Tag Archives: Membership

To be continued: Our success story, spanning more than 90 years

The General Assembly of our Cooperative Society will take place on Friday, 23 June 2017, in Zurich. Members will have the opportunity during the General Assembly to co-determine the destiny of their cooperative society. Apart from the positive results of the annual accounts for 2016, SUISA is also going to report on the Joint Venture Mint Digital Services, co-founded with SESAC, plus on the developments regarding the copyright revision and the debate on the ‘service public’. By Andreas Wegelin, CEO

To be continued: Our success story, spanning more than 90 years

SUISA founded the Joint Venture Mint Digital Services together with US authors’ society SESAC. The project helps improve the competitiveness of SUISA in the online music market. Shown in the picture: Andreas Wegelin, SUISA CEO (on the left), and John Josephson, Chairman and CEO of SESAC Holding. (Photo: Hannah McKay)

SUISA can look back on a successful financial year 2016. Thanks to the positive year-end result, we are able to pay out more than CHF 128m to those who are entitled to receive a payment. That is more than ever before in the successful history of the Cooperative Society SUISA, spanning more than 90 years.

We are also doing well in terms of our costs. An average cost coverage deduction of 12.37% shows that we have the costs under control. If you take the reoccurring supplementary distribution of 7% into consideration as a contribution to the costs, the actual percentage amounts to 6.75% of the pay-outs to those entitled to receive a payment.

SUISA improves its competitiveness in the online market

Members will have the opportunity during the General Assembly to co-determine the destiny of their cooperative society. Apart from the positive annual accounts, we are also going to present the newly founded project for the improvement of SUISA’s international competitiveness in the online music market.

Together with the US authors’ society SESAC, we have founded Mint Digital Services as a Joint Venture back in February 2017. The JV enterprise offers services in relation to the administration and processing of online music licences. With this JV, we emphasise our strategic direction, i.e. to offer rightsholders an efficient and cost-effective administration.

Wanted: Active participation of our cooperative members

There will also be news on the legal framework conditions. AGUR12 II has passed a compromise for the attention of the Head of the Ministry in the EJPD (Federal Department of Justice and Police, FDJP); we are now waiting for it to be substantiated in a legislative draft.

Please do take part in our General Assembly. Only your active participation ensures that SUISA will be there for its members as a Cooperative Society in future.

See you on 23 June 2017 in the Kaufleuten Zurich.

Related articles
Attend the SUISA General Assembly 2017 and take part in the decision-making processAttend the SUISA General Assembly 2017 and take part in the decision-making process SUISA’s ordinary General Assembly shall take place on Friday, 23 June 2017 in the Kaufleuten Festsaal in Zurich. How did financial year 2016 go? Who will be newly elected into the Distribution and Works Committee? What’s next for the “Service Public” at SRG? What are the aims of the recently created JV Mint Digital Services? Read more
Commentary on SUISA’s annual results for 2016Commentary on SUISA’s annual results for 2016 SUISA can report a very successful financial year 2016. The result reflects an all-time high regarding the income from domestic copyright exploitation. In the Cooperative Society’s history of more than 90 years, this is a record sum in terms of remuneration that is due for distribution. The average cost coverage deduction remains low – about CHF 88 per CHF 100 of the income collected can be paid out to authors and publishers that are entitled to receive such remuneration. Read more
SUISA member services: one look back, one look forwardSUISA member services: one look back, one look forward Quicker pay-outs due to quarterly settlements, simpler data processing via online works registrations, digital access to statements via “my account”, more efficiency via online forms … What’s next – settlements in “real time”? Will there be no more paper dispatched in future? Read more
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The General Assembly of our Cooperative Society will take place on Friday, 23 June 2017, in Zurich. Members will have the opportunity during the General Assembly to co-determine the destiny of their cooperative society. Apart from the positive results of the annual accounts for 2016, SUISA is also going to report on the Joint Venture Mint Digital Services, co-founded with SESAC, plus on the developments regarding the copyright revision and the debate on the ‘service public’. By Andreas Wegelin, CEO

To be continued: Our success story, spanning more than 90 years

SUISA founded the Joint Venture Mint Digital Services together with US authors’ society SESAC. The project helps improve the competitiveness of SUISA in the online music market. Shown in the picture: Andreas Wegelin, SUISA CEO (on the left), and John Josephson, Chairman and CEO of SESAC Holding. (Photo: Hannah McKay)

SUISA can look...read more

“As a songwriter, you’re some sort of a lone wolf”

Debrah Scarlett already enjoyed international fame before releasing her début EP “DYS(U)TOPIA” in mid-March. Prior to that, the Norwegian-Swiss musician joined SUISA. Text by guest author Markus Ganz

Debrah Scarlett: “As a songwriter, you’re some sort of a lone wolf”

New SUISA member: Joanna Deborah Bussinger who has adopted the pseudonym Debrah Scarlett. (Photo: Stian Foss)

“I prefer to play it safe and don’t place expectations in myself and others that are too high”, explains Joanna Deborah Bussinger when asked about her future plans. It was not least because of this kind of caution that the 23-year-old avoided the risk of turning into a fleeting pop starlet that has to waive the control over its career. In 2013, the daughter of a Norwegian mother and a Swiss-Italian father had taken part in the Norwegian version of the talent show “The Voice” – and reached the semi-final.

“I didn’t even want to win”, she adds with a smile, “otherwise I would have had to subject myself to tricky conditions.” Still, she doesn’t want to miss the experience she gained there any less than the experience of representing Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest in 2015, where she reached eighth place under her pseudonym Debrah Scarlett together with her duet partner Kjetil Mørland.

Trying out new things

“I do like to face fascinating opportunities and challenges”, Joanna Deborah Bussinger explains. “Even if I am scared at first, I nearly always learn something from the experience.” This also applies to her commute between Switzerland and Norway. She grew up in her native town of Basel and moved together with her mother and her two brothers to Norway when she was six years old. At the age of ten, she decided to try out “what it would be like to live with her father in Basel”. When she turned 21, she moved back – “rather intuitively” – to Norway. “That was a point in time where a lot of things were open and nothing stood in my way.”

Her family also played a major role regarding her professional career. “My parents have always told me: If you want to do something, then do it.” Another characterising effect for Joanna Deborah Bussinger was that she comes from a family which had been art and music enthusiasts for generations. Her mother is a painter and singer, her father plays the piano and writes poems. “When I was five years old, I didn’t yet know that I wanted to become a musician but that I had to express myself somehow, whether visually or musically. Music turned out to be the most natural medium and means for me to create my own world.”

