Tag Archives: Lyricist

«Get Going!» goes into the third round

«Get Going!» enables new perspectives: The idea of «Get Going!» is based on the philosophy of «making it possible». «Get Going!» consist of a start-up financing. Four such contributions of CHF 25 000.- each per year are advertised. Text by FONDATION SUISA

«Get Going!» goes into the third round

The recipients of the “Get Going!” contributions 2019 (from top left to bottom right): Anna Gosteli, Michel Barengo, Jessiquoi, Félix Bergeron (Iynnu) and Jérémie Zwahlen. (Photos: zVg)

«Get Going!» should be accessible to as many musically creative people as possible. Musicians should be restricted as little as possible in their creative ideas.

«Get Going!» 2020: Call for applications

Application deadline: 31.08.2020

The call for applications is intended to be broadly open and deliberately avoids the usual categories of musical genre, age or project.

Applications may be submitted by authors and musicians who can demonstrate a clear connection with the current Swiss or Liechtenstein music making.

Please note that:

  • We will not accept any additional documents, neither in electronic form nor as hard copies
  • We shall neither engage in any correspondence nor give any information by phone about the selection procedure and the final decision
  • If necessary, the jury may request further information
  • The jury, consisting of four members of the Board of Trustees, will evaluate the applications and make the final selection. The substance and originality of the applicant’s submission will play a decisive role in the selection.

To apply:

You have until 31.08.2020 to fill out the online form below:

«Get Going!» 2020 application form

In the course of autumn 2020, the jury will consider the submitted dossiers. You will then receive feedback on your application.

www.fondation-suisa.ch/en/work-grants

Related articles
Nik Bärtsch: “In this, we are all really challenged as a community”“In this, we are all really challenged as a community” With the “Music for tomorrowˮ project, SUISA aims to support its members in these difficult times. We offer artists a platform where they can talk about their current situation while in lockdown and present one of their works. This week we present the Swiss pianist, composer and music producer Nik Bärtsch and his piece “Modul 5ˮ. In the interview, Nik talks about his everyday life in lockdown with his family and what he has in common with an Australian emergency doctor. Read more
“Répondez-Moi”: Third Swiss ESC song from the SUISA Songwriting Camp“Répondez-Moi”: Third Swiss ESC song from the SUISA Songwriting Camp With “Répondez-Moi”, Switzerland is sending a French-language entry to the Eurovision Song Contest for the first time since 2010. The song was written by Gjon Muharremaj (Gjon’s Tears) and SUISA members Alizé Oswald and Xavier Michel of the Duo Aliose together with Belgian producer Jeroen Swinnen at the SUISA Songwriting Camp. Read more
Setting to musicSetting to music Whether they write choir music or a pop-song, composers are often inspired by an existing text which they want to use or excerpt in their new composition or song. What should you be mindful of in the use of third-party texts? How do you obtain permission to set a text to music, and what points should the permission cover? Read more
Collapse article

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

«Get Going!» enables new perspectives: The idea of «Get Going!» is based on the philosophy of «making it possible». «Get Going!» consist of a start-up financing. Four such contributions of CHF 25 000.- each per year are advertised. Text by FONDATION SUISA

«Get Going!» goes into the third round

The recipients of the “Get Going!” contributions 2019 (from top left to bottom right): Anna Gosteli, Michel Barengo, Jessiquoi, Félix Bergeron (Iynnu) and Jérémie Zwahlen. (Photos: zVg)

«Get Going!» should be accessible to as many musically creative people as possible. Musicians should be restricted as little as possible in their creative ideas.

«Get Going!» 2020: Call for applications

Application deadline: 31.08.2020

The call for applications is intended to be broadly open and deliberately avoids the usual categories of musical genre, age or project.

Applications may be submitted by authors and musicians who can demonstrate a clear connection...read more

“The crisis feels a little like being in a rehab clinic to me”

During the corona crisis, via its project “Music for Tomorrow”, SUISA is providing a platform for some members to report on their work and the challenges they are facing during this period. This time round, the Valaisian musician and songwriter Tanya Barany tells us why she hopes that people in this crisis have focussed their awareness of things like care, appreciation, solidarity or reflection and exclusively performs her song “Cotton Clouds”. Text by Giorgio Tebaldi; video by Tanya Barany, complemented by Nina Müller

“Dark like my British humour, but with a touch of fresh mountain air,” is how Tanya Barany describes her “Dark Pop”. Born and grown up in the Upper Valais, Tanja Zimmermann, that is what she is actually called, found her way to music at an early age: “I’ve been singing, dancing and performing all my life. The stages have simply become a bit bigger over time,” she says in a written interview. “What was once my bed has mutated into a Gampel Open Air stage.” Her musical career began with her first solo appearance with guitar at a children’s hit parade at the age of 11. At the age of 14 she founded the girl power trio Labyrinthzero, with which she released her first EP with her own compositions and played over 150 concerts at home and abroad.

Found a musical home

Decisive for her musical career was the encounter with Jonas Ruppen, who plays keyboard in her band and creates the videos: “He showed me the world of Radiohead, James Blake, etc. – and suddenly I had found my musical home!” The two have been playing music together for ten years now and work together on the overall concept of “Tanya Barany” – Tanya as songwriter and Jonas as video producer.

She began her musical education in 2014 by studying music at the Zurich University of the Arts, where she says that she was able to benefit from great teachers. “At the same time, I learned how to use the recording program LogicX, which took my songwriting in a completely different direction – my ‘Dark Pop’ saw the light of day!”

The debut album “Lights Disappear”

In 2019, Tanya Barany’s debut album “Lights Disappear” was released. Several performances on stages at home and abroad followed, e.g. Gampel Open Air, Zermatt Unplugged, Swiss Live Talents or at the Blue Balls Festival.

Besides her project Tanya Barany, she is a full-time studio singer and musician, songwriter, lyricist and vocal coach.

“Cotton Clouds”

For “Music for Tomorrow” Tanya Barany performed and recorded the song “Cotton Clouds”. She says the following about the work: “‘Cotton Clouds’ describes the feeling of immersion in water where suddenly everything around becomes silent; where suddenly another world appears. One the one hand, the water walls are depressing (almost oppressive), on the other hand they remind us of the security of an embrace. ‘Cotton Clouds’ is my unreleased hidden track. Like my songs on the album ‘Lights Disappear’, ‘Cotton Clouds’ grew out of the dark corner of my heart, but the track didn’t find a place on the album. I had composed ‘Cotton Clouds’ on the piano at that time; I prefer to play the piano alone for myself, without anyone listening to me. I chose ‘Cotton Clouds’ for ‘Music for Tomorrow’, because I want to invite the audience into my little lounge and take you on a little personal journey … :-)”

Tanya Barany, what does your working day as a composer/lyricist look like during the corona pandemic?
Tanya Barany: At the moment, I have more time to convert my song ideas into finished songs. Therefore, I try to generate as much output as possible – not only for me as Tanya Barany, but also as a ghostwriter for other artists. My partner, David Friedli – also a musician and composer – and I often write together. We move in all possible style directions – from folk to rock to pop to electro pop to soul etc. – it’s really fun!

