Tag Archives: Licensing agreement

SUISA extends payment deadline for its customers

From April 2020 and until further notice, SUISA will grant an extension of the payment period on invoices issued. For music not used in connection with the official regulations against the spread of the corona pandemic, copyright fees will be dropped. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold

SUISA extends payment deadline for its customers

The corona virus is currently posing major challenges for the whole of Switzerland – many of SUISA’s customers are affected by the financial consequences, as are the musicians whose rights SUISA manages. (Photo: Federal Office of Public Health)

The drastic measures taken to contain the Sars CoV-2 virus have brought about drastic changes in the social and economic environment in Switzerland within a very short time. Cultural life in the country has almost come to a standstill. Many of SUISA’s customers, especially event organisers and commercial enterprises, are suffering from the financial consequences of the lockdown. SUISA members are also severely affected by the sudden loss of basic income: Copyright royalties are one of the few steady sources of income for composers, lyricists and publishers whose rights SUISA manages.

SUISA is a link in the chain of companies affected by the crisis: Especially now, it is of existential interest for music creators that the payment of copyright royalties is preserved. In this context, SUISA is maintaining its service of permitting public use of music and is adapting some of its modalities to exceptional circumstances for the benefit of licensees.

Extension of the payment deadlines

For invoices issued from April 2020, the payment period for SUISA’s customers will be increased. The extended term of payment is recorded as a date on the invoices. This accommodation in the terms of payment is granted automatically and will be valid until further notice.

Discount for music usages that did not take place

Due to official regulations, various uses of music are and have been impossible. Be it banned events, closed shops or events in hospitality businesses that could inevitably not take place: Copyright fees for usages that have demonstrably not taken place shall not be payable.

In order to be able to deduct the discount correctly according to each individual case, various procedures will be applied for administrative and technical reasons:

Dance and entertainment in the hospitality industry

Customers who obtain a licence for dance and entertainment in the hotel and restaurant industry according to the Common Tariff H (CT H) can partially benefit from an automatic and deduction of the discount. For all cases where an automatic reduction is not possible due to the data available, we will dispatch the annual invoices in the regular scope. If the invoiced amount is too high due to cancelled events, we will revoke the invoices and reduce them to the actual amount of use according to the feedback from the customers.

Background entertainment

For licensees of the Common Tariff 3a (CT 3a) for background entertainment, the dates of business closures can vary considerably from one company to another.

We kindly ask you to notify us of the respective business closure dates by using our electronic form:

  • For your notification, please use the form located at www.suisa.ch/3a
  • Please note that reimbursements can only be made if no employees were on the business premises and if there were no occurrences of music use in telephone loops or in business vehicles.

Once we have verified the details you submitted, we are going to credit the relevant amounts in line with Common Tariff 3a for full calendar months where no background entertainment took place. For businesses which were open again on 27 April and would not fulfil these requirements, SUISA is offering a reduction of one calendar month as a gesture of goodwill.

Customers of other tariffs

Licensees of other tariffs who receive periodic invoices for long-term contracts must report any music use that has not taken place to the competent SUISA administration department, whose contact details appear on the invoices. Thus, in the context of a final settlement, the compensation can be adjusted to the actual use made.

SUISA remains available to answer questions or concerns of all customers by telephone from Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and from 1.30 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Further information:
www.suisa.ch/3a
www.suisa.ch

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From April 2020 and until further notice, SUISA will grant an extension of the payment period on invoices issued. For music not used in connection with the official regulations against the spread of the corona pandemic, copyright fees will be dropped. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold

SUISA extends payment deadline for its customers

The corona virus is currently posing major challenges for the whole of Switzerland – many of SUISA’s customers are affected by the financial consequences, as are the musicians whose rights SUISA manages. (Photo: Federal Office of Public Health)

The drastic measures taken to contain the Sars CoV-2 virus have brought about drastic changes in the social and economic environment in Switzerland within a very short time. Cultural life in the country has almost come to a standstill. Many of SUISA’s customers, especially event organisers and commercial enterprises,...read more