Fuelled by feelings

When she was 15, Joanna Deborah Bussinger began to play the piano and to write songs. Soon she took singing lessons and attended the preparatory class at the Academy of Art and Design as well as the prep class of the Jazz Campus in Basel. She became more and more active and was a singer with the project ‘The Rumours’, for example. What she really wanted to do, however, was to develop her own music. The début EP “DYS(U)TOPIA” which was released mid-March does, despite its many stylistic influences sound remarkably independent and proficient, and it isn’t just the captivating singing but also the dreamy atmosphere that stands out.

Joanna Deborah Bussinger has written most of the songs at home so far, alone in front of the piano. “I have, more recently, also started to collaborate with other musicians. It is exciting to try something that you wouldn’t do alone at home, after all, as a songwriter, you’re usually some sort of a lone wolf.” Most of her songs are fuelled by a feeling, present around her, and for which she was trying to find a melody. “From this, a theme usually emerges and I soon realise while I am composing which direction the journey will take.”

Still going in 40 years’ time!

Music has become her “language”, as she spoke several languages since childhood and yet never managed any of them to perfection. “Music allowed me to express myself properly.” Nevertheless, she also writes song lyrics subtle and pensive at the same time, which reverberate even more once they are sung. They are always in English even though this is neither her mother’s nor her father’s tongue. “Strangely enough, it feels better for me to write personal lyrics in English. It provides the story with a certain distance, as if I had experienced it three years ago and would now only sing about it.”

Joanna Deborah Bussinger hopes that her career will continue to develop steadily; she is already working on a début album. “I try to do what I can and all members of my great team are doing the same, helping me in Basel, Berlin, London and Oslo. Still, I want to keep a nice, slow pace, not too fast, so that I don’t get under commercial pressure. After all, I still want to make music in 40 years.”

Comforting knowledge

With such long-term plans in mind, SUISA also plays a role, even though Joanna Deborah Bussinger has only recently joined as a member. “I had not really seen the sense in a membership of a collective management organisation for copyright before, as I had not published my compositions at that time.” This changed since she has been signed to the management and label ‘Radicalis’. As the company has its offices in Basel, she decided to become a SUISA member even though she is still living in Norway. “This way, the specialists at Radicalis can check any questions directly with SUISA which is also known for the fact that settlements are made quicker than at any other collective management organisation.” She doesn’t know yet what exactly she can expect from SUISA in terms of royalties. “But I think it’s great for all musicians that this kind of cooperative society exists. After all, it simplifies our lives with its work and defends our rights – to know that is really comforting.”

Concerts:
4th – 6th April at the “Zermatt Unplugged Festival”.

www.debrahscarlett.com, Debrah Scarlett’s official website

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“New York forced me to be original” Basel-based musician Manuel Gagneux has caused quite an international stir with his utterly unusual style mix of his project Zeal & Ardor. The composer and artist of dual Swiss-American nationality has recently joined SUISA. Last year, Zeal & Ardor seemed to appear out of nowhere with their mix of gospel, slave song, blues and black metal. The renowned US-American magazine Rolling Stone wrote the following under the title “Best Metal Records of 2016 So Far”: None of this year’s songs sounded “as strange, unfathomable and wonderful” as “Devil Is Fine” by Zeal and Ardor. Read more
Dual memberships: SUISA, and what else? SUISA manages the rights for its members globally. You should carefully review and consider the relevant effort and income if you wanted to become a member of several authors’ societies. If you live outside of Switzerland or the Principality of Liechtenstein, you can also become a SUISA member. Last but not least, it is also possible to be a member of another collective management organisation in addition to your SUISA membership. The following FAQs are intended to summarise what you need to consider when contemplating a so-called dual membership. Read more
Carrousel: “Sometimes a toy piano helps when you’re looking for a melody” | plus video – Chromatic, cheerful and charming – thats the sound of Carrousel’s chansons. Hard to imagine that they are created in the sparseness and solitude of the Jura landscape rather than in the backstreets of Paris. “At the beginning of our cooperation, we tried working from Paris”, Sophie Burande laughs with her crystal-clear and yet warm voice. “Thanks to a stipend of the Canton Jura it was possible for us to work and live in Paris for half a year.” She and her life partner Léonard Gogniat found the energetic lifestyle, just as the rich cultural offering, rather stimulating. “But in the end, we preferred to come back to Switzerland.” Read more
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Debrah Scarlett already enjoyed international fame before releasing her début EP “DYS(U)TOPIA” in mid-March. Prior to that, the Norwegian-Swiss musician joined SUISA. Text by guest author Markus Ganz

Debrah Scarlett: “As a songwriter, you’re some sort of a lone wolf”

New SUISA member: Joanna Deborah Bussinger who has adopted the pseudonym Debrah Scarlett. (Photo: Stian Foss)

“I prefer to play it safe and don’t place expectations in myself and others that are too high”, explains Joanna Deborah Bussinger when asked about her future plans. It was not least because of this kind of caution that the 23-year-old avoided the risk of turning into a fleeting pop starlet that has to waive the control over its career. In 2013, the daughter of a Norwegian mother and a Swiss-Italian father had taken part in the Norwegian version of the talent show “The Voice” – and reached the...read more

SUISA member services: one look back, one look forward

Quicker pay-outs due to quarterly settlements, simpler data processing via online works registrations, digital access to statements via “my account”, more efficiency via online forms … What’s next – settlements in “real time”? Will there be no more paper dispatched in future? By Irène Philipp Ziebold, Director

SUISA member services: one look back, one look forward

You want to register your work with SUISA while you’re in your rehearsal cellar via your tablet, or check your statements electronically? No problem – thanks to the web portal “my account”. (Photo: Archimede / Shutterstock.com)

In the last few years, SUISA has already implemented important measures which yielded more efficiency and higher quality for member services. The layout of the statements has also been reviewed. Since their redesign, they contain even more detailed information than ever before. Distributions thus became more transparent. In autumn 2015, SUISA introduced quarterly settlements. Since then, members receive the remuneration due to them at least four times a year.

Since 2015, members can electronically access their settlements via the web portal “my account”. An update was carried out at the beginning of March 2017 regarding the online service range offered by SUISA which members can use via “my account”: the works registration has been simplified, members can search specifically for roles in relation to their own works (e.g. Arranger), sub-publishing agreements can now be registered online and the web portal layout has been optimised for the broad range of end devices.

