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The first year of SUISA Digital Licensing AG

A little more than one and a half years ago, SUISA founded its subsidiary company, SUISA Digital Licensing AG. The subsidiary company has now completed its first business year. A year which was under the auspices of development and brought about a multitude of new findings. It is time for retrospection and a first interim summary. Text by Fabian Niggemeier

The first year of SUISA Digital Licensing AG

The first business year of SUISA Digital Licensing AG was influenced by negotiations with many music service providers, successfully and jointly held with the SESAC Digital Licensing AG. (Photo: MichaelJayBerlin / Shutterstock.com)

By launching the subsidiary company, in short SUISA Digital, SUISA has outsourced cross-border and international online licensing in its entirety. SUISA is, from now, only responsible for the licensing of music uses on homepages and music services which only address a Swiss audience.

SUISA Digital’s responsibilities

SUISA has, for nearly six years, issued pan-European licences for online uses. In other words, the rights of SUISA members in the online world are not granted just for Switzerland, but directly for the whole of Europe. Thanks to the outstanding IT systems in this sector, SUISA was able to significantly increase the income of its members.

Another step followed in 2017: SUISA founded the Joint Venture, Mint Digital Services, with US collective management organisation SESAC. Until then, SUISA negotiated agreements with internet music providers (music service providers, abbreviated to MSPs) and managed the agreements itself upon their conclusion. With the creation of the Joint Venture, these two fundamental activities were split and outsourced. Mint Digital Services is responsible for the administration of the agreements i.e. the technical processing and invoicing in the name of the rights holders, whereas SUISA Digital is responsible for market monitoring, market penetration and the negotiation of the agreements. By way of another new introduction, the territory where the agreements apply was extended from Europe to nearly the whole world.

SUISA Digital is thus building a global licensing system and also offers this system to third parties. Collective management organisations from other countries can instruct SUISA Digital just like publishers can (for their Anglo-American repertoire), or authors from all over the world. That way, a cost-efficient management of rights can be ensured in the best possible manner.

Joint licences

SUISA Digital does not pursue this task by itself. It is in the interest of the rights holders as well as the MSPs to structure the negotiations in as efficient a manner as possible. That means to cover and govern as many rights as possible with as few agreements as possible. For this reason, SUISA Digital offers all MSPs to extend their agreements to the repertoire of SESAC Digital Licensing AG (in short: SESAC Digital). Provided that the MSP agrees, SUISA Digital and SESAC Digital jointly lead the negotiations and bundle their repertoire into a joint licence.

This is in the interest of the MSPs since it means they have to undertake less negotiation efforts, but also in the interest of SUISA Digital and SESAC Digital since a highly interesting “package” can be offered to the providers by joining up the repertoires. The advantage of this package is also that it does not just contain compositions which are used in Switzerland or Europe but also create a high demand globally.

The negotiations

At the end of 2017, a small but motivated team only focussed on preparing the negotiations. A multitude of information and figures had to be gathered and linked. Designing the agreement for areas outside Switzerland and Europe presented some challenges to the negotiation team. The parties agreed that the price of music should be linked mainly to the local significance of the music and the local buying power. It can thus be ensured that an adequate remuneration can be invoiced which remains affordable to the consumers.

Economic deliberations also made it clear that the big MSPs had to be approached first. The six biggest providers are responsible for 80% of the turnover. This statistical average does, of course, not apply for the music of all members: Those who are active in a specific music genre will at best have a bigger turnover on the platforms that focus specially on that genre. It was nevertheless paramount to prioritise the providers in line with their market share; knowing that certain big providers would be among the negotiation partners that would be harder to deal with.

Involving a mix of consistency, comprehension and rigour it was possible to make good progress in the negotiations. After twelve months, agreements could be entered into with all big MSPs or the negotiations are close to being concluded. Since these agreements are now ‘safe’, the next task is to complete the market penetration.

Until now, agreements with the following providers were jointly entered into with SESAC Digital:
YouTube, Spotify, Apple Music, Apple iTunes, Google Play, Deezer, Beatport, Facebook, Soundcloud, Melody VR, and Qobuz.

Joint negotiations are underway with the following providers:
Amazon, Napster, Tidal, Juke, 7Digital, dailymotion, Mixcloud, Red Karaoke, Soundtrack your Brand, What people play, Anghami, Auro, Bleep, Emoticast, Idagio, Smule, Xtendamix, Yousician, Better Day Wireless, DJ City, Juno, Linn Record, Musically, Recisio und Radionomy.

Add to that another approximately 20 MSPs from which feedback is due, as well as about 10 MSPs which are only active on a national level in the selected territories.

Distribution

As mentioned at the outset, the relevant agreements are processed and administered by the Joint Venture Mint Digital Services. The distribution of the income is, however, done by SUISA Digital and SUISA. A minimum of six months lies between the usage period and the distribution. The reason for this is that we do not represent the global repertoire, compared to the traditional offline sector. We can thus not invoice everything and then distribute, but only what we identify.

In this context, we depend on the collaboration by our members: The quicker they notify us of their works, the faster we can generate the invoices. For this reason, we are waiting between 60 and 100 days before we process the reports, depending on the MSP. That way, we can ensure that the majority of the new works and thus works with the highest usage levels has been registered and can be distributed by us. The distribution of the income is then made, at the latest, in the quarter after the payment from the MSPs has reached us.

There are going to be bigger settlements in due course. Since all agreements had to be renegotiated, no invoices could be sent out during the ongoing negotiations. In the cases of Spotify or Deezer, this led to the fact that the uses of the entire year 2018 were only invoiced at the beginning of 2019.

Outlook

During the second business year, SUISA Digital is going to focus firstly on achieving a coverage of the internet music market which is as complete as possible. Secondly, it is paramount that new markets, also outside of Europe, will be opened up and to ensure that SUISA members receive the remuneration they are due from anywhere in the world. For this purpose, we are constantly collaborating with Mint to improve systems and processes in order to continue providing our members with the best possible services in future.

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Stream ripping – tape recorders on the internetStream ripping – tape recorders on the internet Stream ripping software records audio and video streams. A copy of the entire stream can thus be saved as a file. Swiss copyright legislation provides for a private copy remuneration which is applicable to recording and storage media. Stream ripping apps are not covered by the statutory obligation to pay a levy – just like the tape recorders in the past. Read more
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  1. Walter Thut says:

    Guten Tag,
    einen Fall welcher mich und andere von der SUISA vertretene Komponisten betrifft, und die oben genannten Zeitverschiebungen bei den Abrechnungungen fuer Urheber stark in Frage stellt, moechte ich gerne hier beschreiben:

    Die Urheber des bei dere SUISA angemeldeten Songs BACK TO THE DIRTY TOWN haben viele Millionen Clicks uf Youtube, und viele Screenshots Belege dass dieser Song seit 2017 z.B. in der Schweiz, Frankreich und den USA dauernd Webungen vorgeschaltet hat.

    Leider haben die Urherber von der SUISA noch keine einzige Ueberweisung erhalten. Obwohl die SUISA uns vor mehr als einem Jahr bestatigt hat, dass sie cies Clicks auch erfasst haben, und dass wir Verguetungen von der SUISA bis spaetestens Ende 2018 bekommen werden, haben wir noch keine einzige Abrechung dazu, und keinen einzigen Rappen ueberwiesen erhalten.

    Bei unserem digitalen Vertrieb funktioniert hingegen die Abrechnung sehr gut, und liegt bei mehreren Tausend CHF pro Jahr.

    Was stimmt hier nicht?