What does this crisis mean for you personally?
The crisis feels a little like being in a rehab clinic to me. I don’t really want to be there – I miss performing live, cultural life and even planning ahead – who would have thought – and I can’t wait for normality to return.
On the other hand, this crisis also brings something valuable with it: Time! The world just seems to revolve a bit more slowly. Suddenly I am allowed to concentrate on things that are not necessarily on my having to do list but on the nice to do list – that feels incredibly good! This time has made “Reboot” possible, now I feel much more energetic and creative than before the crisis.

How can the audience support you at the moment?
My audience can best support me by telling all my friends and relatives about my music and telling them to buy the “Lights Disappear” CD! 🙂 Dark songs help through dark times … 🙂

Would it help if people on Spotify and Co. streamed your music more often?
When selecting live acts, the organisers look at the number of “listeners” on Spotify, YouTube etc. Therefore, it is surely an advantage if my music is streamed regularly on these platforms. It is also nice to see that my songs are even heard on the other side of the world! But to support me as an artist directly, I am always very grateful for purchased music on iTunes etc. or directly at concerts.

What do you think the current situation could bring with it?
I very much hope that people’s awareness will be sharpened somewhat – on all levels! A little more care, appreciation, solidarity, reflection – that would do us all good!

What do you want to give your fans to take away from this interview?
Dear fans, although it seems to be quieter around Tanya Barany at the moment, I’m working diligently in the background on a new concept, so that it will be even more cracking afterwards – so enjoy the calm before the storm! 🙂 I am already looking forward to presenting you new songs! Thanks for your support so far! Take care <3

www.tanyabarany.ch

“Music for Tomorrow”
The Covid-19 crisis has hit SUISA’s members particularly hard. The main source of income for many composers and publishers has completely been lost: Performances of any kind have been prohibited by the Federal Government until further notice. In the coming weeks, we will be posting portraits of some of our members on the SUISAblog. They will tell us what moves them during the Covid-19 crisis, what their challenges are and what their working day currently looks like. The musicians also performed and filmed their own composition for the SUISAblog at home or in their studio. SUISA pays the musicians a fee for this campaign.
Related articles
Information on live streams for SUISA membersInformation on live streams for SUISA members The corona measures led to a loss of performance and earning opportunities for music creators and to a painful loss of live music for music consumers. Live streaming therefore enjoys great popularity, especially in these times, and takes on a pertinent role in the cultural industry. Read more
Kety Fusco: “This situation will put everyone – musicians, technicians, insiders – to the test”“This situation will put everyone – musicians, technicians, insiders – to the test” With the “Music for tomorrow” project, SUISA aims to support its members in these difficult times. We offer artists a platform where they can talk about their current situation while in lockdown and present one of their works. The prelude is made by the Ticino composer and harpist Kety Fusco. In a written interview she talks about her everyday life in lockdown and why not that much has actually changed for her. Read more
Why SUISA members should also consider joining SWISSPERFORMWhy SUISA members should also consider joining SWISSPERFORM Composers and lyricists who are SUISA members and are also active as artists and/or producers and whose performances are broadcast by Swiss or foreign radio and TV channels are entitled to receive a remuneration from SWISSPERFORM. For all those authors-composers-artists/producers, a membership with SWISSPERFORM is thus a necessary addition to their SUISA affiliation in order to safeguard their rights and the full remuneration they are entitled to. Read more
Collapse article

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

During the corona crisis, via its project “Music for Tomorrow”, SUISA is providing a platform for some members to report on their work and the challenges they are facing during this period. This time round, the Valaisian musician and songwriter Tanya Barany tells us why she hopes that people in this crisis have focussed their awareness of things like care, appreciation, solidarity or reflection and exclusively performs her song “Cotton Clouds”. Text by Giorgio Tebaldi; video by Tanya Barany, complemented by Nina Müller

“Dark like my British humour, but with a touch of fresh mountain air,” is how Tanya Barany describes her “Dark Pop”. Born and grown up in the Upper Valais, Tanja Zimmermann, that is what she is actually called, found her way to music at an early age: “I’ve been...read more

Swiss Music Awards: Songwriters are awarded with the “Best Hit” award

This year, the Swiss Music Awards will honour the Swiss “Best Hit” of the previous year once again. But the award does not only go to the performers of the best hit: Thanks to SUISA, the songwriters of the winning song will also be honoured for the fifth time. Performing artists and songwriters talked about the development of the songs in interviews. Text by Giorgio Tebaldi

Swiss Music Awards: Songwriters are awarded with the “Best Hit” award

The nominees in the category “Best Hit” at the Swiss Music Awards: “Punto” by Loco Escrito, “She Got Me” by Luca Hänni and “Für immer uf Di” by Patent Ochsner. On behalf of SUISA, the composers are also honoured. (Photos: Nina Müller)

“She Got Me” by Luca Hänni, “Punto” by Loco Escrito and “Für immer uf Di” by Patent Ochsner were the most successful songs in the Swiss charts last year and are thus nominated for the Swiss Music Awards 2020 in the category “Best Hit”. However, there are no hits without songwriters: On behalf of SUISA, the composers of the “Best Hit” will also be honoured at the award show on 28 February 2020 in Lucerne’s KKL.

This award is intended to show and acknowledge the work of the songwriters behind the big hits, too. For Luca Hänni this is an important matter, as he points out in the video interview: “I think it is mega important that the songwriters are on board, too. That’s the be-all and end-all. With these people you have the feeling in the studio, you write stuff and bring the emotions into the computer.”

Three songs, nine songwriters

Besides Luca Hänni, five other songwriters have been nominated for the “Best Hit” award for “She Got Me”: The song was composed in just one day at the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018 by Luca Hänni, Laurell Barker (CAN), Jon Hällgren (SWE) and Frazer Mac (CAN). Until its finished version, which achieved an excellent fourth place for Switzerland at last year’s Eurovision Song Contest, the song was further refined together with Lukas Hällgren (SWE) and Jenson Vaughn (CAN).

Büne Huber, singer of Patent Ochsner, is also pleased that songwriting is honoured at the “Best Hit” award: “In many cases in music history, the people who provide important inputs to songs are not mentioned at all”, says Huber in the video interview. The only one of the three nominated songs “Für immer uf Di” was written by a single person: Büne Huber himself. The first song sketch was already drafted in 1994; only after the death of his mother, 24 years later, did he finish the song in a very short time.