A works registration at SUISA via a tablet while you’re on the road, while you’re rehearsing in your cellar at home or during a meeting with your co-authors somewhere abroad? Thanks for “my account” all of this is possible.

From paper to electronic mail-outs

Paper forms (hardcopies) will be replaced by soft copies. Electronic data processing makes efficient processing possible. SUISA constantly checks what is possible from a technical point of view and what actually makes sense with regards to the range of member services offered. In this context, it is also important to consider members’ interests and wishes.

Do SUISA members want to receive all settlements and the relevant settlement details on paper? Or is the majority of members of the opinion that there should only be electronic statements now?

It is obvious that costs can be saved by not printing settlement statements out any longer to be mailed out by post. What speaks against renouncing on a paper dispatch is the fact that up to now only half of the active membership holds a log in for “my account”. Moreover, it is known that some members continue to regard hardcopy statements as a necessity going forward.

Taking all of these aspects into consideration, the range of member services is currently discussed; especially the pros and cons of the various offers have to be weighed up. Decisions will be made in the course of 2017.

Settlements in “real time”?

Every now and then we are asked by members whether we are planning to run distributions in “real time”. This would mean that, as soon copyright remuneration e.g. for a concert has been collected, it would be immediately paid out to the entitled parties . There are no longer settlement dates for all members but each member would receive their money separately as soon as it becomes available.

The technological requirements could – with some rather significant effort – be developed for such a process. The entire process from collection to pay-out would have to be analysed from scratch. Particularly our distribution rules would have to undergo a major overhaul since many provisions are not compatible with a real-time distribution.

As a consequence, the question remains whether such a system and process migration really corresponds with the needs of the majority of our members and whether quarterly pay-outs might not already satisfy the need for efficiency?

More service, more advice

We continue to monitor and test the service range offered to our members. The rule of thumb is: as much service as possible! Numerous automation processes such as data processing could – as already mentioned – be introduced by means of new IT applications. These enable a more efficient processing and offer the chance to use the resources thus freed up in another way.

The time that has thus been gained will be used for a competent and personal advisory service to our members. Apart from all the measures to increase efficiency, the personal contact to our members continues to be a core concern of SUISA. We will not lose sight of the quality assurance of SUISA member services.

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Right in the middle of it and in full swing to improve the service range offered to members A glance on the service range offered by SUISA for its members shows: During the last few years, there have been innovations which brought about more efficiency and quality. Among these are more detailed settlement statements, the web portal “my account” and the digitisation of member files. These improvements signify a continu-ous process with SUISA right in the middle of it – and in full swing at it, as the follow-ing outlook shows: New: quarterly distributions. “My account” is undergoing further development. We are modernising the technology of our works database. Our member services are also subjected to a fundamental review. Read more
New online forms for SUISA customers – Since the beginning of 2016, SUISA has made new online forms available to its customers.  The aim of the new service range offered is to simplify the notification process for music users. SUISA also benefits from this online procedure due to the efficiency of the data processing options. Read more
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All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

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Quicker pay-outs due to quarterly settlements, simpler data processing via online works registrations, digital access to statements via “my account”, more efficiency via online forms … What’s next – settlements in “real time”? Will there be no more paper dispatched in future? By Irène Philipp Ziebold, Director

SUISA member services: one look back, one look forward

You want to register your work with SUISA while you’re in your rehearsal cellar via your tablet, or check your statements electronically? No problem – thanks to the web portal “my account”. (Photo: Archimede / Shutterstock.com)

In the last few years, SUISA has already implemented important measures which yielded more efficiency and higher quality for member services. The layout of the statements has also been reviewed. Since their redesign, they contain even more detailed information than ever before. Distributions thus became more transparent. In autumn 2015, SUISA...read more

“New York forced me to be original”

Basel-based musician Manuel Gagneux has caused quite an international stir with his utterly unusual style mix of his project Zeal & Ardor. The composer and artist of dual Swiss-American nationality has recently joined SUISA. Guest contribution by Markus Ganz

Manuel Gagneux: “New York forced me to be original”

New at SUISA: Basel-based Manuel Gagneux of Zeal & Ardor. (Photo: Matthias Willi)

Last year, Zeal & Ardor seemed to appear out of nowhere with their mix of gospel, slave song, blues and black metal. The renowned US-American magazine Rolling Stone wrote the following under the title “Best Metal Records of 2016 So Far”: None of this year’s songs sounded “as strange, unfathomable and wonderful” as “Devil Is Fine” by Zeal and Ardor. Said album will now be officially released globally, and international live performances will follow.

Broadly influenced style

It is not out of nowhere that this solo project by Manuel Gagneux has appeared, after all. He grew up in a musical home in Basel, where there was a piano that always invited to tinkle the ivories. Such are the memories that the 28-year-old shares during an interview in his cool and gloomy basement practice room in Kleinbasel. His mother is an Afro-American singer, his Swiss father has been playing percussion with the salsa formation Picason and in the funk band Grand Mother’s Funck for many years.

They sent their son to take saxophone lessons but Manuel Gagneux couldn’t get on with this instrument at all. At the age of 15, he began to play the guitar because he loved Rock and Metal – well, he still does. Soon, he fell in love with Black Metal because “it was the most extreme music around back then”, he admits with a laugh. “Of course I know now that a lot of things surrounding Black Metal are questionable”.

Looking for a challenge

Manuel Gagneux has already proved with three astoundingly versatile and pop-like albums of his solo project Birdmask that he does not want to be nailed down when it comes to his style. These albums were mainly created in New York where he had moved to in 2012, since he found that the Basel music scene was not challenging enough. “If you do something in New York, you can be sure that there’s someone that does it better. That requires a certain kind of humility but also forced me to be original, something I actually appreciated.”

Looking for a new creative approach, he followed unusual paths. On the internet forum 4chan, he posted the question which two music styles would be incompatible, intending to use it as a kind of exercise to combine them into a song in half an hour. Someone replied “Black Metal and nigger music”. While Manuel Gagneux didn’t find that too funny, what with his Afro-American mother, but he found it musically stimulating.

Combine the incompatible

The singer and multi-instrumentalist thus went on a search for original material of Black Music. He had particular success in the online archive of the US-American ethnologist Alan Lomax. He took his inspiration from songs sung by slaves in the fields, for example, and repeated them by singing parts of them in a modified manner, then combined them with Metal riffs and even added electronic sounds to three of the songs.