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A little more than one and a half years ago, SUISA founded its subsidiary company, SUISA Digital Licensing AG. The subsidiary company has now completed its first business year. A year which was under the auspices of development and brought about a multitude of new findings. It is time for retrospection and a first interim summary. Text by Fabian Niggemeier

The first year of SUISA Digital Licensing AG

The first business year of SUISA Digital Licensing AG was influenced by negotiations with many music service providers, successfully and jointly held with the SESAC Digital Licensing AG. (Photo: MichaelJayBerlin / Shutterstock.com)

By launching the subsidiary company, in short SUISA Digital, SUISA has outsourced cross-border and international online licensing in its entirety. SUISA is, from now, only responsible for the licensing of music uses on homepages and music services which only address a...read more

No adequate share for audiovisual artists regarding video on demand and streaming success

Film director Ursula Meier is speeding from one success to the next, both in Switzerland as well as abroad. She elaborates why it is necessary to enhance the value of the position of film makers and actors in the video on demand (VOD) sector in the course of the copyright law review. Text/Interview by guest author Jürg Ruchti, CEO, SSA

No adequate share for audiovisual artists regarding video on demand and streaming success

Ursula Meier is a film director and a member of SSA. SSA is a sister society of SUISA and manages copyright for stage and audiovisual works. (Photo: Claude Dussez)

Ursula Meier, you are a member of the Société Suisse des Auteurs (SSA) – why?
Well, first and foremost because SSA looks after my copyright in an efficient manner. It also provides me with additional services: SSA is a cooperative society which is based on mutuality and solidarity and defends the interests of creators of audiovisual and stage works.

Creatives are asking for an implementation of new provisions regarding the video on demand (VOD) into the Swiss Copyright Act.
Yes, that’s very important. Thanks to the internet, our works are being consumed as often as never before but creatives are not paid to the extent that they would deserve. Digital economy players claim the income which have arisen from the consumption of our works but reject any obligations above and beyond that.

But isn’t it the case that authors negotiate their rights with the producer when they create a film?
Yes, but the contractual chains for the exploitation of the works are so complex and sometimes opaque that the income does actually not reach the artist or creator. There is a multitude of contracting parties. The digital economy leaves producers in an unprecedented state of uncertainty. They don’t know whether they’ll ever get their investment back. There are several reasons for that. This affects the levels of remuneration which they can grant artists during the contractual negotiations prior to the completion of a film. Our conditions have thus got worse.

Why should VOD platforms be obliged to remunerate authors via their collective management organisations?
Because if that were the case, authors would get a fair share of the success of their work, since their collective management organisations would get involved with the last player in the value chain i.e. the party which is in direct contact with the consumer. In the TV sector in Switzerland, this model has been established for quite some time and it works to our satisfaction. The current law does actually provide an obligation to pay for the rental of video tapes or DVDs. Since VOD has now taken over this market segment, the law should be adapted to this development.

The suggested new provision does, however, not seem to be beyond all doubt.
No, since it contains two contentious issues: First, it also affects music which does not want this provision since its system already works well in all countries. This is not the case for scriptwriters, directors and actors. A collective management of their rights only exists in few countries and the platforms often operate from other countries. The second issue which is problematic relates to works which are commissioned by TV broadcasters: The legislative draft provides for them to be excluded from the new mandatory remuneration for artists.

What exactly is the problem in the case of commissioned work?
These works are the most sought after works on this new market, for example series. The circle of principals has grown: In future, VOD platforms join TV broadcasters. There is no reason to treat the former in any other way than the latter. Works do follow a path. Sooner or later they can be consumed on a multitude of platforms. If commissioned works are being excluded from this new VOD right, authors do not receive any remuneration for their online exploitation. Their situation would therefore hardly improve. Here’s an example: A new series, commissioned by the RTS, which subsequently is made available via a streaming service such as Amazon would be exempt from the new legislation. This exclusion undermines the meaning of the new law and its general intention consequently misses the mark. The argument which forms the basis to this legal article does not reflect reality and I hope that this will be resolved in the course of the debates in the respective sessions.

About Ursula Meier
Ursula Meier is an internationally renowned film director. “Home” (with Isabelle Huppert) was among the nominated films at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival and received numerous international awards. In 2012, “L’enfant d’en haut” (with Léa Seydoux and Kacey Mottet Klein) was awarded the special prize Silberner Bär [Silver Bear] at the Berlinale [Berlin Film Festival]. Just like “Home”, in 2010, the film was given three Swiss film awards, among them the award for the best film, and it also represented Switzerland at the Oscars. At the beginning of 2018, Ursula Meier completed “Journal de ma tête”, a TV film with Fanny Ardant and Kacey Mottet Klein. The film was nominated for the Berlinale. Ursula Meier was the president of the jury for the Caméra d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival this year.
About the remuneration right for video on demand
Online platforms that make available feature films (cinema and TV) have replaced DVD rental. Whereas, under Article 13 FCA, authors and artists used to receive a share of DVD rental revenues, this is no longer the case for online availability. The revised legislation must ensure that authors and performing artists, as the primary creators of value, participate in this new economic model. Swisscopyright welcomed the introduction of a right to remuneration in Articles 13a and 35a FCA-B in principle. The collecting societies, however, underscored that the right to remuneration must be supplemental to the fees paid to the creators by producers (for the commissioning of works, the performances therein and the corresponding rights). The FCʼs proposal is not clear in this respect. Swisscopyright argues that the parliamentary debates must make it clear that the right to receive remuneration is supplemental to, and not in lieu of, such fees.
“The composers and publishers of film music entrust their rights to collective rights management societies like SUISA which act directly vis à vis the VoD platforms. The contractual system for music assures composers more favourable financial conditions than they would have under a statutory remuneration right.”
Moreover, the exclusion of music works from the new right to remuneration was an essential element of the AGUR 12 II compromise; regrettably, the FC has not included this exclusion in its proposal. Since the voluntary collective management model functions well in the music sector, we should come back to the solution advocated by AGUR12 II. The music and the audiovisual sector diverge significantly in this respect “The composers and publishers of film music entrust their rights to collective rights management societies like SUISA which act directly vis à vis the VoD platforms (alongside the aggregators who handle all other rights in the film). The contractual system for music assures composers more favourable financial conditions than they would have under a statutory remuneration right.
In the field of music, however, it is necessary to ensure that the revenues distributed by collecting societies are properly apportioned between the composer and the publisher. The composer must in any event receive an equitable share. Article 49(3) FCA already guarantees this for concerts, radio broadcasts and CD productions. But this rule only applies to areas under federal regulation, and therefore not to VoD. As a result, Swisscopyright proposes rewording paragraph 5 of Article 13a FCA-B to stipulate the composerʼs right to a fair share of the voluntary collective management revenues, in line with SUISAʼs current practice.
Excerpt from the SUISAblog-Article: “Copyright law revision: work starts in the parliamentary committees” by Vincent Salvadé.

The interview with Ursula Meier was conducted for the “Sessionsbrief” (session letter) (PDF, in German) of Swisscopyright, published in September 2018. Swisscopyright is the joint umbrella of the five Swiss collective management organisations ProLitteris, SSA, SUISA, Suissimage and Swissperform. With the “Sessionsbrief”, the societies inform interested parties from within the political scene as well as the public on subjects affecting copyright.