Not only Loco Escrito can hope for a concrete block for “Punto”; the co-songwriter and producer Henrik Amschler is also in with hopes. The two have been writing the songs of Loco Escrito together for years and were already honoured with the “Best Hit” award in 2019 for the song “Adiòs”. Henrik Amschler is delighted that they could win the award again this year: “It is a huge acknowledgement that we have been nominated for the second time”, he says in an interview with SUISA. The song, which is about the end of a relationship, was created in a spontaneous session between Amschler and Loco Escrito – which is typical for the well-rehearsed team.

The winning song is chosen by the audience via telephone voting during the show.

  • “She Got Me”: Luca Hänni
    Songwriters: Laurell Barker, Luca Hänni, Jon Hällgren, Lukas Hällgren, Frazer Mac, Jenson Vaughn
  • “Punto”: Loco Escrito
    Songwriters: Henrik Amschler, Loco Escrito
  • “Für immer uf Di”: Patent Ochsner
    Songwriter: Büne Huber

Video interviews with nominees

During the interviews, Loco Escrito, Henrik Amschler, Büne Huber and Luca Hänni told us how their hits came about and what stories lie behind the songs. Videos of the interviews can be viewed on the SUISA Music Stories channel on Youtube:

Büne Huber from Patent Ochsner talks about the song “Für immer uf di”
Loco Escrito and Henrik Amschler in an interview about “Punto”
Luca Hänni talks about “She Got Me”

www.swissmusicawards.ch

Related articles
Switzerland will be represented at the Eurovision Song Contest by Luca Hänni and a song from the SUISA Songwriting Camp | plus videoSwitzerland will be represented at the Eurovision Song Contest by Luca Hänni and a song from the SUISA Songwriting Camp | plus video For the second time in succession, the Swiss entry for the Eurovision Song Contest has come from the SUISA Songwriting Camp. The song “She Got Me” was written last June at the Powerplay Studios by SUISA member Luca Hänni with Canadian songwriters Laurell Barker and Frazer Mac as well as Swedish producer Jon Hällgren. Read more
“Adiós”: Caribbean-style summer hit with a cembalo | plus video“Adiós”: Caribbean-style summer hit with a cembalo | plus video At the “Swiss Music Awards” 2019, together with four co-composers Loco Escrito can hope for the sought-after concrete blocks in the category “Best Hit” for the song “Adiós”. The musician and music university lecturer Hans Feigenwinter talks about where the strengths of the song lie in a video with his song analysis. Read more
Sampling and RemixesSampling and Remixes The articles about arrangements in the “Good to know” series have so far focused on “conventional” arrangements of musical works. Sampling and remixes are two additional and specific forms of arrangement. What rights need to be secured when existing recordings are used to produce a new work? What agreements have to be contracted? Read more
Award for songwriters at the Swiss Music Awards | plus videoAward for songwriters at the Swiss Music Awards | plus video The newcomer Nickless and the renowned producer Thomas Fessler won the first award for songwriters at the Swiss Music Awards 2016. The winning song “Waiting”, jointly composed by the two, didn’t appear out of thin air but is the result of lots of teamwork. At the occasion of the Swiss Music Awards 2017, SUISA will honour the performance of composers and lyricists with an award again. Read more
Collapse article

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

This year, the Swiss Music Awards will honour the Swiss “Best Hit” of the previous year once again. But the award does not only go to the performers of the best hit: Thanks to SUISA, the songwriters of the winning song will also be honoured for the fifth time. Performing artists and songwriters talked about the development of the songs in interviews. Text by Giorgio Tebaldi

Swiss Music Awards: Songwriters are awarded with the “Best Hit” award

The nominees in the category “Best Hit” at the Swiss Music Awards: “Punto” by Loco Escrito, “She Got Me” by Luca Hänni and “Für immer uf Di” by Patent Ochsner. On behalf of SUISA, the composers are also honoured. (Photos: Nina Müller)

“She Got Me” by Luca Hänni, “Punto” by Loco Escrito and “Für immer uf Di” by Patent Ochsner were the most successful songs in the...read more

Setting to music

Whether they write choir music or a pop-song, composers are often inspired by an existing text which they want to use or excerpt in their new composition or song. What should you be mindful of in the use of third-party texts? How do you obtain permission to set a text to music, and what points should the permission cover? Text by Claudia Kempf and Michael Wohlgemuth

Setting to music

Composers who wish to set another author’s text to their music must first clarify the relevant copyright issues. (Photo: Tabea Hüberli)

As previously underscored in the article “Arranging works protected by copyright”, authors – whether they compose music or write texts – have the right to decide if their work can be arranged; in other words, whether a “derived work” or an “arrangement” can be created from their original work. Texts which are not protected by copyright can be freely used as a basis for a musical work and can also be arranged at will. However, the use or arrangement of texts protected by copyright – i.e. whose authors are still alive or have been dead for less than 70 years – is subject to the rightholders’ consent. The end of the term of protection runs from 31 December of the year the last author alive dies.

Setting poems or parts of texts to music

To set a poem to music, you must first contact the author, their heirs or their publisher and obtain their direct consent to do so. As a rule, the arrangement rights in the case of literary works are held by the publisher; if not, the publisher can at least act as an intermediary. ProLitteris, the Swiss Copyright Society for Literature and the Visual Arts, cannot license these rights.

In the case of elements from a third-party text, the situation is a little trickier. In principle, copyright law does not only protect complete works, it also protects individual parts of a work, provided the term of protection has not expired and the individual parts satisfy the qualifying criteria of a work or impact the individuality of the complete work. Elements of a text (known as “external value”) as well as the plot or characters of a novel (known as “inner value”) can therefore be protected and may not be used at will if in themselves they constitute a work with an individual character or if they impact the individuality of the work as a whole. Copyright law does not only protect entire passages from “The Lord of the Rings”, for example, it also protects Gandalf, the pipe-smoking wizard.

Unfortunately, there is no clear boundary delimiting what parts of a work have individual character or impact an entire work, and what parts do not. The following questions may help you decide: is the excerpt or the inner value in itself so unique that it hardly occurs elsewhere? The length of the excerpt and characteristic elements like names or special word creations can be decisive here. Further: does the excerpt occupy a formative place in the new work?

New settings to music or recording new lyrics

The same applies if you take the lyrics of an existing song and set them to a new melody. This is a new setting to music. In this case, however, you cannot obtain the rights just from the lyricist; you must obtain the rights to the whole musical work from all the original rightholders (i.e. the lyricists and the composers) or from the music publisher. In other words, in the case of jointly created works, consent must be obtained from all the rightholders and not just from the lyricist since you are changing a work that was created to be exploited jointly. Settings to music, on the other hand, are not as a rule regarded as jointly created works. Therefore, each rightholder is free to dispose of their own contribution.

When new lyrics are added to the melody of a song, the legal situation is the same – it is still an arrangement of a musical work. This also applies to the translation of lyrics into another language; even if the contents are identical, a translation is an arrangement requiring consent because it impacts the individuality of the original work.