Following a trial & error method, he was able to combine these different elements, Manuel Gagneux adds. “The first songs turned out to be awful”, he recalls and rolls his eyes. “But at some point I realised that it would be best if I opened the pieces with Spiritual Music, as it has a welcoming effect: You want to bop along, join in. Metal Music, on the other hand, is like a slap in the face, and you can give the music an enormous push with that.”

From a solo project to a band

Manuel Gagneux played all instruments himself, apart from the drums which he programmed, as he does not regard himself “as a gifted drummer”. He also recorded everything with his laptop and “a simple microphone” and engineered it. “I only used bad equipment, but that was also an advantage”, he grins.

What he probably means: The recordings really don’t sound perfect but it amplifies their authenticity. In order to be able to give a captivating performance during his coming tour, he has assembled a band with five musicians – and he’s already writing new material for it – his album is, after all, only 25 minutes long.

“There’s no two ways about it”

Before his career kicks off properly, Manuel Gagneux registered with SUISA. His parents had already told him early on that he ought to become a member. “I used to laugh it off. And my opinion of SUISA was ambivalent because some of the bands had told me that they would not be booked by clubs because they had to pay SUISA fees.”

His manager, David Burger of Reelmusic, had, however, warmly recommended that he become a member, because there’s simply no two ways about it. He has no expectations as of yet what benefits this could bring him for definite. “I am a new member and have therefore got no clue what I can expect.”

Tour dates in Switzerland and adjacent regions:
14 April 2017 Czar Fest Basel, 3 May 2017 Magnolia Milano, 4 May 2017 Usine Geneva; he has also planned some summer festival performances.

www.zealandardor.com, official website of Zeal & Ardor

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Basel-based musician Manuel Gagneux has caused quite an international stir with his utterly unusual style mix of his project Zeal & Ardor. The composer and artist of dual Swiss-American nationality has recently joined SUISA. Guest contribution by Markus Ganz

Manuel Gagneux: “New York forced me to be original”

New at SUISA: Basel-based Manuel Gagneux of Zeal & Ardor. (Photo: Matthias Willi)

Last year, Zeal & Ardor seemed to appear out of nowhere with their mix of gospel, slave song, blues and black metal. The renowned US-American magazine Rolling Stone wrote the following under the title “Best Metal Records of 2016 So Far”: None of this year’s songs sounded “as strange, unfathomable and wonderful” as “Devil Is Fine” by Zeal and Ardor. Said album will now be officially released globally, and international live performances will follow.

Broadly influenced style

It is not out of nowhere that...read more

“Nothing, nothing at all beats a well-written song”

The international success with Bonaparte is the current highlight of the long-term songwriter career of Tobias Jundt. He penned several hundred titles, spanning a wide stylistic variety, even for or together with other artists. Born in Berne, and now living in Berlin, the composer passes on his knowledge and experience as a guest lecturer at the Zürcher Hochschule der Künste (Zurich University of the Arts) in the subject “songwriting”. An interview with the SUISA member who has been nominated for the Grand Prix Musik in 2016 and performs with his new formation, Mule & Man, at the Festival Label Suisse in Lausanne.

“Nothing, nothing at all beats a well-written song”

With his new project, Mule & Man, Tobias Jundt (lying down) can be enjoyed together with Kid Simius (standing up) during their live concert at Les Docks during the Festival Label Suisse on Saturday, 17 September 2016. (Photo: Melissa Jundt)

What does the nomination for the music award of the Federal Office of Culture (BAK)?
Tobias Jundt: I am, of course, honoured that my art is recognised and appreciated as such. Especially when you create something that is usually neither here nor there and thus cannot be squeezed into a pigeon-hole, it takes quite some time until you will be recognised as an artist with your own language. With such a huge variety on offer, it is basically impossible to compare or rate the creations of some with the works of others. But after 30 years as a songwriter, I am rather flattered that I am given the opportunity to be a representative of the cultural language of my country as one of the possible musical parts.

The BAK presents the music award 2016 in the run-up to the Festival Label Suisse. The Festival in Lausanne attracts mainly Swiss music from various genres to the stages over a three-day period. Access to the concerts is free. Why does Swiss music need a music award from the BAK and a Festival like the Label Suisse?
I think we should consider ourselves grateful to live in a country where the government takes time to honour the arts and luckily has the necessary change in the pocket to temporarily and considerably simplify the creativity of the prize winners with this award. All of the nominees would continue to relentlessly do what they do anyway, in order to face the high seas of life, even without the award. We should thankfully accept the fact that the BAK supports us with this and provides a silver-lined breeze for our sails.
Festivals are places where you can discover things. The audience discovers music bands, artists meet other artists, collaborations are forged and, somewhere, a Schwyzeroergeli fan falls in love with a Stockhausen follower. Festivals, do, however, never replace an artist’s concert experience a whole evening provides, but they are very important as events where expression can be exchanged and even collide. It is always the right choice to campaign for a broad and liberal-minded culture.

“You need stamina, a tireless will to attack and a stoic persistence when it comes to realise your artistic drive.”

You once said in an NZZ interview that it was only possible to survive in Switzerland with mainstream pop music or in one of the heavily subsidised genres such as jazz or classical music. What has to change so that the diversity of Swiss music creations will attract more listeners, both at home and abroad?
It’s a problem that a musical niche related only to Switzerland is indeed rather small, so that it cannot really be exercised as a main profession but only ‘on the side’. You therefore either have to be active in a genre where you can generate a lot of turnover, or in a subsidised sector, or tackle a bigger territory. The latter requires a lot of stamina, a tireless will to attack and a stoic persistence when it comes to realise your artistic drive. Unless the motivation for this artistic insanity comes from deep within yourself, there is no real driver for the majority of Swiss people to risk their existing quality of life. You do actually have to be a little bit crazy to want to renounce on it at least temporarily in order to plough this rather tough musical field. During my travels, I repeatedly meet very active Swiss expats. It isn’t the talent that is lacking, it is the attitude.

You have been living in Berlin since 2006 and are now settled in there. How can you ‘be’ as a Swiss songwriter abroad and how is Swiss music, in your opinion, perceived abroad?
Most people of this solar system fall in love with Switzerland and what it represents. You often forget about that when you sit on the mountain too long. If I write music for other artists in Berlin or New York, nobody ever asks me where I grew up. The aim is always the same: to write the right work for a specific phase of an artist. That involves either aspects of commercial success or artistic reinvention. And when I perform my songs as a soloist appearing as Bonaparte from Beijing to Wellington, nobody asks me where I am from either – even though I do quite like to add that I am Swiss – especially as it distinguishes me from those out there and because it is an important part of my being. In order to prevail, you need to have an alert mind and soak in and apply the various parameters of the different cultures. Everyone can do that, irrespective of where they’re from.