Swisscopyright Website

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Film director Ursula Meier is speeding from one success to the next, both in Switzerland as well as abroad. She elaborates why it is necessary to enhance the value of the position of film makers and actors in the video on demand (VOD) sector in the course of the copyright law review. Text/Interview by guest author Jürg Ruchti, CEO, SSA

No adequate share for audiovisual artists regarding video on demand and streaming success

Ursula Meier is a film director and a member of SSA. SSA is a sister society of SUISA and manages copyright for stage and audiovisual works. (Photo: Claude Dussez)

Ursula Meier, you are a member of the Société Suisse des Auteurs (SSA) – why?
Well, first and foremost because SSA looks after my copyright in an efficient manner. It also provides me with additional services: SSA is a cooperative society which is based on...read more

M4music copyright debate: Streaming = Goldmine?

At the M4music 2018, SUISA is going to hold a panel discussion on Streaming. Participants discuss, among other subjects, whether artists get their fair shares in a booming streaming market and – if not – what needs to change. Text by Erika Weibel

M4music copyright debate: Streaming = Goldmine?

The 21st M4music takes place between 22 and 24 March 2018. (Photo: M4music)

The turnover of Streaming providers are on the rise: Videos, text and lyrics, images and music files are used via the internet as intensively as never before. It’s not just authors of the works that benefit from this but also big players such as Google, Facebook etc. What does it look like in future if the value creation is mainly happening at the big internet companies while the providers of the contents i.e. the creators and artists remain empty-handed?

What would potential scenarios and paths that could guarantee a fair – or at least fairer – income for creators and artists?

We are looking forward to a large audience which is of course invited to participate in the conversation.

Event details:

Friday, 23 March 2018 at 5.00pm
Matchbox in the Schiffbau, Zurich

The panel will be held in German and translated into French.

The 21st M4music takes place between 22 and 24 March 2018. The pop music festival of the Migros-Kulturprozent in Lausanne and Zurich provides a diverse programme again: Concerts by over 50 national and international acts, panel discussions and workshops on current topics of the music business.

www.m4music.ch/en/conference

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Stream ripping – tape recorders on the internetStream ripping – tape recorders on the internet Stream ripping software records audio and video streams. A copy of the entire stream can thus be saved as a file. Swiss copyright legislation provides for a private copy remuneration which is applicable to recording and storage media. Stream ripping apps are not covered by the statutory obligation to pay a levy – just like the tape recorders in the past. Read more
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At the M4music 2018, SUISA is going to hold a panel discussion on Streaming. Participants discuss, among other subjects, whether artists get their fair shares in a booming streaming market and – if not – what needs to change. Text by Erika Weibel

M4music copyright debate: Streaming = Goldmine?

The 21st M4music takes place between 22 and 24 March 2018. (Photo: M4music)

The turnover of Streaming providers are on the rise: Videos, text and lyrics, images and music files are used via the internet as intensively as never before. It’s not just authors of the works that benefit from this but also big players such as Google, Facebook etc. What does it look like in future if the value creation is mainly happening at the big internet companies while the providers of the contents i.e. the creators and artists...read more

Changes to the distribution of collections for internet use

New distribution keys will be used for the distribution of collections for internet use (audio and video on demand offers). For downloads, a new key of 25% for performing rights and 75% for reproduction rights shall be applied. For streaming, the split shall consist of 75% performing rights and 25% reproduction rights. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold

Changes to the distribution of collections for internet use

SUISA changes its distribution keys for the income from streaming and downloads. (Photo: Rawpixel / Shutterstock.com)

For years, the distribution split between authors and publishers in terms of the allocation of the collections from performing and broadcasting rights on the one hand, and reproduction rights on the other hand has been agreed separately. SUISA has accordingly provided for different distribution keys in its distribution rules for the two rights categories.

For online uses, there is no separate distribution key which could be directly agreed on by the contracting parties. As a consequence, the collections from online uses are on the one hand distributed in analogy with the performing rights distribution key and on the other hand in accordance with the reproduction rights distribution key (cf. item 2.1.2 of the distribution rules).

Up to now, SUISA has been distributing 100% of collections from streaming in accordance with the distribution key for performing rights and 100% of collections for downloads in accordance with the distribution key for reproduction rights. This meant, however, that SUISA held a special position internationally and, at the same time, this practice no longer met the latest developments in the online sector.

New distribution keys for downloads and streaming

Apart from taking a look at the usual rules applicable abroad, technical procedures were also evaluated with a view to the analysis that led to the determination of the new distribution ratios of the distribution keys for download and streaming. Technically speaking, the making available of a work is based on the creation of a copy of the work on the server of the provider, the transmission of the copy to the consumer as well as the performance resp. potential storage on the terminal device of the consumer.

During discussions among the various committees (Distribution and Works Committee andBoard) with respect to the proposed changes, various views regarding the performing and reproduction rights shares existed with respect to the weighting of the distribution keys.

In particular the question arose how the aspect of transitoriness resp. repeated playback of a work should be considered for streaming, and which percentage should reflect this for the weighting of the performing share.

In the end, the following split was agreed:

  • Download: 25% of collections shall be allocated to the performing rights distribution key and 75% to the reproduction rights distribution key.
  • Streams: 75% of collections shall be allocated to the performing rights distribution key and 25% to the reproduction rights distribution key.

Distribution of the collections from video on demand (VOD)

At the same time, the provisions regarding the distribution of collections from video on demand were adjusted. The respective revenues shall now be distributed in analogy to download and streaming “per file” (per work). Prior to that, the revenues from video on demand had been supplemented to the remuneration for broadcasts of pay TV. The change now also permits in this sector that collections are distributed in a more exact and pinpointed manner.

For further information see the distribution rules of SUISA.

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New distribution keys will be used for the distribution of collections for internet use (audio and video on demand offers). For downloads, a new key of 25% for performing rights and 75% for reproduction rights shall be applied. For streaming, the split shall consist of 75% performing rights and 25% reproduction rights. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold

Changes to the distribution of collections for internet use

SUISA changes its distribution keys for the income from streaming and downloads. (Photo: Rawpixel / Shutterstock.com)

For years, the distribution split between authors and publishers in terms of the allocation of the collections from performing and broadcasting rights on the one hand, and reproduction rights on the other hand has been agreed separately. SUISA has accordingly provided for different distribution keys in its distribution rules for the two rights categories.

For online uses, there is no separate...read more

Copyright Act Review: Authors and publishers must benefit more from the online exploitation of their works

Last week, the Federal Council has adopted a dispatch on the new Copyright Act. SUISA is in principle content with the current version of the law. The solutions achieved in the working group for the Copyright Act (AGUR12 II) were implemented. In order for authors, performers, publishers and producers to benefit better from the digitisation, it is necessary to adopt important additions. The “Transfer of Value”, for example, is extremely disappointing for creators and artists: Internet giants’ platforms continue to be the ones that cash in on the online exploitation of music and films. Creators and artists – and thus the suppliers of the content – are almost left empty-handed. Text by Andreas Wegelin, CEO

The Copyright Act urgently requires provisions for the online exploitation of works protected by copyright. The value creation nowadays completely passes by creators and artists – and thus the producers of the content. It is especially the powerful internet industry that benefits strongly thanks to the revenue from advertising and usage data. (Image: yaichatchai / Shutterstock.com)

Many creators and artists, users’ associations and other target groups are likely to have received the current version of the Copyright Act with relief: The legal text is a giant step compared to the half-baked draft which the Federal Council had presented at the end of 2015, and which had caused nearly all interest groups to shake their heads. The outcome was that up to March 2016 a record number of more than 1,200 position papers were submitted. The working group on copyright AGUR12 II was also reactivated. We had already reported on this earlier this year, in March, via our SUISAblog.

