, handling appeals against Executive Committee decisions on the classification of broadcasting programmes, copyrightability of works and arrangement of non-protected works;
  • in an advisory capacity, evaluating unauthorised adaptations of protected works and cases of plagiarism.

The VWK is a Committee of the SUISA General Assembly. In other words: The General Assembly may allocate additional tasks to the Committee.

Candidate entries

Since the by-elections take place during the SUISA General Assembly on 22 June 2018 and the preparatory process does take up some time, we kindly ask interested candidates to send their application no later than Monday, 26 March 2018 to the following address:

SUISA, Stephanie Fikatas, Bellariastrasse 82, 8038 Zurich
E-mail: stephanie.fikatas (at) suisa (dot) ch

For further information please contact Mrs. Irène Philipp Ziebold, Director of Member Services and Distribution (Phone: +41 44 485 68 00).

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All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

Due to a mid-term resignation, a seat on SUISA’s Distribution and Works Committee needs to be filled. We are looking for a SUISA member who is a publisher, active in the rock/pop, jazz or electronic genre and originates from the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold

Wanted: New member for the Distribution and Works Committee

Bang in the midst of it rather than watching from the sidelines – SUISA is looking for a member that holds voting and election rights willing to co-design the distribution of collections in the Distribution and Works Committee. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

SUISA authors and publishers have the opportunity as members of the Distribution and Works Committee (VWK) to directly shape the distribution of the collections arising from works usage. The Distribution Regulations are the authoritative documentation governing the issue of who ultimately gets how...read more

2018 – a challenging year?!

Review of the Copyright Act, No-Billag-Initiative, online licensing, further development of “my account”… With such topics, SUISA continues to pursue the aim to offer its members efficient services and to create optimal framework conditions. We will face the challenge! By Irène Philipp Ziebold, Director

2018 – a challenging year?!

SUISA supports a NO to the No-Billag-Initiative: “If we did not do anything, we would not live up to our duties as a self-help organisation of music creators” writes Director Irène Philipp Ziebold. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

We want to continue to provide efficient services to our members in 2018 and to create optimal framework conditions for them. We have been pursuing these goals in a continuous process for quite a while. For this year we have made a clear note of these intentions and resolutions in our ‘to do’ notepads, since we are facing many challenges in 2018.

With respect to the framework conditions, for example, it is important that authors and publishers benefit better from the online usage of their works with the review of the Copyright Act, or that, in the interest of Swiss music, the reception fees made out of solidarity for public service media are not abolished. In an increasingly cross-border oriented competitive environment, it is, however, also of entrepreneurial importance to optimise the service range offered for members and customers alike.

Since December 2017, statements are made available via “my account”Since December 2017, statements are made available via “my account”
Thanks to the password-protected members’ area “my account”, our members can keep an overview of their distribution statements and distribution settlements. Many members asked us to stop the dispatch by post. We have taken this request into account and introduced the option to renounce on the postal dispatch. Read more

Something we at SUISA can determine as a Cooperative Society is whether a member can access its settlements via “my account”. Since December 2017, only those who have had access to “my account” have been receiving their distributions electronically. It is important in this context that we approach such developments in the interest of our members and never lose sight of the goal to offer high-quality efficient services. Driven by such a motivation, we have continued to improve our services for our members throughout the last few years.

Above and beyond that, we also have the duty as a collective management organisation for copyright to make social and political statements and to create optimal framework conditions as a consequence. Compared to the above mentioned “internal” processes and services, we cannot make the “right” decisions ourselves but influence matters so that the interests of our members are being taken seriously.

Copyright Act Review: Authors and publishers must benefit more from the online exploitation of their worksCopyright Act Review: Authors and publishers must benefit more from the online exploitation of their works
The Federal Council has adopted a dispatch on the new Copyright Act. SUISA is in principle content with the current version of the law. The solutions achieved in the working group for the Copyright Act (AGUR12 II) were implemented. In order for authors, performers, publishers and producers to benefit better from the digitisation, it is necessary to adopt important additions. Read more

We thus engage ourselves to ensure that the creatives, our members as the content suppliers for online platforms do not come out of this empty-handed and that they can expect a modern Copyright Act.