Penny-pinching in digital music distribution

Business in the online sector has been subject to constant change – not only for copyright societies. In the second part of the interview, SUISA CEO Andreas Wegelin reports on the status quo and provides an outlook on the scenarios that are being discussed. Interview by guest author Silvano Cerutti

Penny-pinching in digital music distribution

Music is now consumed rather differently to how it was consumed 15 years ago: From the turnover of the Digital Service Providers, about 12 to 15 percent are allocated to authors, which results in royalties at a micro-penny -level per play. (Photo: LikeBerry)

Andreas Wegelin, let’s talk about proportions and size ratios. Streaming service providers such as Spotify, for example, pay composers micro-penny -amounts per play. If you extrapolate this, what is the percentage of the turnover?
Andreas Wegelin: If you only consider authors’ rights, that is about 12 to 15 percent of about 70% of the service provider’s total turnover. The rest is allocated to the recording, the producer, the artist. This roughly corresponds to the offline situation in Switzerland. Copyright for authors is governed by state-approved tariffs there. They are actually slightly lower. A monopoly thus does not bring about a better result for authors.

Why is there so little that comes together for the author? Without the author, the piece would not even exist for others to perform.
I completely agree with you. If a composer happens to be a good singer as well and thus performs his own songs, he gets more. But this is the same case for the offline sector. A singing author gets more from his record company than from us – because the producer provides the service provider with the music recording which can be played. It is not SUISA that does that but companies such as Sony, Universal etc. which therefore also hold the relevant market power.
Furthermore: Let’s compare the situation to the radio broadcasters: Radio addresses a multitude of listeners, streams one individual listener. If you break down the radio remuneration to listener levels, the amount is not much higher than that for streaming. A reason why streaming is even lower is that I nearly only have mainstream music on the radio. The selection of songs is therefore limited. In the case of streaming services, I also have niche repertoire. In other words (please don’t quote me on the figures), I have a “heavy rotation” on the radio with about 50 songs per month, and 1,000 songs on Spotify.

Can I assume that a service such as YouTube pays out to a similar extent as Spotify?
In the case of YouTube, one question needs to be asked which is difficult to answer: What do the 12 to 15 percent relate to? Spotify has subscription fees while YouTube only has advertising income: Is it thus 12 to 15% of the advertising revenue which has been generated in a specific country for a specific video during a specific period of time? And if there is no advertising shown on the video, is there no money, irrespective of how many thousands of clicks are shown in total?

With YouTube, you have the additional problem that everyone can upload everything without having to supply any rights information. How can you find out what belongs to whom?
YouTube’s approach is automation. This works to some extent, but there are also blatant mistakes with regards to the allocations. For such data volumes, however, it is only possible to do so by way of automation. For a total control, you would have to be able to track all sound files.

Does this mean, the future must be the upload filter?
There’s a huge debate on this topic at EU level. So far, the “safe harbor” principle has been applied in the EU, which said: A Digital Service Provider (DSP) is not responsible for the contents which are uploaded to their platforms. The regulation stems from 2002 and was intended to promote the development of the online data exchange. YouTube did not exist in those days. YouTube could then benefit from this regulation even though masses of protected contents are distributed via YouTube. In the meantime, the protection of the author has been enjoying greater importance again. YouTube, however, threatens now to block contents arguing it would be too complicated to provide for a settlement of the rights in each case. That way, certain contents would no longer be available and this would be a grave restriction of freedom of opinion.

Are there any alternatives?
You could introduce a statutory compensation claim for authors, similar to blank media levies for private copies. This would mean: YouTube is allowed to distribute contents but YouTube would have to pay for it by law. In the case of the blank media levy, the argumentation used to be: You cannot control what someone records onto a music cassette, so a blanket solution is required and it could be that you pay a remuneration of e.g. 5 Rappen for each blank medium per hour in favour of the authors. Something like this would also be possible for online usages but it is a topic that is highly controversial.

Which solution would be better for the authors?
For authors of our scale, a blanket arrangement would be better, for bigger rights holders, the right of interdiction currently in force would be better. It gives them enough power to negotiate with YouTube or Google directly. Google cannot just ignore them. We, however, had to first become active ourselves in order to speak with YouTube about a licence. That was also a reason for our Joint Venture and our approach to expand the repertoire we represent.