Parliament supposed to blaze the trail for a modern Copyright Act

The working group is made up of creators and artists, producers, users, consumers, internet service providers, the Federal Office of Justice as well as additional representatives of the administration has obviously done a good job: In the current version, the proposals of the working group were adopted to a large extent. It is now down to the Parliament to blaze the trail for a modernised version of the Copyright Act. SUISA as well as other Swiss collective management organisations support the compromise.

This does, however, not mean that the current version does not need any improvements. On the contrary – the biggest problems of digitisation for creators and artists remains unsolved: Protected works in videos, texts, images and music data have never been used at the same intensity levels as they are today via the internet. Some major internet companies are the profiteers of this exploitation while the value creation almost completely passes by creators and artists – and thus the producers of the content.

Thanks to the internet: Music lovers can nowadays access an enormous number of films, music pieces, books and news articles, nearly from anywhere and at any time. There is no longer a need for physical work copies. The availability in the Cloud or access via streaming is now enough. Apart from online distributors such as Apple, Spotify, Netflix or Amazon, music and films are nowadays mainly shared via social media platforms such as YouTube or Facebook.

Many internet providers hardly take care of copyright

Online distributors usually take care of copyright and enter into licensing agreements with producers and collective management organisations. This leads to musicians, producers and other creators and artists to receive a remuneration for their work. In the case of intermediaries, e.g. social media platforms and aggregators such as Tunein, the situation is different. The technical services they offer also allow users to disseminate works protected by copyright. In such models where protected content is shared, the providers hardly look after the copyright. On the contrary: They regularly pass the responsibility on to the users who upload the contents.

Add to that the fact that social media platforms and aggregators are the competitors of online distributors such as iTunes or Spotify – they yield high financial gains without participating the authors adequately. A European study shows that value added for the operators of such platforms is very high thanks to works such as music and films protected by copyright. 18% of Google’s income, for example, is made on the back of protected works e.g. via sponsored links. If the protected works were to fall away, the click rate and therefore the attractiveness of the search engine would drop. The value creation on platforms such as YouTube is even higher – they yield 2/3 of their turnover with contents protected by copyright – mainly from advertising, but also sales of profile data. They do, however, defer the act of clearing the copyright to those uploading the contents, even though the latter are not even in a position to do so.

A discussion on the Transfer of Value must also take place in Switzerland

Authors, the actual creators of the works, receive no or hardly any remuneration at all in the case of such platforms. This calls for urgent action. In the EU there has been a discussion on the Transfer of Value on the internet for quite some time. It is therefore high time to bring this discussion to Switzerland. Urgent measures are needed in Switzerland so that the transfer of value away from authors can be stopped – and therefore the creeping expropriation of creators and artists. Social media platforms, aggregators and search engine operators must be obligated to pay a compensation for the works used via their technical platforms.

SUISA and other Swiss collective management organisations are therefore going to introduce these important additions to the legislative process. Creators and artists must get a fairer share in the value creation on online platforms.

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  1. sam says:

    danke für ihren einsatz

  2. Stevens says:

    They stole our revolution and now they steal our music.

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Last week, the Federal Council has adopted a dispatch on the new Copyright Act. SUISA is in principle content with the current version of the law. The solutions achieved in the working group for the Copyright Act (AGUR12 II) were implemented. In order for authors, performers, publishers and producers to benefit better from the digitisation, it is necessary to adopt important additions. The “Transfer of Value”, for example, is extremely disappointing for creators and artists: Internet giants’ platforms continue to be the ones that cash in on the online exploitation of music and films. Creators and artists – and thus the suppliers of the content – are almost left empty-handed. Text by Andreas Wegelin, CEO

The Copyright Act urgently requires provisions for the online exploitation of works protected by copyright. The value...read more

SUISA expects significant rise in streaming collections

At the top of the agenda for the SUISA Board meeting in December 2016 was the budget for the following financial year. It was with satisfaction that the Board established a continuation of the positive developments from the past years in relation to the collections (+3.2%). Expenditure remains stable and the distributable amount increases slightly (+2.91%). Report from the Board by Dora Zeller

SUISA expects significant rise in streaming collections

The remuneration pot for streaming exploitations is expected to fill up for authors and publishers even more: In its budget for financial year 2017, SUISA expects an increase in the online sector income of +13.4% compared to the previous year. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

The budget for financial year 2017 includes higher collections arising from broadcast and performing rights as well as compensation claims. An increase of approx. 11% is expected from tariffs CT 4i (smart phones) and CT 12 (set top boxes rental). A significant rise is also expected in the online sector, especially streaming (+13.4%). Due to the market developments, it is expected that reproduction rights are due to decrease (-3.8%). Regarding income from abroad, the amounts in the budget are also lower than previously (-4.5%).

Board and Management of SUISA also plan long-term: Apart from the roadmap for 2017, financial planning and strategy until 2020 were discussed. The Board discussed and ratified the drafts presented by Management.

Cost deductions stay the same

Another recurring agenda item for the end of the year are the cost deductions. The Board resolves which deductions will be taken in the subsequent year from collections in the current year. For Switzerland and the online sector, the percentages are between 10 and 15% just like in the previous year. An exception are the cost rates for the reproduction sector, in particular tariffs PI and VI which are subject to the Cannes Agreement (7.025% and 9.025%).

Furthermore, the percentage deducted from income from abroad in the last few years on the basis of reciprocal representation agreements was examined. Since various sister societies apply higher deductions, the pros and cons of an increase were thoroughly considered. The Board members decided, however, to keep deduction levels at 4%.

Benvenuti a Lugano

For the autumn meetings 2017, the Board members of SUISA will not travel to Lausanne, as they did before, but to Lugano instead. Why not hold the General Assembly in the Italian-speaking part of Switzerland? In line with SUISA’s planning it could happen in 2021.

By-elections in the Distribution and Works Committee

Alex Kirschner, composer for advertising and film music, steps back from his post in the Distribution and Works Committee (VWK) in summer 2017. Jonas Zellweger – SUISA member since 2009 – applies for the vacant seat; he is active in the same music category. The Board is going to unanimously propose his candidature to the General Assembly for election.

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Stream ripping – tape recorders on the internet – Stream ripping software records audio and video streams. A copy of the entire stream can thus be saved as a file. Swiss copyright legislation provides for a private copy remuneration which is applicable to recording and storage media. Stream ripping apps are not covered by the statutory obligation to pay a levy – just like the tape recorders in the past. Read more
General Assembly 2016 of the Cooperative Society SUISA in the Paul Klee Centre – 217 composers, lyricists and publishers of music have taken part in the SUISA General Assembly on 24 June 2016 in Berne in order to execute their right of co-determination on their cooperative. In addition to the guest speech by SRG Director General Roger de Weck, the foundation award ceremony and the composer in residence allocation of the FONDATION SUISA, the amendment of the Pension Fund Regulations was the central issue. Read more
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At the top of the agenda for the SUISA Board meeting in December 2016 was the budget for the following financial year. It was with satisfaction that the Board established a continuation of the positive developments from the past years in relation to the collections (+3.2%). Expenditure remains stable and the distributable amount increases slightly (+2.91%). Report from the Board by Dora Zeller

SUISA expects significant rise in streaming collections

The remuneration pot for streaming exploitations is expected to fill up for authors and publishers even more: In its budget for financial year 2017, SUISA expects an increase in the online sector income of +13.4% compared to the previous year. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

The budget for financial year 2017 includes higher collections arising from broadcast and performing rights as well as compensation claims. An increase of approx. 11% is expected...read more

Stream ripping – tape recorders on the internet

Stream ripping software records audio and video streams. A copy of the entire stream can thus be saved as a file. Swiss copyright legislation provides for a private copy remuneration which is applicable to recording and storage media. Stream ripping apps are not covered by the statutory obligation to pay a levy – just like the tape recorders in the past. Text by Manu Leuenberger

Stream ripping works just like a tape recorder on the internet: Audio and video streams can be recorded in their entirety by means of an application. The statutory obligation to pay a levy exists pursuant to Swiss copyright law for the resulting reproduction on the storage medium, but not for the actual software. (Photo: Evgeniy Yatskov / Shutterstock.com)

The consumers are happy: Thanks to streaming, music collections, video shop stock, radio and TV transmissions are available – always and anywhere. All you need is an internet connection. Contents which are otherwise only available online are now also accessible offline due to stream ripping. Special software applications for this purpose make it possible to create complete copies of the streamed audio or video files on a storage medium. The saved file can then also be played back without an internet connection.