“I claim that Switzerland has one of the best collective management organisations in the world. SUISA is where I belong as a composer.”

You live in Germany, but you are a member of the Swiss SUISA. Why?
I claim that Switzerland has one of the best collective management organisations in the world – and that’s an opinion shared by quite a few international authors. I say this with a clear conscience and out of my own free will. I was a member of BMI in the USA in the past, and I also run a publishing company which is a member of GEMA. All well and good but SUISA is the place where I belong as a composer. I really enjoyed the time under Poto Wegener and, due to his support, I began looking into copyright more intensively. The good relations to SUISA have stayed in place and I really appreciate the mutual exchange and respect.

You lecture the subject “songwriting” at the Zurich University of the Arts. Can you learn how to write a hit? Which tips do you give students for composing on their way?
I usually advise them to forget everything they think they know. I like to ask them to write songs as humans and not as musicians. Of course, analytical and theoretical knowledge and practical techniques help us to find a quicker way out of musical cul-de-sacs. But at the core of finding ideas, there isn’t much difference between us and Mrs Mountainvalley who whistles a little melody while having a shower in the morning. You can, of course, just like in every situation in life, learn a technique – whether it’s holding a club as a golfer or using Kamasutra positions as a lover – which allows you to write good songs at any old day of the week. But there are many and enough good songs already – you need to rather try to write songs with a certain je-ne-sais-quoi: songs which still have a raison d’etre even to be let loose onto mankind in their genre, even after the life work of a, Lennon-McCartney an Udo Jürgens, an Igor Strawinsky or Daft Punk. This doesn’t always work, but that’s what the songwriter has to get up for each morning – for the attempt to write a song which, in its own way, enriches the world.

“The most important thing that still exists, especially today, is the musical idea.”

A musician on a concert stage is not necessarily at the same time the songwriter, who is often forgotten in comparison with the star in the limelight. How can composers step out of the artists’ shadow when it comes to public perception?
The question is, do they have to. I only sing the songs that I cannot expect others to perform. The psychological pressure that a front man and artists have to sustain, can – in the long run – be rather exhausting. A songwriter, however, can act in the background, sit in front of their piano somewhere, unnoticed, and simply focus on the core of the music. And believe me, the most important thing that still exists, especially today, is the musical idea. Nothing, and nothing at all beats a really well-written song which cleverly combines craft and original ideas. There may be hope for all who thought that there had been too much speak of the devil. I am rather glad that I have a dozen pseudonyms at SUISA – these are songwriter roles into which I can morph depending on the style, genre or mood and that aren’t even known to my closest friends. I like it that professional songwriting sometimes simply remains a secret between the piece of paper and myself. If a musician does something odd on stage, everybody will talk about it the next day. If a composer creates a little string quartet, naked, while eating two spoons of peanut butter, nobody cares two hoots about it. I really like that. It’s important that we as composers exchange our views and that our rights are well represented through the change of the times.

Composing music for third parties or performing with Mule & Man on stage – what’s the thrill for you of these two activities?
I did have some elitist phases in my life, where I only considered this kind of free jazz or that type of soul to be worth listening to. But at the end of the day, I am suffering from musically inflicted polyamory, and love all kinds of music with a passion, but also have to co-invent. I get satisfaction from composing string or wind arrangements, protest songs, punk chansons, film score, electronic music, experimental fiddling about with noise or country music for the deaf. I like it that you can take from this bottomless cornucopia of combinations and possibilities between the composer and the listener.

Links
Bonaparte, official website
Mule & Man, official Facebook fan page
Label Suisse, website of the Festival
Schweizer Musikpreis (Swiss music award), website of the Swiss Federal Office for Culture (BAK)

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The international success with Bonaparte is the current highlight of the long-term songwriter career of Tobias Jundt. He penned several hundred titles, spanning a wide stylistic variety, even for or together with other artists. Born in Berne, and now living in Berlin, the composer passes on his knowledge and experience as a guest lecturer at the Zürcher Hochschule der Künste (Zurich University of the Arts) in the subject “songwriting”. An interview with the SUISA member who has been nominated for the Grand Prix Musik in 2016 and performs with his new formation, Mule & Man, at the Festival Label Suisse in Lausanne.

“Nothing, nothing at all beats a well-written song”

With his new project, Mule & Man, Tobias Jundt (lying down) can be enjoyed together with Kid Simius (standing up) during their live concert at Les Docks during the Festival...read more

“Your soul is reflected in the Blues”

Yannick Nanette joined SUISA in 2015. The singer, guitarist and harmonica player from Mauritius lives in Lausanne and constitutes the Blues band The Two together with Thierry Jaccard. They already had performances at the Montreux Jazz Festival and Zermatt Unplugged. In the US, the duo made it to the semi-finals of the International Blues Challenge in Memphis. Text by Michael Welti

“Your soul is reflected in the Blues”

New SUISA member: Yannick Nanette, based in Lausanne. (Photo: Y. Nanette)

“My dad played the guitar and sang – and as they say ‘like father, like son’”, writes Yannick Nanette. He is half of The Two; a band which has dedicated itself to the Blues. “In the Blues in its entire depth and released truth, your soul is reflected”, he continues. He finds himself in the music and where it takes him.

Yannick Nanette grew up on the island state of Mauritius. “My uncle often listened to Louis Armstrong, Fats Domino and Big Bill Broonzy. I did not understand a lot of what was said, I was still small. But I loved the rhythm, the movement, the expressiveness”, the artist remembers. “Apart from these links to the USA, I found a similar timbre within traditional Mauritian music, the Sega, with the voice of ‘Ti-Frère’ or – newer – with Eric Triton: the same wild strength, a happy seriousness and the desire to be independent. That is absolutely understandable, after all, the Sega dates back to the times of slavery.”

“Blues is still very much present today”, Yannick Nanette writes. “You just have to switch on the TV and watch images of people which eat each other in the name of comfort and individualism. Slavery of the 1800s is over. The ‘strange fruits’ which Billie Holiday sang about do no longer hang on the trees, but above us hovers man’s monstrosity in its entire spectrum. Modern slavery is colour blind. It’s not about black or white; cotton today is money, and mankind bends over backwards to serve it.”