How long does it take to negotiate an agreement with a platform of such a magnitude?
Since we have been part of the Joint License and have been processing via Mint, we could shorten the duration. Depending on the provider, it lasts between one and eight months. And if you want to renew an agreement, you are looking at four to five months.

What kind of strategy does SUISA pursue in cases where agreement negotiations with a provider fail?
In such a case – it is rather rare, because, among reasonable business partners, you do find a solution – we must fight in court to get the recognition and the adequate remuneration for the use of the rights of our members.

How many DSPs are there in total?
Actually, there are too many (laughs). There are dozens. Of course, you start with the most important ones, i.e. the biggest. There are about 15. But Mint is planning to expand into other territories. In India, for example, the two big telecoms companies are also important music providers which results in new and different constellations.

I am a cooperative member of SUISA, may I see such agreements?
No. A provider wants to prevent competitors seeing their contracts. That is why there is always a confidentiality clause. SUISA cooperative members do, however, see what they get in the end. If they do not like this situation, they can always assign their rights to someone else. I doubt very much that they will be given access to such contracts there. That is a result of the competitive market.

In December 2019, it became known that Gema has bought a majority stake in Zebralution GmbH, a digital distributor. What does this development mean for SUISA?
Gema tries this way to be increasingly active in the business with data for the works of its members. By cooperating with a digital distributor, Gema can succeed in providing its members with 360-degree-service, which does not just include the management of copyright but also neighbouring rights. SUISA is also going to consider what kind of steps are sensible for a rather comprehensive service to its members in the digital music distribution sector.

Züri West has earned money with “I schänke dir mis Härz”, whereas “079” by Lo & Leduc has yielded much less, even though it is at least as successful.
That may well be the case. This difference does not just apply to Lo & Leduc but for all, worldwide, because music consumption is different to what it was 15 years ago. That is why concerts have become more important and that is why the entire broadcasting sector is so important because we still have relatively stable conditions there …

But?
The problem is that more and more advertising is moving towards the internet. Licensing fees for broadcasting rights depend on the turnover of the broadcaster, and that turnover mainly comes from advertising. The income is falling drastically because advertising is shifting more and more towards the internet.

A similar scenario as we had it in the newspaper sector.
Exactly. This is hard to manage. The next online agreements will need to focus more on that. It is actually very fascinating. And of course we do not always succeed immediately, sometimes it takes tough negotiations and, if necessary, even legal proceedings. We also had this situation in the 70ies and 80ies when the task at hand was to collect remuneration for cable retransmission. New developments and types of services for music keep popping up. We need to keep an eye on them and it is our exciting and rewarding task to negotiate remunerations on behalf of our members.

To the first part of the interview: “Brave new world”

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  1. Rolf Hug says:

    Very interesting. Also to mention that the big publishing companies don’t play by the code of conduct and
    can get away with anything.

Leave a Reply

All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

Your email address will not be published.

Business in the online sector has been subject to constant change – not only for copyright societies. In the second part of the interview, SUISA CEO Andreas Wegelin reports on the status quo and provides an outlook on the scenarios that are being discussed. Interview by guest author Silvano Cerutti

Penny-pinching in digital music distribution

Music is now consumed rather differently to how it was consumed 15 years ago: From the turnover of the Digital Service Providers, about 12 to 15 percent are allocated to authors, which results in royalties at a micro-penny -level per play. (Photo: LikeBerry)

Andreas Wegelin, let’s talk about proportions and size ratios. Streaming service providers such as Spotify, for example, pay composers micro-penny -amounts per play. If you extrapolate this, what is the percentage of the turnover?
Andreas Wegelin: If you only consider authors’...read more

Blockchain – an ending or future for collective management organisations?

Dear members, everyone in the music industry is talking about “Blockchain” at the moment. But it’s not easy to find anyone who can explain in simple terms what it’s all about … By Vincent Salvadé, Deputy CEO

Blockchain - an ending or future for collective management organisations?