NB: If you use a translation of a work whose term of protection has expired, you must establish whether the translation is still protected (translations are derived works and as such are also protected by copyright).

Obtaining permission for setting to music or for an arrangement can be an extremely tedious procedure which is not always crowned with success. In any event, you must be sure to allow enough time to clarify the legal status.

Warning: no silent consent!
If a number of requests have been submitted to the rightholder or the (music) publisher and no response has been received, it is wrong to presume that “silence means consent” and that the work can be arranged simply because “efforts were made” to obtain permission. As a rule, arranging a work without the rightholder’s consent constitutes a copyright infringement and may result in civil and criminal prosecution.

Once you have obtained permission to set to music or undertake an arrangement, you still cannot dispose of the work at will. The permission to set to music, for example, often contains a proviso that the original text must be used faithfully, i.e. that no changes can be made to the original. The permission to arrange may be restricted to a single type of arrangement (e.g. only the translation of the lyrics into another language, or only the use of specific excerpts). Moreover, even after granting permission, authors are entitled by law to defend their work against “distortion”. Such cases (which are hard to judge) constitute an infringement of the author’s “moral rights”.

A special case: the “sub-lyricist”
In sub-publishing agreements, the original publisher sometimes grants the sub-publisher the right to have new language versions of an existing song made. The sub-publisher is thus empowered to commission or authorise translations of the lyrics or new lyrics in another language. In such cases, the lyricist is registered as “sub-lyricist”. SUISA’s Distribution Rules provide that the sub-lyricists’ share may not be higher than provided in the regulatory distribution key.

Freedom to quote

Is it possible in certain circumstances to “quote” texts without any permission to set to music when creating a musical work? In Switzerland, literary works may be quoted without permission if the quotation serves as an explanation, reference or illustration and provided the source, i.e. the original author, is indicated (see Article 25 FCA). However, case law stipulates that the quotation may not be “purely an end to itself”, in other words the quotation must serve explanatory or information purposes and cannot principally serve to obtain an advantage from the recognition value of the quotation. Whether these conditions can be met in the case of setting to music and publishing is a matter of interpretation, as is often the case, and can only be answered affirmatively with great restraint. In doubt, it is always better to ask the rightholder.

Key points of a permission to set to music

If an author or a publisher grants permission to set a text to music, this permission or consent to set to music should be set forth in a short agreement. The agreement should cover the following points:

  • Name and address of the contracting parties (and aliases, if applicable)
  • Permission to set to music: the work to be set to music must be named. The agreement must also specify to what extent the text may be edited or arranged. It must define the scope of usage, indicate if printing rights are included and, in case the setting to music is published, whether the author of the text must be designated, and how. The agreement must also indicate whether and how the new work is to be registered with SUISA. Setting-to-music agreements are generally non-exclusive. The composers do not derive any rights to the text from such agreements. These rights remain entirely with the author of the text.
  • Share of the author of the text: SUISA’s Distribution Rules grant equal shares to the composer of the music and the lyricist or author of the text. In the case of unpublished works, the share is 50% each; for published works, the share is 33.33%. As a rule, however, the shares may be set at the parties’ discretion. Book publishers do not often participate in the exploitation rights of the sound recording unless they are members of a copyright collecting society for music and the permission for setting to music provides for such participation.
    The original rightholders often demand a flat-rate fee for the setting to music, and in certain cases the publisher also demands a percentage share on the sale of sheet music if the graphic rights are transferred.
  • Publishing of the setting to music: the text share of the setting to music is not automatically transferred to the music publisher. The publisher must conclude a separate publishing agreement with the author of the text in respect of this share. The publishing rights of major authors are often already held by a book publisher and cannot be transferred to the music publisher.
  • Warranties: the rightholders must warrant that they dispose of the rights to grant the arrangement rights.
  • Place, date and signature of the rightholders
  • Governing law and jurisdiction

How to register a setting to music with SUISA

To register the setting to music of a protected text, you must provide the permission to set to music. If no specific percentage shares were agreed, SUISA’s Distribution Rules will apply. If the author of the text is not member of a music collecting society and does not wish to join one, SUISA will accept transfers to the composers. In this case, the composer and the author of the text will both appear in the database as authors, but both shares will be paid to the composer. The corresponding consent from the author of the text is mandatory.

Summary

As a rule, to set a poem to music you always need permission from the rightholder(s) – depending on the circumstances, this permission can be obtained from the authors, their heirs or the relevant publisher. The permission for setting to music is a prerequisite for registering a protected text with SUISA and is the legal basis for participation in the revenues from the work.

As a rule, for a setting to music, you need to contact the book publisher. For texts which have not been published, ProLitteris can help you identify the relevant rightholders. SUISA can only help if the author is one of its members. In such cases, SUISA will pass on requests for setting to music to the authors or their heirs. Requests should be sent to: authors (at) suisa (dot) ch

Related articles
Arrangement of works in the public domainArrangement of works in the public domain Before you start arranging musical works that are not protected by copyright, it is worth being aware of the legal pitfalls in order to avoid costly stumbles. Seeking inspiration from others, arranging existing works for different instrumentation, incorporating all or part of existing compositions into new works … these are age-old practices. Read more
Arranging works protected by copyrightArranging works protected by copyright Musical works in the public domain can be arranged at will. But works which are still protected by copyright, i.e. whose author has been dead for less than 70 years, cannot be arranged without permission from the rightholders. How does one go about obtaining such permission, and what points must be regulated in the permission in order to be able to register an arrangement with SUISA? Read more
Sampling and RemixesSampling and Remixes The articles about arrangements in the “Good to know” series have so far focused on “conventional” arrangements of musical works. Sampling and remixes are two additional and specific forms of arrangement. What rights need to be secured when existing recordings are used to produce a new work? What agreements have to be contracted? Read more
Collapse article
  1. E.Rick Sommer says:

    Guten Tag Frau Leuenberger
    ich habe vor einiger Zeit eine CD aufgenommen mit dem Name (Drei rote Rosen Nr. 577) worauf sich die Songs Immer nur du und Mondscheinnacht befinden. Jetzt habe ich festgestellt dass andere Musiker diese Stücke auf einer CD veröffentlicht haben. Wäre da nicht eine Gutschrift fällig.
    Danke für eine Antwort.
    mfg E. Rick Sommer

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Sehr geehrter Herr Sommer
      Vielen Dank für Ihren Kommentar. Zur Beantwortung Ihrer konkreten Anfrage besteht weiterer Abklärungsbedarf. Bei spezifischen Einzelfällen wie diesem empfehlen wir deshalb, direkt den Rechtsdienst der SUISA zu kontaktieren: legalservices (at) suisa (dot) ch
      Freundliche Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger / SUISA Kommunikation