Sweet Dirty Blues

At the age of 13, Yannick Nanette began to play the guitar and to sing. Four years later, he discovered the harmonica on a bus ride heading for Port-Louis. A regular passenger behind him was a harmonica player called Ignace. “During the one-hour trip the sounds on the back seat were whirling and swinging. That was incredible!” Yannick was fascinated and asked the musician whether he would teach him how to play the harmonica. The man said yes.

Today, the 33-year old lives in Lausanne. The band The Two which he founded together with his friend Thierry Jaccard, published its first album in 2014, called “Sweet Dirty Blues”. In the meantime, the two have played at over 130 concerts, among those festivals in Croatia, Denmark, Italy and France.

SUISA membership

At the moment, Yannick Nanette only finances a part of his cost of living with the music. “I am a student at the moment and work on the side as a teacher. The two ‘supporting legs’ generate just about enough money so that I can support myself and pay my insurances etc. From a philosophical standpoint, I earn my life and live thanks to music”, Nanette adds.

The SUISA membership gives Yannick Nanette a big advantage: “I can delegate the rights management, knowing that a competent and experienced organisation such as SUISA is looking after that. That makes things easier and relieves some time pressure. The time thus saved can be re-invested into creating my music. I am content and hope that SUISA will continue to do such good work. I also expect transparency from SUISA, after all, mutual trust is important for continuity.”

www.the-two.ch, official website

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Yannick Nanette joined SUISA in 2015. The singer, guitarist and harmonica player from Mauritius lives in Lausanne and constitutes the Blues band The Two together with Thierry Jaccard. They already had performances at the Montreux Jazz Festival and Zermatt Unplugged. In the US, the duo made it to the semi-finals of the International Blues Challenge in Memphis. Text by Michael Welti

“Your soul is reflected in the Blues”

New SUISA member: Yannick Nanette, based in Lausanne. (Photo: Y. Nanette)

“My dad played the guitar and sang – and as they say ‘like father, like son’”, writes Yannick Nanette. He is half of The Two; a band which has dedicated itself to the Blues. “In the Blues in its entire depth and released truth, your soul is reflected”, he continues. He finds himself in the music and where it takes him.

Yannick...read more

Right in the middle of it and in full swing to improve the service range offered to members

A glance on the service range offered by SUISA for its members shows: During the last few years, there have been innovations which brought about more efficiency and quality. Among these are more detailed settlement statements, the web portal “my account” and the digitisation of member files. These improvements signify a continu-ous process with SUISA right in the middle of it – and in full swing at it, as the follow-ing outlook shows: New: quarterly distributions. “My account” is undergoing further development. We are modernising the technology of our works database. Our member services are also subjected to a fundamental review. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold, Director

Irène Philipp Ziebold has been managing the “Member Services and Distribution” Division since July 2010 as its Director. (Photo: Juerg Isler, isler-fotografie.ch)

Since 2016, SUISA has been paying out the majority of its income on a quarterly basis. With the new quarterly distributions in March, June, September and December, SUISA has been paying out copyright royalties to its members more quickly. The transparency within the set-tlement statements has also been increased. Thanks to the combination of various distribution categories, it has also been possible to reduce costs.

Online services for members

Our strategy relating to the online service range offered to our members is based on three pillars: Firstly, our websites form the foundation (www.suisa.ch and www.suisablog.ch). We publish a variety of information on these sites. Secondly, we have been developing online forms for a more efficient notification and registration process. Thirdly, we offer our members electronic access to their data and distributions via “my account”.

The web portal “my account” is going to be developed further over the next few years. The plan is to provide members with the option to update their membership details themselves, raise online usage queries, generate statements of account at any time and to offer additional distribution functionalities in future.

In the course of the new IT strategy, the SUISA works database is also going to be migrated to a modern technology. That way, we will obtain a better performance, but avoid various media gaps and thus reach a complete integration into the IT target architecture. All of this is going to significantly improve efficiency.

Member services under scrutiny

Last but not least, we are going to review our member services. As for any of our efforts to improve our service range, it is always a balancing act between quantity and quality. With membership numbers nearly doubling over the last 10 years, and five times as many work registrations during the same period, without collections having increased at the same rate – that’s a challenge for SUISA regarding its member services which we have to meet afresh every day.

Quality must be right and the costs need to be under control! For 2016, we have launched a project with the aim to create a service range catalogue showing the conditions applying to our service range for our members in future.

Right in the middle of it and in full swing: We have already left certain milestones behind, and we’re ready to tackle the next ones. Many thanks for placing your trust in us!

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A glance on the service range offered by SUISA for its members shows: During the last few years, there have been innovations which brought about more efficiency and quality. Among these are more detailed settlement statements, the web portal “my account” and the digitisation of member files. These improvements signify a continu-ous process with SUISA right in the middle of it – and in full swing at it, as the follow-ing outlook shows: New: quarterly distributions. “My account” is undergoing further development. We are modernising the technology of our works database. Our member services are also subjected to a fundamental review. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold, Director

Irène Philipp Ziebold has been managing the “Member Services and Distribution” Division since July 2010 as its Director. (Photo: Juerg Isler, isler-fotografie.ch)

Since 2016, SUISA has...read more

Dual memberships: SUISA, and what else?

SUISA manages the rights for its members globally. You should carefully review and consider the relevant effort and income if you wanted to become a member of several authors’ societies. Text by Claudia Kempf and Manu Leuenberger

Dual memberships: SUISA, and what else?

It is not a problem for rights management to deal with members of several collecting societies who are playing the same band. One example is the Swiss-German pop duo Boy, shown during a live performance at the SiriusXM studios in New York City on 03 April 2013. Valeska Steiner (r.) is a SUISA member, Sonja Glass (l.) is registered with a sister society abroad. (Photo: Rob Kim / Getty Images)

SUISA has entered into reciprocal agreements with over 100 sister societies globally. These agreements provide SUISA members with a big advantage: They can exercise their musical activities outside of Switzerland – the payment of the relevant copyright remuneration is made in the usual manner by its trusted society, SUISA.