From a technical perspective, a permanent flow of data packets is being transmitted via an internet connection from a server to a receiving device. Receiving devices can be smartphones, tablets or computers, for example. The incoming data packets are played back via such devices by means of a stream player software as a continuous music piece or video. After playback, the data packets are deleted on the receiving device at once.

A stream ripping application thus allows a tape-recording of such audio and video streams, as it were. Such applications store the data packets from the streaming service permanently on the receiving device. Put together, the data packets stored in the memory of the target device result in a complete copy of the audio or video file retrieved from the streaming service.

Remuneration for private copies for authors

You could also refer to the stream ripping application as a recording software. The functionality corresponds to that of a tape recorder. Instead of an audio or video tape, the content is recorded onto a storage medium as a file. The final result is a copy of the played, transmitted, or streamed original.

The possibility to make tons of music copies on audio tapes led to private copying to be anchored into legislation nearly 25 years ago. Since then, it is permitted in line with the Swiss Copyright Act to make copies of protected works for the use in people’s private circles or home life. In return, rights holders have a statutory entitlement to receive a remuneration for such private copies.

Such a remuneration or levy must be paid by the manufacturers and importers of the recording and storage devices. The levies are collected by the Swiss collective management organisations (CMOs) and distributed to the rightsholders. The selection of blank media carriers subject to a levy has increased due to technological developments from audio and video tapes via CD/DVD blanks to digital memory in MP3 players, smartphones and tablets.

Blank media levies apply for recording and storage media

The statutory duty to pay a levy only applies to recording and storage media. In the analogue example, the recording medium would be the tape, not the tape recorder. In the digital equivalent, the blank media carrier is the storage item. The recording software is the recorder.

Since the law only covers blank data carriers, levies for private copying cannot be claimed and collected from the makers of stream ripping applications. For the same reason it is not possible to claim levies from the providers of such applications i.e. the operators of software or app stores. They do not qualify as importers of a recording or storage medium, but as software sellers.

The stream ripping software as a product meanwhile depends on the contents of third parties. That’s nothing new, as it was the same case with tape recorders back in the day. Whether someone records music from a vinyl on to a tape or an audio or video stream onto a digital storage medium: It always involves the creation of a copy. For such reproductions to be used for private purposes, the so-called blank media levy was introduced in Switzerland. On the basis of this levy, authors, publishers and producers of music and films get their due remuneration for the copies that are being made.

Stream ripping – an obsolescent model?

Users of stream ripping applications should be aware that they might infringe the usage conditions of streaming platforms. There are providers which permit only the streaming as per their terms and conditions, but no downloads or copying of the music tracks or videos. A potential consequence of a detected infringement could be that the personal user account is blocked or deleted.

The propagation of subscriptions for (mainly mobile) internet access without any limitations of the data volume could have an impact on the usage of stream ripping applications anyway. If the capacities are not limited, it is possible to constantly access streaming platforms. This could reduce the demand to copy audio and video streams and save them locally for offline use.

Legal streaming services pay licence fees for authors’ rights

On top of that, the legal offer of the streaming providers has become so comprehensive in the meantime that the consumer demand for niche repertoire can be satisfied much better. Furthermore, streaming services such as Tidal, Apple Music, Spotify or Google Play Music offer functions to listen to the music offline as an integrated part of their subscriptions. Stream ripping apps are therefore no longer necessary to locally store personal music preferences for offline usage.

Said legal streaming providers also conclude licensing agreements with the CMOs and pay licence fees for the copyright in question. Composers, lyricists and publishers of the used music thus participate in the collections from the streaming services.

After all, this is something any music or film lover should definitely know: If you buy a streaming app, you pay the software provider, not the creators and artists whose works you would like to listen to or watch.

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Stream ripping software records audio and video streams. A copy of the entire stream can thus be saved as a file. Swiss copyright legislation provides for a private copy remuneration which is applicable to recording and storage media. Stream ripping apps are not covered by the statutory obligation to pay a levy – just like the tape recorders in the past. Text by Manu Leuenberger

Stream ripping works just like a tape recorder on the internet: Audio and video streams can be recorded in their entirety by means of an application. The statutory obligation to pay a levy exists pursuant to Swiss copyright law for the resulting reproduction on the storage medium, but not for the actual software. (Photo: Evgeniy Yatskov / Shutterstock.com)

The consumers are happy: Thanks to streaming, music collections, video...read more

First distribution of collections arising from the Youtube agreement

With its online settlementof June 2015, SUISA distributes collections based on the Youtube agreement for the first time. Income from 5 quarters is included in the payout. The total distributed amount is roughly CHF 300,000. The aim is not just to pay out for titles with advertising turnover but for all used and identifiable works, depending on the click rate. Text by Andreas Wegelin, CEO

First distribution of collections arising from the Youtube agreement

According to the reports on music use by Youtube, music from SUISA members is mainly played in the following countries outside Switzerland: Germany, France, Poland, Italy and Great Britain. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

The agreement between SUISA and Youtube has now been running in its second year. The agreement covers direct licensing for exploitations in 43 countries. It does, of course, cover the usages in Switzerland. For the repertoire of SUISA members, the usage from 42 additional countries is being licensed. The territory covered by the agreement includes, apart from the whole of Europe, also countries in Asia and Africa.

With its online distribution of June 2015, SUISA distributes collections based on the Youtube agreement for the first time. These licence fees and usage reports have been submitted since the beginning of the agreement from autumn 2013 to the end of 2014. From the respective 5 quarters, a total amount of about CHF 300,000 is available for distribution.

Elaborate development of the reporting system

Videos with musical contents as well as films created by users themselves with music in the background (“user generated content”) are accessible via the Youtube platform. The elaboration of a suitable reporting system with the new contractual partner turned out to be complex. The basic principle of the reporting process applied at Youtube is explained in the SUISAblog article “Why SUISA members do not have to submit registrations, if their works are on Youtube”.

The main challenge for the processing of the usage reports submitted by Youtube is not just the enormous data volume but also the data quality – especially that of the “user generated content”. Videos by private users hardly contain information on the used (music) material. This segment, which Youtube calls “non music”, could not be identified due to a lack of exact data. As a consequence, no money will be allocated to these segments.

Things are different, however, for the so-called “music” segments: For the 15-month distribution period, SUISA has processed reports on music use by Youtube with approximately 3.2m different videos, with a total of 1.7bn clicks between them. Of the latter, 590.2m clicks relate to the repertoire distributed by SUISA.

Distribution of Youtube collections

Wherever it was possible to directly link advertising revenue to a video with identified music the income will be distributed for this video, resp. the music contained therein. This means: A music video has generated income via advertising. The video contains a single work which could be identified by a music usage report from Youtube and is has a complete registration in the SUISA works database. The income generated by the video will be paid out to the rights holders of the individual video.