British singer songwriter Imogen Heap is said to be the pioneer in the practical application of Blockchain technology for music distribution: Since October 2015, her single “Tiny Human” can be purchased and licensed online via the platform Ujomusic. The payment of the parties involved is based on pre-defined distribution rules via crypto currency. (Photo: Screenshot ujomusic.com)

Blockchain is a technology, a database, a register. It enables the secure exchange of information in a network which is based on the contribution of qualified participants (miners) who check the validity of the transaction by means of the processing power of their computers. All transactions are grouped into blocks which are linked with one another and each participant can check whether the validation operation is correct. This is also how Bitcoin works.

You haven’t quite grasped all of the above? Me neither. It appears, however, that this technology which is based on “smart contracts” gets away without intermediaries: The composer could therefore be paid for concert tickets or music streaming directly. There is even word in the street that this could be the end of collective management organisations.

“Collective management of rights is more than just pure technology. It is based on an important value: a joint defence of creative work.”

Same old story: Since online music emerged about 20 years ago, people predicted that the internet would free authors and help them to become independent of intermediaries. Well, collective management organisations are still here and they constitute an indispensable counterweight to internet giants.

Collective management of rights is, after all, more than just pure technology. It is based on an important value: a joint defence of creative work. Authors will always need an organisation which supports them, which negotiates contracts for them (including smart contracts) and campaign for fair transaction conditions (even if they have been certified by the Blockchain).

But hold on a minute: This statement does not allow us to rest on our laurels. It’s the duty of collective management organisations to be interested in the Blockchain, to understand it and to try and use it for the utmost advantage of authors and publishers.

“Collective management organisations hold essential information which ensures that the remuneration is transferred to the right persons.”

SUISA collaborates with its sister societies to achieve this aim – in Switzerland and abroad. This technology could, after all, be instrumental in avoiding conflicts among rights holders with respect to a work or regarding their due remuneration.

Collective management organisations hold essential information which ensures that the remuneration is transferred to the right persons, and they also possess powerful IT instruments. So how would it be possible that they’re skipped in the transaction validation process?

One thing is for sure: You must not leave the technology companies alone to deal with these questions. Otherwise the Blockchain would become a blocking chain – at the detriment of creative work!

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Dear members, everyone in the music industry is talking about “Blockchain” at the moment. But it’s not easy to find anyone who can explain in simple terms what it’s all about … By Vincent Salvadé, Deputy CEO

Blockchain - an ending or future for collective management organisations?

British singer songwriter Imogen Heap is said to be the pioneer in the practical application of Blockchain technology for music distribution: Since October 2015, her single “Tiny Human” can be purchased and licensed online via the platform Ujomusic. The payment of the parties involved is based on pre-defined distribution rules via crypto currency. (Photo: Screenshot ujomusic.com)

Blockchain is a technology, a database, a register. It enables the secure exchange of information in a network which is based on the contribution of qualified participants (miners) who check the validity of the transaction by means of the processing...read more

The beats from others – but your own songs

The melody is a catchy tune but the groove just doesn’t match. For days, you haven’t got rhythm while some ingenious lyrics are on the tip of your tongue. There are many reasons why creators use someone else’s raw material for their own songs. The following legal and practical tips on how to deal with bought-out beats help you keep in sync with formalities. Text by Martin Korrodi and Claudia Kempf

The beats from others – but your own songs

Those who produce their own songs with bought-out beats have to familiarise themselves with the licensing terms and conditions of the supplier and to mention the “beat maker” on the works registration at SUISA. (Photo: PrinceOfLove / Shutterstock.com)

Producing new works using pre-existing creations is probably one of the oldest and most successful cultural techniques in existence. Due to the technical developments, the integration of “third-party” beats into your own songs becomes simpler every day, and is thus widespread – especially in the genres of hip-hop and rap.

Raw material for the song production

Under the term “Sampling”, this practice has been in place for several decades. Whereas, in the case of sampling, elements are taken from market-ripe productions and processed further, a multitude of platforms nowadays offer a huge range of beats which are produced specially as raw material for “building” your own songs.