If you live outside of Switzerland or the Principality of Liechtenstein, you can also become a SUISA member. Last but not least, it is also possible to be a member of another collective management organisation in addition to your SUISA membership. The following FAQs are intended to summarise what you need to consider when contemplating a so-called dual membership:

What should I consider before applying for dual membership?
If you become a member of a sister society abroad – on top of your SUISA membership – you have to expect an additional administrative effort. In the case of dual memberships, you need to deal with the regulations and formalities of several societies.
You also need to consider the extra cost: Some societies charge admission fees, respectively annual membership fees. Furthermore, some sister societies’ services may be fee-based, whereas at SUISA, they are covered by the general administration cost deduction from distributions. We recommend that you thoroughly analyse any one-off and regularly recurring costs of memberships with other societies.
Furthermore, you should consider any potential effects on the pension payments from SUISA: In the case of dual memberships, you receive your remuneration directly from other societies. This reduces the level of the remuneration distributed via SUISA, which, in turn, may have an influence on the calculation of the relevant income for your pension entitlement which you have as a SUISA member from your 63rd birthday onwards. Find more information on SUISA’s pension scheme here.

What is the use of a dual membership anyway?
In the case of a dual membership, remuneration for usages from a specific territory are not distributed via SUISA but via the respective society based abroad. An author whose works are performed or broadcast a lot in Argentina could become a direct member of the Argentinian society (Sadaic). Due to the dual membership with Sadaic, the respective royalties would be paid out more quickly after the performance, resp. broadcast, since Sadaic does transfer the payment directly to the author rather than to SUISA in the first place. SUISA has, however, recently created a new distribution schedule for payments from abroad and harmonised the settlement dates better with the dates of the sister societies so that the remuneration can be paid out more quickly.
In the case of a dual membership, members must clarify any queries relating to settlements, pay-outs and formalities directly with the society abroad. The only difference in the level of remuneration is that SUISA takes off a cost deduction of 4% when distributing royalties from abroad. In the case of rights being managed abroad, the tariffs and distribution rules prevalent in the respective territory are applicable. The cost deduction of 4% thus does not apply in the case of a direct membership with a second society, but only for its own “home territory”, in the case study of Sadaic, this would mean for Argentina (only). The society based abroad would, however, take off a cost deduction for all other territories, just like SUISA would.
It is therefore recommended to review and consider the effort and income carefully. This applies especially against a background of territorial limitations dissolving in the online sector, and SUISA being able to manage the online rights for its members across all of Europe (and other countries) directly, i.e. without any intermediate steps via a sister society. Please also refer to the next FAQ.

Does it make sense to assign online rights to several societies?
Since August 2013, SUISA has been licensing online rights at a pan-European level. This means: SUISA collects its members’ remuneration from iTunes, for example, for all of Europe. For SUISA members, this means that they receive their income from the online sector directly (without any intermediate step via sister societies) and thus more quickly. A dual membership for online rights makes no sense in this case.

Do I have to change society if I move to another country?
If you have not excluded any territories from your Administration Agreement with SUISA, then SUISA manages the rights of its members globally, irrespective of its members’ residence. You can therefore be a SUISA member irrespective of where you are a resident or where you are relocating to.

What do I have to consider when I change societies?
We recommend that you check the membership admission conditions of the new society up front. All details and documents for a SUISA membership can be accessed on the SUISA website, both for authors and publishers. Only when you are sure that your admission with the new society has been successful, should you terminate your relationship with your former society. You should follow the same procedure if you wish to become a member of an additional society just for a specific territory.
Another item to consider: periods of notice. At SUISA, it is possible to give 6 months’ notice for individual territories per the end of a year (31st December). Furthermore, it is important to know that certain societies abroad manage performing and broadcasting rights only, or mechanical rights only. Before you withdraw rights from a society, you should check whether the new society really manages all rights – as is the case with SUISA.

What happens in terms of double taxation in the case of dual memberships?
You should also establish tax-related matters in the case of dual memberships. Detailed information on the topic of double taxation would go way beyond the scope of this article. It might be useful to consult a tax advisor in this context. SUISA has collated some information on the fact sheet “Notes on double taxation” which can be accessed at www.suisa.ch/urheberdokumente.

What happens to my IPI number when I change society?
The IPI number is an international identification number of an author or a publisher. The number is unique and remains unchanged, irrespective of the society you are a member of. Further information on the IPI number can be found on our website in the section law & guidance, or in our members’ magazine SUISAinfo, edition 2.12 (in German, PDF, 3.2 MB).

Does it make sense to become a SUISA member if my works are exclusively used in a territory abroad?
If the entire repertoire of an author is exclusively used in one single country outside of Switzerland and Liechtenstein, it might make sense to apply for membership with the relevant society in that country. It does, however, always depend on your individual situation. It pays back to get good advice, not just in this case: Our members of staff of the SUISA members’ department are happy to help with any queries relating to (dual) membership and changing society:

Author(s)
d/e: authors(at)suisa(dot)ch, 044 485 68 28
f: authorsF(at)suisa(dot)ch, 021 614 32 32
i: autori(at)suisa(dot)ch, 091 950 08 28

Publishers
All languages: publishers(at)suisa(dot)ch, 044 485 68 20

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SUISA manages the rights for its members globally. You should carefully review and consider the relevant effort and income if you wanted to become a member of several authors’ societies. Text by Claudia Kempf and Manu Leuenberger

Dual memberships: SUISA, and what else?

It is not a problem for rights management to deal with members of several collecting societies who are playing the same band. One example is the Swiss-German pop duo Boy, shown during a live performance at the SiriusXM studios in New York City on 03 April 2013. Valeska Steiner (r.) is a SUISA member, Sonja Glass (l.) is registered with a sister society abroad. (Photo: Rob Kim / Getty Images)

SUISA has entered into reciprocal agreements with over 100 sister societies globally. These agreements provide SUISA members with a big advantage: They can exercise their musical...read more

New online services in “my account” for SUISA members

Since June 2015, SUISA members have access to new services via their personal online user accounts: “my account” now offers distribution statements in pdf format, access to personal data and an improved work search facility. Text by Claudia Kempf

New online services in “my account” for SUISA members

The member portal “my account” has been made mobile-friendly and future-proof. Our personal online user account gradually offers SUISA members new functions. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

SUISA is gradually extending its online services for its members. The password-protected members’ area “my account” has been entirely re-developed. The redesigned platform enables functionalities in future that require a smooth exchange with the back office and other IT systems at SUISA.

Distribution statements as pdfs and access to personal data

The first version of the re-programmed online portal offers SUISA members extended options in some areas:

Members can now access all their distributions from the last five years. These distributions shall be made available in pdf for downloading.

Personal data such as postal addresses and payment addresses can be displayed. Any pseudonyms registered and the relevant IPI numbers are listed in the “profile” area.