Further works in videos from the “music” segment, which could be identified, obtain a share of the remaining income from the Youtube agreement in line with their click rate. The distribution amount per click for the distribution period is CHF 0.0008. In comparison, SUISA could pay out an average amount of CHF 0.0018 per stream in the second Spotify distribution which is also taking place now, i.e. more than twice as much.

Just like the contracts with other online music providers, the Youtube agreement will be subject to a periodic review. The impending negotiations to renew the agreement will provide an opportunity to hold discussions on the reporting of data for the identification of the music contents of our repertoire and of course the financial conditions of the licence for Youtube. So that authors will get their fair share for the usage of their works on the biggest global video platform.

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With its online settlementof June 2015, SUISA distributes collections based on the Youtube agreement for the first time. Income from 5 quarters is included in the payout. The total distributed amount is roughly CHF 300,000. The aim is not just to pay out for titles with advertising turnover but for all used and identifiable works, depending on the click rate. Text by Andreas Wegelin, CEO

First distribution of collections arising from the Youtube agreement

According to the reports on music use by Youtube, music from SUISA members is mainly played in the following countries outside Switzerland: Germany, France, Poland, Italy and Great Britain. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

The agreement between SUISA and Youtube has now been running in its second year. The agreement covers direct licensing for exploitations in 43 countries. It does, of course, cover the usages in Switzerland. For the repertoire...read more

Questions and answers on the licensing agreement between SUISA and Youtube

On 25 September 2013, SUISA and YouTube have announced the signature of a licensing agreement. Here are some Q&As regarding the SUISA/Youtube deal.

Questions and answers on the licensing agreement between SUISA and YouTube

SUISA/Youtube deal: Remuneration for the creative work of Swiss music authors on the biggest online video platform in the world. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

Why have SUISA and YouTube entered into a licensing agreement?
SUISA represents the copyright of many musical composers and lyricists from all over the world. On behalf of all of these composers and authors, SUISA is making sure that a remuneration is paid whenever their music is played, broadcast or performed in Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Playing, broadcasting and copying music is also referred to as music usage.

Most videos on YouTube can be viewed by any interested person at any time and from anywhere. In other words: YouTube makes the videos available for a usage outside your domestic and private circle. The website operator, YouTube, requires a permission from the authors in order to make videos available irrespective of time and place.

As it happens, many videos shown on YouTube contain music or are actually music videos. For music usage outside people’s domestic and private circle, music authors are entitled to receive a remuneration from the website operator. As YouTube is making money with its video platform by means of advertising, for example, this is even more pertinent. The more a YouTube website is retrieved the more money YouTube can make by means of advertising.

In order for internet user to watch videos on YouTube often and for long periods of time, the website needs entertaining contents. One component of the contents is the music in videos. A lot of music in the videos on YouTube stems from composers and lyricists whose copyright SUISA manages in Switzerland.

The agreement between SUISA and YouTube mainly governs that the authors represented by SUISA receive a remuneration for the usage of their music on YouTube.ch. In return, YouTube receives the permission, i.e. licence to make their music contained in the respective videos available.

How did the agreement with YouTube come about?
SUISA is glad to have reached an agreement with YouTube in the interest of its members after lengthy negotiations. Besides SUISA, YouTube has concluded contracts with major collective management organisations in Europe such as PRS for Music (Great Britain), SACEM (France), SGAE (Spain) and SIAE (Italy).

How much money does YouTube pay to SUISA per ‘click’ on a video?
There are several reasons the licence fee amounts cannot be revealed. On the one hand, SUISA is bound to a contractual non-disclosure agreement. On the other hand – that much can be revealed – the total amount of the paid licence fees depends on the turnover YouTube generates. The video platform mainly generates income via advertising.

As announced in the press release, the agreement enters into force from 01 September 2013. It therefore only covers videos that were accessed (or clicked on) after that date. YouTube is going to regularly provide SUISA with statistics on the used videos in future. The usage statistics show which works have actually been used and how often they were used. Based on these details, the remuneration share per individual work will be calculated.

As soon as the first statistics provided by YouTube have reached us, we can execute this calculation for the first time. After that, SUISA will pass on the money collected from YouTube to the authors of the respective works. SUISA is planning to distribute the royalties on a biannual basis.

How does the agreement influence the availability of YouTube videos in Switzerland?
Subject to the agreement, SUISA can only grant such usage rights which it is actually entitled to manage. SUISA does not represent the entire scope of copyright of each and every author in the world. Rights not managed by SUISA are therefore not covered by the agreement in question. SUISA has no influence how the copyright not covered by the agreement for YouTube is managed.

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  1. Meltzer says:

    Liebe Suisa,

    darf man Filme von Youtube, die im Handel nicht erhältlich sind, auch in einer Schule für den Unterricht verwenden)
    Filme (DVDs und CDs) dürfen ja auschnittsweise vervielfältigt und auf einer Schulinternen Plattform zur Verfügung gestellt werden.

    Wie sieht es jedoch mit Filmen von Youtube aus?

    Herzlichen Dank
    Freundliche Grüsse

    Pascal

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Lieber Pascal

      Im Rahmen des gesetzlich erlaubten Schulgebrauchs ist grundsätzlich jede auszugsweise Werkverwendung – und somit auch das Bereitstellen von Auszügen von Youtube-Videos auf einer schulinternen Plattform – erlaubt (vgl. Art. 19 Abs. 1 lit. b & Abs. 3 lit a). Ausschlaggebend ist dabei, dass die schulinterne Plattform ausschliesslich von der Schüler- und Lehrerschaft benutzt werden kann und dass die Schule eine Vergütung gemäss dem Gemeinsamen Tarif 7 an die Pro Litteris bezahlt.

      Viele Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger / SUISA Kommunikation

  2. Daniel says:

    Vielleicht eine dumme Frage:
    Aus nicht Musikersicht heisst das wenn ich zB eine kleine Bar betreibe und Musik ausschliesslich von Youtube abspiele müsste ich keine separaten SUISA-Beiträge bezahlen.
    Bei einem DJ wäre dies anders. Ist dies so richtig ?

    • Nein, dem ist nicht so. Jede Verwendung von Musik zur Unterhaltung der Gäste in einer öffentlich zugänglichen Bar ist vergütungspflichtig, egal aus welcher Quelle die Musik stammt. Denn YouTube erwirbt im Vertrag mit der SUISA nur das Recht, Werke aus dem Repertoire der SUISA auf der Videoplattform zugänglich zu machen. Weitere urheberrechtlich relevante Nutzungen, wie etwa das öffentliche Abspielen von Videos, werden von diesem Vertrag nicht erfasst. Wenn also YouTube-Videos in einer Bar als Quelle für Hintergrundmusik verwendet werden, hat der Betreiber der Bar eine entsprechende Erlaubnis bei der SUISA einzuholen. In diesem Fall richtet sich die Urheberechtsentschädigung für die Hintergrundmusik nach dem gemeinsamen Tarif 3a (GT 3a). Somit sind sowohl das öffentliche Abspielen von YouTube-Videos wie auch die Musiknutzung an einem DJ-Event durch die SUISA zu lizenzieren. Der Unterschied liegt darin, dass beim DJ-Event ein anderer Tarif zur Anwendung kommt, da es sich hier nicht um Hintergrundmusik handelt, sondern um Musik zu Tanz und Unterhaltung (GT H).
      Martin Korrodi, Abteilungsleiter Aufführungsrechte, SUISA

  3. Daniel says:

    Also, verstehe ich das richtig:

    Wenn ich als Musiker z.B. für mein Portfolio ein Video mit einem Cover eines Songs (von mir gespielt/gesungen) auf Youtube hochlade, muss ich mich nur noch um die Synchronisationsrechte kümmern? Die Urheberrechte, welche über die SUISA abgerechnet werden, sind somit per Pauschalvertrag bereits geregelt?