When implementing such pre-fabricated elements it is vital to observe that you don’t just have to “buy” the recording but also acquire the legal authorisations in order to use the recording and the underlying composition for your own works. What the purchaser may do with the acquired beat is set out in so-called licensing terms and conditions. Such “small print” may, for example, carry different names on the websites of the suppliers, such as “license agreement”, “terms of use”, “licensing contract” or “legal matters”.

Watch out for the small print!

Customers usually assume that they may do anything they like with the acquired material as soon as they have purchased the respective beat. This process is, however, usually not a typical purchase agreement but a licensing agreement which often contains limiting terms and conditions and may therefore prevent the registration and exploitation of the finished song.

Under a purchase agreement, the title to a specific work copy is acquired (e.g. on a CD). In this process the buyer has, however, not acquired any rights in the works (compositions) and performances (recordings) which are included on the CD.

Especially when working with pre-fabricated beats, buyers must be clear which copyright-relevant actions are permitted with regards to the beats and which ones are not (reproduction, arrangement etc.) This also applies if you obtain the beats free of charge.

Check list: Check these 9 items first before buying the beats

The following overview collates the most important items that you ought to observe from a legal perspective when acquiring beats via the internet:

  • The licensing terms and conditions (license agreement, terms and conditions, etc.) must always be examined thoroughly! In the case of uncertainties, it is imperative that you consult with the supplier or with SUISA before you complete the purchase transaction.
  • Certain offers only allow the non-commercial exploitation: In such cases, neither the sale of the song (via digital or physical media), nor TV or radio plays are permitted. As a consequence, a monetisation via Youtube is not allowed either.
  • The licence often only covers a specific number of copies of the finished song (e.g. “up to 3,000 units”). If this number is exceeded, a new licence has to be acquired, depending on the respective provisions, or a share in the collected revenue for the exploitation has to be paid to the beat maker.
  • Some licensing models explicitly provide for an exclusion of specific exploitations (e.g. “TV/Radio plays not included”).
  • The producers of the beats are often members of a collective management organisation themselves and demand that they participate with a certain percentage as co-authors when the finished songs are registered.
  • In nearly all cases, the name of the beat maker has to be mentioned when the finished song is used in line with the beat maker’s stipulations (Credits).
  • In the case of non-exclusive licences it is imperative to observe that other customers may also use the same material for their songs.
  • It is often possible to acquire the material on an exclusive basis if you pay a higher fee. In such cases, the respective beat will be deleted from the store once the purchase process has been completed and is thus no longer available to any other customers. In the case of exclusive deals, all necessary authorisations are usually granted in order to be able to exploit the finished song without any limitations.
  • Guarantee and indemnity: Customers who invest a lot of time and money also want to be sure that the finished production is free from third-party claims. In the licensing terms and conditions, the beat maker should therefore issue a guarantee to this end and indemnify customers from any third-party claims.

Registration of the finished songs with SUISA

Due to the rights administration agreement, SUISA has the duty to license the works of its members vis-a-vis the customers. The rights administration agreement applies consistently to all works of a member – it is usually not possible for SUISA to take limitations for a specific song contained in the licensing agreement with the beat maker into consideration.

In particular, SUISA shall not monitor the number of licensed copies or exempt specific exploitations of a song from its licensing activities. As a consequence, SUISA cannot accept any work registrations which contain beats whose use is only permitted subject to restricted conditions.

Mention the beat maker in the work registration

The work registration must be in line with the contents of the licensing agreement. As a consequence, the shares for the exploitation of the beats must be clearly stipulated in the agreement or in the terms and conditions of business. If the shares are not clearly specified, and this does, unfortunately, sometimes happen, they have to be clarified with the supplier.

The following provisions can often be found:

  1. The beat maker must receive a specific percentage of the collected income for the exploitation. In the work registration, the beat maker must be mentioned as a composer with this very percentage.
  2. The beat maker will not receive a share but demands “Credits”; his/her name therefore has to be mentioned. In the work registration, the beat maker must be mentioned as a composer with a 0% share.
  3. The beat maker neither asks for a share nor for “Credits”. The beat maker must still be mentioned as a composer with a 0% share. If the name of the composer is not known, “unknown” may be entered in the composer field.