All details were summarised for publishing members with sub-editions or several main publishers. The merged data are clearly arranged and easily accessible via one login.

Optimised functions

In addition to the above improvements, further functions of the previous version have been revised and optimised. The search in the works database contains additional functionalities. It is now possible to specifically search for provisional/temporary works registrations. A work is deemed to have been registered provisionally if SUISA has found out about it due to a usage report, but if the work has not yet, only partially, or under a completely different title been registered with SUISA by the author or publisher.

Furthermore, sub-publishers are now also shown in the works database. Finally, the online works registration has been adapted and expanded by additional entry fields.

Mobile-friendly and future-proof

Of course, our “my account” platform is compatible with mobile devices such as tablets or smartphones. We are planning to continually extend the services in the online user account by further functionalities and additional services over the next 4 years. We shall keep you informed on any related news via SUISAblog.ch, suisa.ch or in our SUISAinfo magazine.

Access to “my account” is open to every SUISA member. You can order your login for your personal online user account under:

d: www.suisa.ch/mein-konto
f: www.suisa.ch/mon-compte
i: www.suisa.ch/il-mio-conto
e: www.suisa.ch/my-account

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All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

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Since June 2015, SUISA members have access to new services via their personal online user accounts: “my account” now offers distribution statements in pdf format, access to personal data and an improved work search facility. Text by Claudia Kempf

New online services in “my account” for SUISA members

The member portal “my account” has been made mobile-friendly and future-proof. Our personal online user account gradually offers SUISA members new functions. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

SUISA is gradually extending its online services for its members. The password-protected members’ area “my account” has been entirely re-developed. The redesigned platform enables functionalities in future that require a smooth exchange with the back office and other IT systems at SUISA.

Distribution statements as pdfs and access to personal data

The first version of the re-programmed online portal offers SUISA members extended options in some areas:

Members can now access all...read more

A worldwide network for the rights of SUISA members

Music doesn’t know any boundaries. Not just literally but also geographically: Once you have managed to make it abroad, a well-functioning network of local support can be of great use. This applies particularly for the administrative work and therefore also for types of copyright which cannot be paid out in cash there and then. SUISA has a global network and is engaged in activities, in cooperation with its foreign sister societies, to manage the rights of SUISA members as comprehensively as possible. Text by Irène Philipp, Director

A worldwide network for the rights of SUISA members

Bastian Baker, singer-songwriter from Lausanne, who has been a member of SUISA since 2011, performed in the Hard Rock Cafe in Santiago, Chile, during his Latin America tour in spring 2015. With a SUISA membership, authors can have their rights managed by a network made of more than 100 foreign sister societies. (Photo: Lorena Weber)

SUISA has entered into reciprocal agreements with over 100 sister societies abroad. In Switzerland and Liechtenstein it thus represents the repertoire of about 2 million authors and publishers from all over the world. At the same time, those agreements form the basis that SUISA members benefit from copyright fees collected abroad.

Cooperation between collective management organisations

The basic principle of international cooperation between collective management organisations is illustrated by the following example: For concerts in Switzerland or Liechtenstein, SUISA collects money for the copyright on the performed works from the event organiser. If the composers of the works are members of a foreign society, SUISA passes on the collected royalties to the relevant societies. These societies, in turn, pay the royalties in line with their own distribution rules to their members who have participated in the work.

Thanks to the reciprocal agreements, the money flow also takes place in reverse: For concerts abroad where works of SUISA members are performed, the local society of the relevant country collects the money, passes it on to SUISA which distributes it to the SUISA members entitled to receive a payment.

It does not matter where the musical activity or usage takes place: By means of this global network, SUISA can manage its members’ rights nearly everywhere. All it takes for this to happen is for creators to enter into a rights administration agreement with SUISA. By means of a rights administration agreement, authors assign their rights to SUISA, usually on a worldwide basis.

Rights Administration Agreement with SUISA

The rights administration agreement, in connection with the general administrative terms and conditions (AWB) is the most important link between SUISA and its members. With the conclusion of this agreement, SUISA is instructed to manage important pecuniary copyrights in Switzerland and abroad (via the sister societies) on a fiduciary basis.

It is also possible to limit the territories for which the rights are assigned to SUISA. Membership in several societies is an option, e.g. to have another society cover a specific geographic area. Both options are, however, linked with disadvantages: In the case of limiting the territorial scope, the authors have to manage their rights themselves or entrust another society with them. In the case of multi-society memberships, formalities of several societies have to be met – especially with a view to work registrations – and members would have to deal with questions such as double taxation, different distribution rules, statutes etc.

SUISA recommends not to make any exceptions to the rule, unless a member is particularly successful in another territory in the long run. Further information in the article “Play abroad, communicate with SUISA at home” in the section “Good to know” The advantage for members is that they have only one contact and don’t need to delve into all the different terms, conditions and rules. Finally, by entering into a rights administration agreement with SUISA, the rights are already managed on a global level as far as possible.

Rights management abroad

When it comes to copyright royalties arising from international musical activities, SUISA depends on the collaboration with its sister societies abroad. It is important to note that collections and distribution of the royalties vary from country to country and are subject to different rules.

It follows that the rights management via sister societies abroad is based on the regulations, tariffs, distribution rules and contracts valid in the respective country. Each sister society determines its modus operandi autonomously. SUISA can therefore not guarantee a 100% coverage of rights management and not be liable for the activities of its sister societies abroad. SUISA is not obliged to actively pursue copyrights abroad. If there is more than one sister society in a country, SUISA is going to enter into one or several reciprocal agreements with the sister society or sister societies of its choice.

SUISA can transfer royalties to its members once it has actually received them from the sister societies. Known uses abroad should be declared to the society in charge. We therefore recommend to inform SUISA if you take your activities up abroad. It is well worth it to use the global network to manage the rights of SUISA members.

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All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

Music doesn’t know any boundaries. Not just literally but also geographically: Once you have managed to make it abroad, a well-functioning network of local support can be of great use. This applies particularly for the administrative work and therefore also for types of copyright which cannot be paid out in cash there and then. SUISA has a global network and is engaged in activities, in cooperation with its foreign sister societies, to manage the rights of SUISA members as comprehensively as possible. Text by Irène Philipp, Director

A worldwide network for the rights of SUISA members

Bastian Baker, singer-songwriter from Lausanne, who has been a member of SUISA since 2011, performed in the Hard Rock Cafe in Santiago, Chile, during his Latin America tour in spring 2015. With a SUISA membership, authors can have their rights managed by a network made...read more