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

Whether they write choir music or a pop-song, composers are often inspired by an existing text which they want to use or excerpt in their new composition or song. What should you be mindful of in the use of third-party texts? How do you obtain permission to set a text to music, and what points should the permission cover? Text by Claudia Kempf and Michael Wohlgemuth

Setting to music

Composers who wish to set another author’s text to their music must first clarify the relevant copyright issues. (Photo: Tabea Hüberli)

As previously underscored in the article “Arranging works protected by copyright”, authors – whether they compose music or write texts – have the right to decide if their work can be arranged; in other words, whether a “derived work” or an “arrangement” can be created from...read more

SUISA Songwriting Camp 2019 now open for applications by SUISA members | plus video

The third SUISA Songwriting Camp shall take place between 24 and 26 June 2019 in the Powerplay Studios in Maur near Zurich. SUISA members may exclusively apply for a participation. The event, jointly organised between SUISA and Pele Loriano Productions, has already spawned several internationally successful pop songs. “She Got Me”, sung and co-written by Luca Hänni, was the second song in a row selected from the SUISA Songwriting Camp to represent Switzerland at the ESC. Text and video by Manu Leuenberger

With the SUISA Songwriting Camp, SUISA offers some of its members the opportunity to team up and compose pop songs with internationally renowned producers and songwriters. Swiss Duo Aliose participated in the most recent SUISA Songwriting Camp. The two SUISA members explain in the video how they perceived their participation.

Those who wish to participate in the Songwriting Camp need to have well-founded musical knowledge, be able to produce high-level creative output when pressed for time and be open for criticism and an exchange with their co-writers.

The challenging task is: To write a pop song in a team which consists of three to five persons within a day, according to certain specifications – you start with a blank sheet of paper in the morning and don’t finish until you have completed a demo track by the evening.

Pop songs with hit potential

The musical style of the songs can comprise all facets of temporary pop music, which could also be successful in the charts, on streaming platforms or on radio/TV. The songs are intended to be offered to publishers and artists on the one hand, and also be suitable for the Eurovision Song Contest on the other hand.

36 music creators from Switzerland and other countries had taken part in the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018. Of the 19 songs which were written during last year’s instalment of the event, two compositions have meanwhile reached international fame: The works “She Got Me” and “Sister” will feature in the final round of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019 in Tel Aviv for Switzerland and Germany, respectively.

Applications for the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2019

The third SUISA Songwriting Camp shall take place between 24 and 26 June 2019 in the Powerplay Studios in Maur near Zurich. The event is jointly organised by SUISA and Pele Loriano Productions. Pele Loriano Productions is responsible for the artistic direction of the Songwriting Camp on behalf of SUISA.

SUISA members can now apply to take part in the SUISA Songwriter Camp 2019. Are you a producer, songwriter (topliner), or a lyricist and do you think you can fulfil the requirements regarding musical skills and abilities? In that case, please send us your application which should contain the following:

  • a short biography;
  • meaningful reference songs (mp3 files or internet links);
  • contact details.

Please e-mail the applications to the following address: songwritingcamp (at) suisa (dot) ch
Closing date for applications: Monday, 22 April 2019

Important: Participants’ spaces are only allocated to SUISA members by way of this application process. Those who apply should be able to guarantee that they are available to participate on one or all of the event days (24 to 26 June 2019).

Dates and selection of the participants

The selection of all artists who are invited to the camp shall be done via the artistic director. A suitable mix of participants is paramount for the creative success of the songwriting sessions.

The artistic programme director will directly communicate any acceptance messages and invitations as well as further details on the participation at the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2019 by 31 May 2019.

Rejection letters will not be sent. If you have not received an acceptance message by 31 May 2019 you were not taken into consideration for the Songwriting Camp 2019.

The number of applications is expected to exceed the number of available participants’ spaces by far. Please note that, at no time whatsoever, any claims arise to a participation in the event by sending in an application. There will also not be any correspondence in relation to the actual allocation of spaces. It is not possible to comment on any further Songwriting Camps supported by SUISA at this stage.

Related articles
Switzerland will be represented at the Eurovision Song Contest by Luca Hänni and a song from the SUISA Songwriting CampSwitzerland will be represented at the Eurovision Song Contest by Luca Hänni and a song from the SUISA Songwriting Camp | plus video For the second time in succession, the Swiss entry for the Eurovision Song Contest has come from the SUISA Songwriting Camp. The song “She Got Me” was written last June at the Powerplay Studios by SUISA member Luca Hänni with Canadian songwriters Laurell Barker and Frazer Mac as well as Swedish producer Jon Hällgren. Read more
Eurovision Song Contest: SUISA Songwriting Camp song in the German qualifierEurovision Song Contest: SUISA Songwriting Camp song in the German qualifier | plus video Success for the SUISA Songwriting Camp: The song “Sister” created during last year’s camp is in the German ESC qualifier. The piece was composed and produced by an international songwriting team consisting of Marine Kaltenbacher, Laurell Barker, Tom Oehler and Thomas Stengaard. Read more
Dual memberships: SUISA, and what else?Dual memberships: SUISA, and what else? SUISA manages the rights for its members globally. You should carefully review and consider the relevant effort and income if you wanted to become a member of several authors’ societies. If you live outside of Switzerland or the Principality of Liechtenstein, you can also become a SUISA member. Last but not least, it is also possible to be a member of another collective management organisation in addition to your SUISA membership. The following FAQs are intended to summarise what you need to consider when contemplating a so-called dual membership. Read more
Collapse article
  1. Busseniers says:

    J ai eu la chance d avoir un feedback de Jeroen Swinnen, le belge, ce qui m a permis de bien evoluer
    C est egalement , a Jeroen Swinnen, que j ai achete le digidesign pro tools ,
    Merveilleux engin
    Bonne journee a Vous
    Christian Busseniers

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

The third SUISA Songwriting Camp shall take place between 24 and 26 June 2019 in the Powerplay Studios in Maur near Zurich. SUISA members may exclusively apply for a participation. The event, jointly organised between SUISA and Pele Loriano Productions, has already spawned several internationally successful pop songs. “She Got Me”, sung and co-written by Luca Hänni, was the second song in a row selected from the SUISA Songwriting Camp to represent Switzerland at the ESC. Text and video by Manu Leuenberger

With the SUISA Songwriting Camp, SUISA offers some of its members the opportunity to team up and compose pop songs with internationally renowned producers and songwriters. Swiss Duo Aliose participated in the most recent SUISA Songwriting Camp. The two SUISA members explain in the video how they perceived their participation.