    Vielen Dank für eine kurze Rückmeldung.

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Durch den Vertrag zwischen SUISA und Youtube wird grundsätzlich das Zugänglichmachen auf der Plattform Youtube für die Urheber abgegolten. Darin nicht eingeschlossen sind jedoch die nötigen Vervielfältigungsrechte am musikalischen Werk für die Herstellung des Films, welche gemäss Tarif VN der SUISA lizenziert werden. Die Synchronisationsrechte müssen separat bei den jeweiligen Rechteinhabern (Urheber/Verlag) bezogen werden. Zudem stellt sich bei Coversongs die Frage, ob es sich tatsächlich um ein Cover oder um eine Bearbeitung handelt. Diesbezüglich sollte Folgendes beachtet werden: Das blosse Spielen von akkustischen Akkorden mit Verzierungen zur originalen Gesangslinie stellt noch keine Bearbeitung dar, sondern gilt in der Regel als «Cover». Sobald Sie aber die Gesangslinie und Akkordprogressionen abändern, befinden Sie sich im Bereich der «Bearbeitung». Damit eine Bearbeitung überhaupt veröffentlicht bzw. öffentlich genutzt werden darf, muss immer zuerst eine Bearbeitungserlaubnis beim Verlag oder, wenn das Originalstück nicht verlegt ist, beim Urheber eingeholt werden. Bearbeitungen sind urheberrechtlich selbstständig geschützt, wenn eine Bearbeitungserlaubnis vorliegt.
      Manu Leuenberger / SUISA Kommunikation

  4. Christian Pastor says:

    Liebes Suisa Team,

    was muss ich denn tun, wenn jemand meine Texte ohne mein Wissen nutzt und auf You Tube veröffentlicht?

  5. Christian says:

    Ich nehme ein Beispiel, um Fragen zu stellen:
    Mein Chor bringt einen CD heraus. Teile dieses CD ist in einem Video gebraucht und dieses Video geht auf Internet:
    – Wie ist meine Musik bei Youtube erkannt, wenn niemand sagt, dass meine Musik gebraucht wurde (Audio Vergleich ?)
    – Wenn ich das Video lege, wie kann ich machen (z.B. Musik ID geben), dass die Musik meines Video bei Youtube richtig erkannt wird?
    – Wer bekommt dann die Gebühren : Der Komponist ? Der Chor ? Editor/CD Hersteller ?

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Lieber Christian

      Vielen Dank für Deine Fragen. Zu Deinem geschilderten Beispiel können wir Folgendes sagen:

      – Grundsätzlich hat bei einer Nutzung sowohl der Urheber (Komponist) als auch der Chor (Interpret) und der Produzent (CD-Herausgeber, Plattenfirma) eine Vergütung zugut. Die SUISA ist nur für die Vergütung der Urheber, also der Komponisten und Textautoren zuständig. Die Leistungsschutzrechte, also die Rechte der Interpreten und Produzenten, werden nicht über die SUISA abgegolten.
      – YouTube verfügt über eine Fingerprint-Software, die Musik in Videos automatisch erkennen soll. Dieses System heisst bei YouTube «Content-ID». Du findest darüber Informationen auf den Hilfeseiten von YouTube.
      – Nur die Rechteinhaber der Aufnahme können eine Audio-Referenzdatei in das Content-ID-System hochladen. Den Zugang zum Content-ID-System vergibt YouTube selektiv. Das heisst: Zum Beispiel haben viele Plattenfirmen Berechtigung, etwas hochzuladen, weil sie eben in der Regel die Rechte an den Aufnahmen besitzen. Ansonsten habe auch einige Digitale Musik-Distributoren Zugang zum Content-ID-System. Solche Distributoren findest Du im Internet, indem Du z.B. nach den Stichworten «online music distribution» (oder ähnlich) suchst.
      – Wenn die Aufnahme vom Content-ID-System von YouTube richtig identifiziert werden konnte und YouTube mit dem Video, in dem die Musik enthalten ist, (Werbe-)Umsatz erzielt, zahlt YouTube einen Anteil des Umsatzes als Vergütung aus sowohl an die Urheber (über die SUISA) als auch an die Interpreten und die Produzenten (nicht über die SUISA).

      Wir hoffen, Dir mit diesen Infos etwas weitergeholfen zu haben, und wünschen Dir viel Erfolg mit Deinem Chor.

      Viele Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger / Kommunikation SUISA

  6. Linus says:

    Guten Tag
    Verstehe ich das richtig, für unsere Inhalte, die ausserhalb der Schweiz abgespielt werden, erhalten wir nichts?
    Oder habe ich das falsch verstanden?
    Freundliche Grüsse
    Linus

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Lieber Linus
      Zuerst einmal bitten wir für unsere verspätete Antwort um Entschuldigung.
      Zu Deiner Frage: Durch den Vertrag mit Youtube ist das Repertoire der SUISA-Mitglieder für die Nutzung auf der Video-Plattform in einer Vielzahl von Ländern lizenziert (siehe dazu auch unsere Medienmitteilung zum Vertragsabschluss vom 25.9.2013: http://www.suisa.ch/de/news/news-archiv/news/article/2013/09/25/suisa-und-youtube-einigen-sich-auf-lizenzvertrag/). Konkret gilt der Vertrag neben Nutzer-Zugriffen von Schweizer IP-Adressen auch für Zugriffe u.a. aus dem Gebiet der EU, EFTA, EWR und weiteren Ländern ausserhalb der Schweiz. Für Nutzungen in diesen vertraglich vereinbarten Ländern werden allfällige Vergütungen von Youtube direkt an die SUISA ausbezahlt und von uns an die Rechteinhaber weitergeleitet.
      Nochmals sorry für die späte Antwort und viele Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger / Kommunikation SUISA

  7. Marc says:

    Grundsätzlich ist der Vertragsabschluss mit YouTube positiv… aber leider auch sehr intransparent.

    Mich würde interessieren, wie die SUISA den Datenabgleich vornimmt. Wie erkennt die SUISA dass eines der Werke der SUISA Mitglieder z.B. in einem DJ Set Standbild Video vorkommt?

    Vermutlich gar nicht, da YouTube keine Daten über den Inhalt erfassen lässt. Somit kann auch nicht abgerechnet werden. Bei den Werken welche selber hochgeladen werden kann auch keine Mitglieder Nr. hinterlegt werden.

    Wo ist die Magie, welche aus dem YouTube Video Namen den Link zu uns Mitglieder herstellt?

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Lieber Marc

      Danke für deinen Kommentar.

      Zu deiner Frage zum Datenabgleich: YouTube stellt uns Nutzungsmeldungen zu. Anhand dieser Nutzungsmeldungen identifizieren wir das von der SUISA vertretene Repertoire. Die Meldungen enthalten Werk-/Songtitel, Künstlernamen, Albumtitel plus optionale weitere Angaben wie Labels, ISRC/ISWC-Nr., UPC-Code, sofern diese bekannt sind.

      Nach den ersten Erkenntnissen bestehen die Daten der Nutzungsmeldungen aus Informationen, die YouTube über das Partnerprogramm erhält. Dazu gehört das YouTube-eigene Content-ID-System, das hauptsächlich durch Informationen von Labels gespiesen wird. Bekannt ist auch, dass YouTube über eine Inhaltserkennungsoftware verfügt, die Video- und Audiospuren analysieren kann.