Independently of the licensing provision, the beat maker must therefore always be mentioned in the work registration. On top of that, a note needs to be made in the comments field when registering the work that it contains a purchased beat. Moreover, it is mandatory to provide a copy of the licensing agreement.

The following shall also apply here: If works are created where several authors have contributed, the shares and authorisations must be clearly specified prior to publication.

Purchase via the internet
The purchase of beats via the internet from an unknown supplier holds the same risks as any other purchase on the internet. The government has therefore issued some basic guidelines which should be observed when making purchases on the internet.
Jamahook – a social network for musicians
A portal by musicians for musicians is currently in its infancy, which shall facilitate the collaboration between musicians, beat makers and producers. The core piece of this platform is a sophisticated algorithm which allows to find suitable sounds or beats matching your own music – in an instant. The search includes harmonies, rhythms, tempo and timbre. Jamahook does not just simplify the musical collaboration but also the regulation of copyright-related legal aspects. In this context, SUISA supports the makers of this platform which has its registered office in Switzerland. More info on this project: www.jamahook.com as well as www.youtube.com/jamahook
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The melody is a catchy tune but the groove just doesn’t match. For days, you haven’t got rhythm while some ingenious lyrics are on the tip of your tongue. There are many reasons why creators use someone else’s raw material for their own songs. The following legal and practical tips on how to deal with bought-out beats help you keep in sync with formalities. Text by Martin Korrodi and Claudia Kempf

The beats from others – but your own songs

Those who produce their own songs with bought-out beats have to familiarise themselves with the licensing terms and conditions of the supplier and to mention the “beat maker” on the works registration at SUISA. (Photo: PrinceOfLove / Shutterstock.com)

Producing new works using pre-existing creations is probably one of the oldest and most successful cultural techniques in existence. Due to the technical developments,...read more

Questions and answers on the licensing agreement between SUISA and Youtube

On 25 September 2013, SUISA and YouTube have announced the signature of a licensing agreement. Here are some Q&As regarding the SUISA/Youtube deal.

Questions and answers on the licensing agreement between SUISA and YouTube

SUISA/Youtube deal: Remuneration for the creative work of Swiss music authors on the biggest online video platform in the world. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

Why have SUISA and YouTube entered into a licensing agreement?
SUISA represents the copyright of many musical composers and lyricists from all over the world. On behalf of all of these composers and authors, SUISA is making sure that a remuneration is paid whenever their music is played, broadcast or performed in Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Playing, broadcasting and copying music is also referred to as music usage.

Most videos on YouTube can be viewed by any interested person at any time and from anywhere. In other words: YouTube makes the videos available for a usage outside your domestic and private circle. The website operator, YouTube, requires a permission from the authors in order to make videos available irrespective of time and place.

As it happens, many videos shown on YouTube contain music or are actually music videos. For music usage outside people’s domestic and private circle, music authors are entitled to receive a remuneration from the website operator. As YouTube is making money with its video platform by means of advertising, for example, this is even more pertinent. The more a YouTube website is retrieved the more money YouTube can make by means of advertising.

In order for internet user to watch videos on YouTube often and for long periods of time, the website needs entertaining contents. One component of the contents is the music in videos. A lot of music in the videos on YouTube stems from composers and lyricists whose copyright SUISA manages in Switzerland.

The agreement between SUISA and YouTube mainly governs that the authors represented by SUISA receive a remuneration for the usage of their music on YouTube.ch. In return, YouTube receives the permission, i.e. licence to make their music contained in the respective videos available.

How did the agreement with YouTube come about?
SUISA is glad to have reached an agreement with YouTube in the interest of its members after lengthy negotiations. Besides SUISA, YouTube has concluded contracts with major collective management organisations in Europe such as PRS for Music (Great Britain), SACEM (France), SGAE (Spain) and SIAE (Italy).