Those...read more

Charles Aznavour’s songs are part of our collective identity

Charles Aznavour joined SUISA in 1976 and was one of our best-known members. The countless tributes on TV, radio and in the press around the world since his death are a reminder, if one was necessary, of the scale of his legend. They can also teach us a few important lessons. Obituary by Xavier Dayer, President of SUISA

Charles Aznavour’s songs are part of our collective identity

Charles Aznavour, pictured at the Teatro Regio di Parma on 30 October 2009, wrote lyrics and music for innumerable chansons over the course of his career. (Photo: Fabio Diena / Shutterstock)

As a singer and performer, Charles Aznavour was a genius, yet he was also an extraordinary composer and lyricist and he highlighted this essential aspect of his activities time and time again.

In the public archives of French authors’ rights society SACEM, we can find the entrance examination he took to join the society as an author in 1947. Yes, it’s true: at that time all new members had to pass an entrance exam! It is particularly moving to read the lyrics to a song called “Si je voulais”, corrected by SACEM in red ink.

It’s a powerful reminder of the steps taken by Charles Aznavour, son of Armenian immigrants, on his path from obscurity to global fame. One cannot help but see this journey as a hymn to the openness of our modern societies to the constant acceptance and awareness that cultures are enriched by these ties. At this very moment, a “Charles Aznavour” of tomorrow might be on a boat crossing the Mediterranean.

Today, Aznavour’s gravelly voice and his songs, with their distinctive words and melodies, are a part of who we are, our collective identity. His work is part of our “today” and his career is a message of hope to all creators.

Words are always pale in comparison with the power of musical expression. They cannot convey how deeply grateful we are at SUISA to have handled rights management for Charles Aznavour. This is truly an immense honour and we would like to offer our sincere condolences to his loved ones.

www.aznavourfoundation.org

Collapse article

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

Charles Aznavour joined SUISA in 1976 and was one of our best-known members. The countless tributes on TV, radio and in the press around the world since his death are a reminder, if one was necessary, of the scale of his legend. They can also teach us a few important lessons. Obituary by Xavier Dayer, President of SUISA

Charles Aznavour’s songs are part of our collective identity

Charles Aznavour, pictured at the Teatro Regio di Parma on 30 October 2009, wrote lyrics and music for innumerable chansons over the course of his career. (Photo: Fabio Diena / Shutterstock)

As a singer and performer, Charles Aznavour was a genius, yet he was also an extraordinary composer and lyricist and he highlighted this essential aspect of his activities time and time again.

In the public archives of French authors’ rights society SACEM, we can find...read more

“A Cello talks like a human”

Apart from his activities as a paediatrician, Dr. Beat Richner has been a musician all of his life. From 1972 onwards, he performed under the pseudonym “Beaotcello”. For his poetic and cabaret music programmes, he wrote music and lyrics of several works himself. The long-term SUISA member passed away in the early hours of Sunday, 09 September 2018 at the age of 71. Text by Manu Leuenberger

Beat Richner: “A Cello talks like a human”

The paediatrician who played music, Dr. Beat Richner – here a production image from the movie “L’Ombrello di Beatocello” by Georges Gachot – had been a SUISA member since 1978. (Photo: Gachot Films / www.lombrellodibeatocello.com)

Beat Richner was born on 13 March 1947 and grew up in Zurich. After taking his baccalaureat, he dedicated himself to music for a year. The 19-year-old publicly performed a programme called “Träumerei eines Nachtwächters” (Musings of a night watchman). During his subsequent studies of medicine, he developed the character of the music clown “Beatocello”. Beat Richner became known in the Swiss cabaret scene under said pseudonym. In the context of his humanitarian engagement in Cambodia, the paediatrician-musician also attracted interest abroad.

In 1978, Beat Richner became a SUISA member. He was the composer and lyricist of songs which he wrote mainly for the Beatocello music programmes. His compositions carry titles such as “Chatz und Muus” (cat and mouse), “SʼTröpfli” (the droplet), “Zirkus” (circus), “Doctor PC” (doctor PC), or “Dong und Deng” (Dong and Deng) and have been recorded onto various CDs. Other recordings feature the cello player as a performer of works by Bach, Vivaldi and Bruch.

The cello was a loyal companion for Dr. Beat Richner. In an interview with the “Schweizer Illustrierten”, he mentioned that he played the instrument for 30 to 40 minutes every day. That way, he would stay fit to play during concerts which he held each Saturday in Siam Rep for visitors from all over the world in order to inform about the hospitals he founded and to raise donations. “A cello does talk like a human then”, Beat Richner said during the interview. “A simple, a warm and comforting voice.”

www.beat-richner.ch

Collapse article
  1. Dodo Leo says:

    An Beatocello erinnere ich mich oft, immer wieder gerne und, als wenn es gestern gewesen wäre, dass ich seine Lieder gehört habe.
    Das trifft es aber eigentlich nicht ganz, viel mehr war Hr. Richners Figur eine ständige und haltgebende Begleitung meiner Kindheit. Der Umstand, warum ich seiner Musik und Geschichten als Kind begegnete, kommt daher, dass ein erheblicher Teil dieser Kindheit – vor allem in der früheren Phase – im Kinderspital stattfand. Ich hatte ein kleines, silbergraues Kassettengerät, mit dem man nur vorwärt spulen konnte, und das ein bisschen schepperte. Das machte mir nichts aus, denn was ich hörte, war viel mehr als Musik. Es waren Gefühle des Trostes, Linderung der Angst.
    Wenn Hr. Richner in dem Interview mit der »Schweizer Illustrierten« davon sprach, das Cello würde “sprechen wie ein Mensch”, dann kann ich das nur bestätigen. Für mich war es ganz genau so, ich erinnere mich gut. Einmal, so meine ich mich jedenfalls ebenfalls erinnern zu können, war er sogar bei uns auf der Station. Aber, vielleicht ist das auch Wunschdenken eines Erwachsenen, der sich wünscht, es wäre damals so gewesen. Irgendwie war er sowieso immer da.
    Ich halte inne und senke mein Haupt, verbeuge mich in tiefer Annerkennung und Dankbarkeit an einen selbstlosen Mann, der mir und vielen anderen im Leben so viel gegeben hat und sage; Danke Hr. Richner.
    Dodo Leo

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

Apart from his activities as a paediatrician, Dr. Beat Richner has been a musician all of his life. From 1972 onwards, he performed under the pseudonym “Beaotcello”. For his poetic and cabaret music programmes, he wrote music and lyrics of several works himself. The long-term SUISA member passed away in the early hours of Sunday, 09 September 2018 at the age of 71. Text by Manu Leuenberger

Beat Richner: “A Cello talks like a human”

The paediatrician who played music, Dr. Beat Richner – here a production image from the movie “L’Ombrello di Beatocello” by Georges Gachot – had been a SUISA member since 1978. (Photo: Gachot Films / www.lombrellodibeatocello.com)

Beat Richner was born on 13 March 1947 and grew up in Zurich. After taking his baccalaureat, he dedicated himself to music for a year. The 19-year-old publicly performed a programme...read more

Applications for the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018

SUISA organises another Songwriting Camp together with Pele Loriano Productions. The second SUISA Songwriting Camp will be held between 18 and 20 June 2018. SUISA members can apply to participate. Text by Manu Leuenberger

Applications for the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018

The SUISA Songwriting Camp is taking place for a second time in June 2018. Above, a group shot of participants is shown, taken at the Powerplay Studios during the successful première of the Songwriting Camp in August 2017. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

The SUISA Songwriting Camp takes place for a second time after its successful première in the summer of 2017 (4 songs from the camp made it to the Swiss ESC final, among them the winning song “Stones”). This year, the Songwriting Camp will be held between Monday 18 and Wednesday 20 June 2018. Planned venue for the event are the Powerplay Studios in Maur near Zurich.