      Die Qualität der Daten von Nutzungsmeldungen ist immer stark vom Kunden abhängig. Es ist auch bei anderen Kunden ein mehr oder weniger langer und ständiger Prozess, die Meldungen so weit wie möglich auf unsere Bedürfnisse hin zu optimieren. Im Fall von YouTube kommt hinzu, dass der Vertrag neu ist. Das Prozedere für das Reporting wird im Moment abgeklärt und befindet sich bis zur ersten Abrechnung (voraussichtlich 2014) in Entwicklung.

      Freundliche Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger / Kommunikation SUISA

      • Marc says:

        Hallo und danke für den Feedback

        Das mit dem YouTube Partnerprogramm und der ContentID ist so ne Sache. Für eine ContentID darf man sich bewerben (meine ist noch unbeantwortet). Eine ContentID zu erhalten ist – so schreibt das YouTube – keine Garantie.

        Wurde von der SUISA sichergestellt dass wir Mitglieder eine ContentID erhalten?

        Falls dem nicht so ist, bitte ich um eine offizielle Information, dass der Vertrag mit YouTube nur von einem selektiven SUISA Mitgliederkreis genutzt werden kann, der gemäss Vertrag natürlich auch geheim ist.

        Gruss
        -Marc

        • Erika Weibel says:

          Lieber Marc
          Selbstverständlich nützt die Vereinbarung mit YouTube nicht nur einem selektiven Kreis von SUISA Mitgliedern, sondern es wird für all unsere Mitglieder lizenziert.
          Zurzeit arbeiten wir an einem YouTube-Ratgeber für unsere Mitglieder. Dort werden wir pragmatisch erläutern, wie sie vorgehen müssen, damit ihre Werke auf YouTube getagged werden können. So können Sie sicherstellen, dass Google uns die kompleten Daten für eine korrekte Abrechnung liefern kann. Den Ratgeber werden wir hier auf dem SUISAblog veröffentlichen. Bis wir alle Erkenntnisse dafür verarbeitet haben, bitten wir um etwas Geduld.
          Freundliche Grüsse
          Erika Weibel / Kommunikation SUISA

  8. Bonjour,
    Une deuxième question pratique se pose. Si nous avons bien compris, SUISA licencie en faveur de YouTube les oeuvres de son répertoire. Cela ne vaut-il que pour le site YouTube.com/ch ou pour YouTube.com en général ?

    Si cela ne vaut que pour YouTube.com/ch, SUISA pourrait-elle renseigner ses membres sur les situations ayant cours à l’étranger et le cas échéant communiquer les éventuelles instructions pour les cas où les membres SUISA doivent prendre des disposition ?

    Mille mercis d’avance et cordiales salutations.

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Cher Eric

      Un point au préalable: le contrat entre SUISA et YouTube est nouveau. Pour le moment, certains points de ce contrat doivent encore être éclaircis. Ces points concernent notamment le reporting. Jusqu’à la prochaine répartition (vraisemblablement en 2014), le procédé est en développement.

      Sous cette réserve, nous pouvons à ce stade donner les renseignements suivants:

      – Concernant votre première question: les listes d’oeuvres de YouTube contiennent le titre de l’oeuvre/de la chanson, de l’artiste, le titre de l’album et des indications optionnelles comme le label, les nos ISRC/ISWC, l’UPC-Code, pour autant que ces données soient connues. Les données proviennent du propre système Content-ID de youtube, principalement alimenté par les informations des labels.

      – Concernant votre deuxième question: le contrat vaut pour les accès à partir d’adresses IP suisses, ainsi que pour les accès à partir notamment du territoire de l’Union européenne, de l’AELE et de la CEE entre autres; les accès à partir des régions de l’Extrême-Orient et de l’Amrérique du Nord et du Sud ne sont pas couverts par le contrat. On peut ainsi dire que le contrat ne s’applique pas de manière générale pour YouTube. Dans le contrat, les utilisations sont réglées d’après le territoire de provenance des accès.

      Meilleures salutations
      Manu Leuenberger / Communication SUISA

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Cher Eric
      Merci pour vos deux questions, auxquelles nous allons répondre ces prochains jours.
      En vous remerciant de votre compréhension.
      Manu Leuenberger / Communication SUISA

  9. Bonjour,

    Pouvez-vous nous donner des précisions sur la manière dont les oeuvres seront déclarées par YouTube ? On sait que beaucoup d’internautes postent des vidéos avec du contenu musical mais sans forcément les déclarer. Ainsi YouTube ne devrait pas en avoir connaissance.

    Devrons-nous fournir des indications concernant des utilisations dont nous avons connaissance pour assurer le traitement par SUISA ?

    Mille mercis d’avance et cordiales salutations.

    Eric Mermod – myMusicRights Sàrl

    Extrait de votre article :
    Comme indiqué dans le communiqué de presse le contrat entre en vigueur au 1er septembre 2013. Il ne vaut donc que pour les «clics» effectués à partir de cette date. Désormais, YouTube fournira périodiquement à SUISA des statistiques sur l’utilisation des vidéos. Les statistiques d’utilisation indiquent quelles œuvres ont effectivement été utilisées et combien de fois elles l’ont été. Sur la base de ces indications, on calculera la part de redevances par œuvre.

  10. Liebes Suisa Team,

    erstmal Glückwunsch zum Vertrag – sicherlich eine tolle Sachen, dass jetzt auch endlich das größte Videoportal der Welt vergütet wird.

    Eine kleine Nachfrage habe ich dann aber doch: Wie geschieht denn das Titel-Reporting? Bzw. findet ein Einzeltitelreporting überhaupt statt?

    Best Grüße,
    Patrick

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Lieber Patrick

      Vielen Dank für deinen Kommentar und den Glückwunsch.

      Das oberste Gebot unserer Verteilung lautet: Jedes Mitglied soll erhalten, was ihm an Einnahmen zusteht. Diesen Grundsatz verfolgen wir mit höchster Priorität auch bei der Verteilung der Einnahmen aus Online-Nutzungen. Ob ein Einzeltitelreporting möglich ist, hängt unter anderem vom Detaillierungsgrad der Nutzungsstatistiken ab, die uns zur Verfügung gestellt werden. In Bezug auf den YouTube-Vertrag sind die diesbezüglichen Abklärungen zum Reporting derzeit am Laufen.

      Zu den Vergütungen von YouTube sind seit der Bekanntgabe des Vertragsabschlusses bei uns einige Fragen eingetroffen. Wir werden das Thema hier auf dem Blog oder in unserer Mitgliederzeitschrift SUISAinfo sicher noch einmal aufgreifen.

      Viele Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger / Projektleiter Kommunikation SUISA

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On 25 September 2013, SUISA and YouTube have announced the signature of a licensing agreement. Here are some Q&As regarding the SUISA/Youtube deal.

Questions and answers on the licensing agreement between SUISA and YouTube

SUISA/Youtube deal: Remuneration for the creative work of Swiss music authors on the biggest online video platform in the world. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

Why have SUISA and YouTube entered into a licensing agreement?
SUISA represents the copyright of many musical composers and lyricists from all over the world. On behalf of all of these composers and authors, SUISA is making sure that a remuneration is paid whenever their music is played, broadcast or performed in Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Playing, broadcasting and copying music is also referred to as music usage.

Most videos on YouTube can be viewed by any interested person at any time and from anywhere. In other words: YouTube makes...read more