How much money does YouTube pay to SUISA per ‘click’ on a video?
There are several reasons the licence fee amounts cannot be revealed. On the one hand, SUISA is bound to a contractual non-disclosure agreement. On the other hand – that much can be revealed – the total amount of the paid licence fees depends on the turnover YouTube generates. The video platform mainly generates income via advertising.

As announced in the press release, the agreement enters into force from 01 September 2013. It therefore only covers videos that were accessed (or clicked on) after that date. YouTube is going to regularly provide SUISA with statistics on the used videos in future. The usage statistics show which works have actually been used and how often they were used. Based on these details, the remuneration share per individual work will be calculated.

As soon as the first statistics provided by YouTube have reached us, we can execute this calculation for the first time. After that, SUISA will pass on the money collected from YouTube to the authors of the respective works. SUISA is planning to distribute the royalties on a biannual basis.

How does the agreement influence the availability of YouTube videos in Switzerland?
Subject to the agreement, SUISA can only grant such usage rights which it is actually entitled to manage. SUISA does not represent the entire scope of copyright of each and every author in the world. Rights not managed by SUISA are therefore not covered by the agreement in question. SUISA has no influence how the copyright not covered by the agreement for YouTube is managed.

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  1. Angelis Z. says:

    Guten Tag
    Eine Frage zu den Gebühren. Wir betreiben ein Studio Gymastik (Pilates, Zumba usw… und lassen dabei Musik laufen. Wie sieht die Rechtslage aus, wenn wir einen Spotify Account oder einen Youtube Pro accout besitzen (monatliche Gebühren), müssen wir trotzdem Suisa bezahlen? Vielen Dank für eure Antworten und Klarstellung.
    Lieben Gruss
    Angelis

    • Lieber Angelis
      Ja, auch beim Abspielen von Musik mittels Streaming muss eine Vergütung für die Urheberrechte bezahlt werden. Mit dem Betrag, welcher Ihnen von Spotify oder Youtube Pro in Rechnung gestellt wird, bezahlen Sie die Dienstleistung des Streaming-Anbieters, welcher Ihnen die Musik zum Abspielen zur Verfügung stellt – was Sie früher für den Kauf einer CD bezahlt haben, zahlen Sie heute im Rahmen Ihres Streaming-Abos. Da Sie die Musik in Ihrem Gymnastik-Studio und somit ausserhalb der Privatsphäre verwenden, benötigen Sie zusätzlich eine Erlaubnis für die öffentliche Wiedergabe der gestreamten Musik. Deshalb stellt Ihnen die SUISA eine Vergütung für die Urheberrechte in Rechnung und leitet das Geld an die Künstlerinnen und Künstler weiter.
      Freundliche Grüsse
      Martin Korrodi, SUISA, Abteilungsleiter Lizenzierung Aufführung

  2. Meltzer says:

    Liebe Suisa,

    darf man Filme von Youtube, die im Handel nicht erhältlich sind, auch in einer Schule für den Unterricht verwenden)
    Filme (DVDs und CDs) dürfen ja auschnittsweise vervielfältigt und auf einer Schulinternen Plattform zur Verfügung gestellt werden.

    Wie sieht es jedoch mit Filmen von Youtube aus?

    Herzlichen Dank
    Freundliche Grüsse

    Pascal

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Lieber Pascal

      Im Rahmen des gesetzlich erlaubten Schulgebrauchs ist grundsätzlich jede auszugsweise Werkverwendung – und somit auch das Bereitstellen von Auszügen von Youtube-Videos auf einer schulinternen Plattform – erlaubt (vgl. Art. 19 Abs. 1 lit. b & Abs. 3 lit a). Ausschlaggebend ist dabei, dass die schulinterne Plattform ausschliesslich von der Schüler- und Lehrerschaft benutzt werden kann und dass die Schule eine Vergütung gemäss dem Gemeinsamen Tarif 7 an die Pro Litteris bezahlt.