We therefore also support a NO to the No-Billag-Initiative. For many of our members, the public service idea, especially the opportunity to disseminate music and culture, is essential. In this case, the broadcasters of SRG SSR as well as the 35 state-licensed TV and radio stations play a fundamental role. If the reception fees made by Swiss households out of solidarity for their public service media would be abolished, then important platforms for our members for the dissemination of their works would fall away.

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Subsidised radio and TV broadcasters in Switzerland and Liechtenstein tend to create more broadcasting space for the music of SUISA members than privately financed channels. Moreover, the majority of the broadcasters supported by the Swiss Federation play more diverse music titles than their counterparts which are focussed on advertising revenue. In the interest of our local music creation and the cultural diversity, we therefore have to reject an abolition of the solidarity-based fees for public service media. Read more

SUISA therefore supports the activities of creators and artists and their associations such as Sonart – music creatives Switzerland, Suisseculture or the Swiss Music Council against No-Billag. If we did not do anything, we would not live up to our duties as a self-help organisation of music creators. And that’s why we take on the challenges 2018 is going to throw at us!

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All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

Review of the Copyright Act, No-Billag-Initiative, online licensing, further development of “my account”… With such topics, SUISA continues to pursue the aim to offer its members efficient services and to create optimal framework conditions. We will face the challenge! By Irène Philipp Ziebold, Director

2018 – a challenging year?!

SUISA supports a NO to the No-Billag-Initiative: “If we did not do anything, we would not live up to our duties as a self-help organisation of music creators” writes Director Irène Philipp Ziebold. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

We want to continue to provide efficient services to our members in 2018 and to create optimal framework conditions for them. We have been pursuing these goals in a continuous process for quite a while. For this year we have made a clear note of these intentions and resolutions in our ‘to do’...read more

Since December 2017, statements are made available via “my account”

Thanks to the password-protected members’ area “my account”, our members can keep an overview of their distribution statements and distribution settlements. Many members asked us to stop the dispatch by post. We have taken this request into account and introduced the option to renounce on the postal dispatch. Text by Claudia Kempf

Since December 2017, statements are made available via “my account”

SUISA members with access to the password-protected membership area have been informed via a personal infomail since December 2017 if a new settlement is available in “my account”. (Photo: Rawpixel / Shutterstock.com, edited by Manu leuenberger)

During autumn 2017, more than 14,000 members with access to “my account” were informed that they would only receive statements upon request in future. Only a minority have since asked for the postal dispatch. Online access to the distributions therefore corresponds to a requirement supported by the majority. The pdfs which are listed in a clear order and can be easily navigated as well as the overview of the annual remuneration is something that is appreciated by our members and that makes the postal dispatch obsolete for many.

With the fourth quarterly distribution dated 15 December 2017, registered users of “my account” will be informed in person for the first time when a new statement is available for download in “my account”. About half of all authors and publishers for whom a settlement had been created received an infomail and have checked their distributions directly via “my account”. Only 0.1% of the e-mails could not be delivered. The introduction of this new type of dispatch has thus been successfully introduced.

We do try to contact those members to whom we could not deliver the infomail – if possible – in person. If this is not possible, the access to “my account” is blocked and the member is requested in writing to provide a new, valid e-mail address. Please therefore remember to inform us of any changes to your e-mail address without any delay.

Do you also wish to be informed as soon as a new statement has been created for you? This is where you can order the access for your personal account: www.suisa.ch/my-account

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All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

Thanks to the password-protected members’ area “my account”, our members can keep an overview of their distribution statements and distribution settlements. Many members asked us to stop the dispatch by post. We have taken this request into account and introduced the option to renounce on the postal dispatch. Text by Claudia Kempf

Since December 2017, statements are made available via “my account”

SUISA members with access to the password-protected membership area have been informed via a personal infomail since December 2017 if a new settlement is available in “my account”. (Photo: Rawpixel / Shutterstock.com, edited by Manu leuenberger)

During autumn 2017, more than 14,000 members with access to “my account” were informed that they would only receive statements upon request in future. Only a minority have since asked for the postal dispatch. Online access to the distributions therefore corresponds to a requirement supported...read more