The goal of the Songwriting Camp is to compose pop songs, tailored for radio broadcasts and capable of storming the charts, with the potential to comprise all facets of temporary pop – in the range of “urban” to singer/songwriter. Resulting songs shall have the spectrum to be offered to publishers and artists from the pop scene and to be viable material for the Eurovision Song Contest.

Spaces for SUISA member participation

The exact number of participants’ spaces at the Songwriting Camp will only be made known once the exact set up of the participating songwriters has been completed. At least half of the participants’ spaces are available for SUISA members from all regions of Switzerland. SUISA members will benefit from the opportunity to compose pieces of music together with other professional songwriters from all over the world at the Songwriting Camp.

Participants are expected to exhibit well-versed musical competencies, team spirit, creativity and efficient working styles. Teams of 3-5 people are presented with the task to write a song from scratch within one day during the “songwriting sessions” – the result is a demo version of the completed piece in the evening.

In order to make this cooperation a success, participants must be able to retrieve their creative potential and be open for critique in the exchange with the co-composers. SUISA members Kate Northrop, Lars Christen, Chiara Dubey, Alejandro Reyes and the siblings Co & Stee Gfeller aka Zibbz report of their experience during last year’s SUISA Songwriting Camp in video interviews.

Applications for the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018

SUISA members may apply for participation in the Songwriting Camp. We are looking for producers, lyricists, composers and songwriters who wish to participate for one or several days at the SUISA Songwriting Camp.

Applications should contain:

  • a short biography;
  • meaningful reference songs (mp3 files or internet links);
  • contact infos (including valid e-mail addresses and phone numbers).

The applications with the documentation should be sent via e-mail, including the subject line “Application – SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018” to:
songwritingcamp (at) suisa (dot) ch
The deadline for applications is 8 April 2018.

Selection process and dates

International artists as well as participating SUISA members are selected by the artistic programme director of the Songwriting Camp. A harmonious mix of participants is paramount for the creative success of the “Songwriting Sessions”. Pele Loriano Productions are going to take on the artistic programme directorship on behalf of SUISA.

The artistic programme director will directly communicate any acceptance messages and invitations as well as further details on the participation at the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018 by 31 May 2018.

There will be no mail-out of letters of rejection. If you have not received an acceptance message by 31 May 2018 you were not taken into consideration for the Songwriting Camp 2018. Please note that, at no time whatsoever, any claims arise to a participation in the event by sending in an application. There will also not be any correspondence in relation to the actual allocation of spaces. It is currently unconfirmed whether or not SUISA will continue to co-organise Songwriting Camps after June 2018.

Related articles
“You always want to write the best song you can” | plus video“You always want to write the best song you can” | plus video Songwriter Kate Northrop is primarily a lyricist, a creative role that doesn’t often land her in the spotlight. Together with three other authors, the SUISA member co-wrote Naeman’s entry to the Eurovision Song Contest, “Kiss Me”. In a video interview, Kate Northrop explains how she came up with the song lyrics and how she was inspired by the songwriting camp organised by SUISA and Pele Loriano Productions. Read more
“We wanted to write a song that suits us” | plus video“We wanted to write a song that suits us” | plus video Siblings Co and Stee Gfeller, better known as ZiBBZ, are battling it out for entry to the Eurovision Song Contest with their song “Stones”. They wrote the song together with Canadian songwriter Laurell Barker at the songwriting camp staged by Pele Loriano Productions and SUISA in August 2017. In the video, the two siblings tell us more about how the song came about and why this kind of songwriting camp is so important. Read more
Eurovision Song Contest: Swiss songwriting camp by Pele Loriano Productions and SUISA a huge successEurovision Song Contest: Swiss songwriting camp by Pele Loriano Productions and SUISA a huge success The Swiss broadcaster SRF announced the six songs that will be in the running for the Swiss entry to the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC) 2018 today. Four of the six entries were created at the Swiss songwriting camp held by Pele Loriano Productions and SUISA at Powerplay Studios in Maur. Read more
Collapse article

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

SUISA organises another Songwriting Camp together with Pele Loriano Productions. The second SUISA Songwriting Camp will be held between 18 and 20 June 2018. SUISA members can apply to participate. Text by Manu Leuenberger

Applications for the SUISA Songwriting Camp 2018

The SUISA Songwriting Camp is taking place for a second time in June 2018. Above, a group shot of participants is shown, taken at the Powerplay Studios during the successful première of the Songwriting Camp in August 2017. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

The SUISA Songwriting Camp takes place for a second time after its successful première in the summer of 2017 (4 songs from the camp made it to the Swiss ESC final, among them the winning song “Stones”). This year, the Songwriting Camp will be held between Monday 18 and Wednesday 20 June 2018. Planned venue for the event...read more

“You always want to write the best song you can” | plus video

Songwriter Kate Northrop is primarily a lyricist, a creative role that doesn’t often land her in the spotlight. Together with three other authors, the SUISA member co-wrote Naeman’s entry to the Eurovision Song Contest, “Kiss Me”. In a video interview, Kate Northrop explains how she came up with the song lyrics and how she was inspired by the songwriting camp organised by SUISA and Pele Loriano Productions. Text by Giorgio Tebaldi, video by Manu Leuenberger

Behind every good song is a good songwriter – and in the case of “Kiss Me”, there were four. The song is among the Swiss finalists for the Eurovision Song Contest 2018, and is performed by Naeman. It was written by Alejandro Reyes from Lausanne, Ken Berglund from Sweden, Eric Lumière from the USA and Kate Northrop.

Kate originally comes from the USA, now lives in Switzerland, and helped write the lyrics. The story the song tells is the result of a team effort: “First, we all told each other what we thought the song’s story was”, the songwriter explains. “Then we tried to capture that with music, words and – above all – emotions.”

Kate had written songs with a number of different co-authors before, but the process at the songwriting camp was an entirely new experience for her: she had 12 hours to write a finished song with a group of artists she had never met before. Kate loved this method of songwriting: “Working with these artists was incredibly inspiring”, she says. “In order to create something, you have to be open to creative ideas from the rest of the group.”

The fact that the songs written at the songwriting camp were being written for the Eurovision Song Contest made no difference to Kate: “I don’t think writing for the Eurovision Song Contest is different from writing any other kind of song. You always want to write the best song you can.”

www.songwave.ch, Kate Northrop’s website

Related articles
“Taking part in the songwriting camp was a big win” | plus video“Taking part in the songwriting camp was a big win” | plus video “Compass” is one of the final six Swiss songs competing for entry to the Eurovision Song Contest 2018. It is sung by Alejandro Reyes, who wrote it together with Canadian Laurell Barker and Swiss composer and producer Lars Christen. In an interview with SUISA, Lars Christen talks about the songwriting process. He also explains why he found the songwriting camp such a valuable experience. Read more
Eurovision Song Contest: Swiss songwriting camp by Pele Loriano Productions and SUISA a huge successEurovision Song Contest: Swiss songwriting camp by Pele Loriano Productions and SUISA a huge success The Swiss broadcaster SRF announced the six songs that will be in the running for the Swiss entry to the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC) 2018 today. Four of the six entries were created at the Swiss songwriting camp held by Pele Loriano Productions and SUISA at Powerplay Studios in Maur. Read more
Lyrics for a song: “Anything goes – if it has success”Lyrics for a song: “Anything goes – if it has success” The FONDATION SUISA dedicates its CHF 25,000 recognition award to lyricists of musical works this year. But what makes a song text a success? Guest author Markus Ganz in an interview with journaliste Jean-Martin Büttner. Read more
Collapse article

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

Songwriter Kate Northrop is primarily a lyricist, a creative role that doesn’t often land her in the spotlight. Together with three other authors, the SUISA member co-wrote Naeman’s entry to the Eurovision Song Contest, “Kiss Me”. In a video interview, Kate Northrop explains how she came up with the song lyrics and how she was inspired by the songwriting camp organised by SUISA and Pele Loriano Productions. Text by Giorgio Tebaldi, video by Manu Leuenberger

Behind every good song is a good songwriter – and in the case of “Kiss Me”, there were four. The song is among the Swiss finalists for the Eurovision Song Contest 2018, and is performed by Naeman. It was written by Alejandro Reyes from Lausanne, Ken Berglund from Sweden, Eric Lumière from the USA and Kate Northrop.

Kate...read more

Application process for the Schedler Music Songwriter Camp 2018 now open to SUISA members

For the sixth time now, Rudi Schedler Musikverlag GmbH is organising the international “Pop & Schlager Songwriter Camp” between 13 and 18 January 2018. SUISA members may submit their application for a place in the Schedler Music Songwriter Camp 2018 until 31 October 2017. Text by Fiona Schedler, Schedler Music

Application process for the Schedler Music Songwriter Camp 2018 now open to SUISA members

International teamwork during the Schedler Music Songwriter Camp 2016: Luca Hänni, from Berne (in the background, on the right) composed a song together with Dillon Dixon, from the USA (left) and Erik Wigelius, from Sweden. (Photo: Ratko Photography)

At the “Pop & Schlager Songwriter Camp” by Schedler Music, songwriters from more than seven countries, in teams of three, compose potential hits of tomorrow under the motto “It’s all about the song” over a period of five days. A total of 35 national and international composers take part in the camp, whereby five places are specifically allocated to SUISA members. Composers, lyricists and producers may, with immediate effect and until 31 October 2017 at the latest, apply for participation in the Schedler Music Songwriter Camp which will be held between 13 and 18 January 2018 in Steeg, Austria.

Application, selection process, participation

The participation spaces shall be allocated by way of a selection process. If you are a composer, lyricist or producer and wish to participate in the “Pop & Schlager Songwriter Camp”, please submit:

  • a short biography (keywords are sufficient)
  • and reference songs (mp3 files or links)

via e-mail, stating the reference “Application – Pop & Schlager Songwriter Camp” to the following address: summit (at) schedlermusic (dot) com. Please mention in your application that you are a SUISA member. Closing date will be 31/10/2017. Schedler Music will get in touch with the songwriters that have been selected by the end of November.

Application process for the Schedler Music Songwriter Camp 2018 now open to SUISA members

Enthusiastic participants at the Songwriter Camp 2016: Slovenian songwriter team Sasa Lendero (in the middle) and Mihael Hercog (on the left) with German lyricist Oliver Lukas. (Photo: Ratko Photography)

Schedler Music Summit 2018

Immediately after the songwriter camp, the music industry meeting “Schedler Music Summit” takes place on 18 and 19 January 2018. Any newly created songs from the Camp will be showcased at this occasion in the course of a “song presentation” on Thursday, 18 January 2018 (from 8.00 pm) to the music industry audience.

Further information on the camp is available on the following website: www.schedlermusicsummit.com.
The Camp/Summit Aftermovie 2017, also provides a great insight.

 Related articles
First Swiss songwriting camp for the Eurovision Song ContestFirst Swiss songwriting camp for the Eurovision Song Contest The Powerplay Studios in Maur recently played host to renowned songwriters and producers from Switzerland and abroad as they attended a songwriting camp to write entries for arguably the most famous music competition in Europe – the Eurovision Song Contest. This is the first time that a songwriting camp like this for the ESC has taken place in Switzerland. The camp was supported by SUISA, the cooperative society for composers, lyricists and publishers of music in Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Read more
Publishers’ participation at SUISA not at riskPublishers’ participation at SUISA not at risk A decision by the European Court of Justice dating back to 2015 and two German court decisions made last year have challenged the basic principle of a participation of publishers with respect to remuneration paid out by collective management organisations. Here are the reasons why what happened at Gema cannot repeat itself at SUISA. Read more
Lyrics for a song: “Anything goes – if it has success”Lyrics for a song: “Anything goes – if it has success” The FONDATION SUISA dedicates its CHF 25,000 recognition award to lyricists of musical works this year. But what makes a song text a success? Guest author Markus Ganz in an interview with journaliste Jean-Martin Büttner. Read more

 

Collapse article

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

For the sixth time now, Rudi Schedler Musikverlag GmbH is organising the international “Pop & Schlager Songwriter Camp” between 13 and 18 January 2018. SUISA members may submit their application for a place in the Schedler Music Songwriter Camp 2018 until 31 October 2017. Text by Fiona Schedler, Schedler Music

Application process for the Schedler Music Songwriter Camp 2018 now open to SUISA members

International teamwork during the Schedler Music Songwriter Camp 2016: Luca Hänni, from Berne (in the background, on the right) composed a song together with Dillon Dixon, from the USA (left) and Erik Wigelius, from Sweden. (Photo: Ratko Photography)

At the “Pop & Schlager Songwriter Camp” by Schedler Music, songwriters from more than seven countries, in teams of three, compose potential hits of tomorrow under the motto “It’s all about the song” over a period of five days. A total of 35 national and...read more