      Viele Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger / SUISA Kommunikation

  3. Daniel says:

    Vielleicht eine dumme Frage:
    Aus nicht Musikersicht heisst das wenn ich zB eine kleine Bar betreibe und Musik ausschliesslich von Youtube abspiele müsste ich keine separaten SUISA-Beiträge bezahlen.
    Bei einem DJ wäre dies anders. Ist dies so richtig ?

    • Nein, dem ist nicht so. Jede Verwendung von Musik zur Unterhaltung der Gäste in einer öffentlich zugänglichen Bar ist vergütungspflichtig, egal aus welcher Quelle die Musik stammt. Denn YouTube erwirbt im Vertrag mit der SUISA nur das Recht, Werke aus dem Repertoire der SUISA auf der Videoplattform zugänglich zu machen. Weitere urheberrechtlich relevante Nutzungen, wie etwa das öffentliche Abspielen von Videos, werden von diesem Vertrag nicht erfasst. Wenn also YouTube-Videos in einer Bar als Quelle für Hintergrundmusik verwendet werden, hat der Betreiber der Bar eine entsprechende Erlaubnis bei der SUISA einzuholen. In diesem Fall richtet sich die Urheberechtsentschädigung für die Hintergrundmusik nach dem gemeinsamen Tarif 3a (GT 3a). Somit sind sowohl das öffentliche Abspielen von YouTube-Videos wie auch die Musiknutzung an einem DJ-Event durch die SUISA zu lizenzieren. Der Unterschied liegt darin, dass beim DJ-Event ein anderer Tarif zur Anwendung kommt, da es sich hier nicht um Hintergrundmusik handelt, sondern um Musik zu Tanz und Unterhaltung (GT H).
      Martin Korrodi, Abteilungsleiter Aufführungsrechte, SUISA

  4. Daniel says:

    Also, verstehe ich das richtig:

    Wenn ich als Musiker z.B. für mein Portfolio ein Video mit einem Cover eines Songs (von mir gespielt/gesungen) auf Youtube hochlade, muss ich mich nur noch um die Synchronisationsrechte kümmern? Die Urheberrechte, welche über die SUISA abgerechnet werden, sind somit per Pauschalvertrag bereits geregelt?

    Vielen Dank für eine kurze Rückmeldung.

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Durch den Vertrag zwischen SUISA und Youtube wird grundsätzlich das Zugänglichmachen auf der Plattform Youtube für die Urheber abgegolten. Darin nicht eingeschlossen sind jedoch die nötigen Vervielfältigungsrechte am musikalischen Werk für die Herstellung des Films, welche gemäss Tarif VN der SUISA lizenziert werden. Die Synchronisationsrechte müssen separat bei den jeweiligen Rechteinhabern (Urheber/Verlag) bezogen werden. Zudem stellt sich bei Coversongs die Frage, ob es sich tatsächlich um ein Cover oder um eine Bearbeitung handelt. Diesbezüglich sollte Folgendes beachtet werden: Das blosse Spielen von akkustischen Akkorden mit Verzierungen zur originalen Gesangslinie stellt noch keine Bearbeitung dar, sondern gilt in der Regel als «Cover». Sobald Sie aber die Gesangslinie und Akkordprogressionen abändern, befinden Sie sich im Bereich der «Bearbeitung». Damit eine Bearbeitung überhaupt veröffentlicht bzw. öffentlich genutzt werden darf, muss immer zuerst eine Bearbeitungserlaubnis beim Verlag oder, wenn das Originalstück nicht verlegt ist, beim Urheber eingeholt werden. Bearbeitungen sind urheberrechtlich selbstständig geschützt, wenn eine Bearbeitungserlaubnis vorliegt.
      Manu Leuenberger / SUISA Kommunikation

  5. Christian Pastor says:

    Liebes Suisa Team,

    was muss ich denn tun, wenn jemand meine Texte ohne mein Wissen nutzt und auf You Tube veröffentlicht?

  6. Christian says:

    Ich nehme ein Beispiel, um Fragen zu stellen:
    Mein Chor bringt einen CD heraus. Teile dieses CD ist in einem Video gebraucht und dieses Video geht auf Internet:
    – Wie ist meine Musik bei Youtube erkannt, wenn niemand sagt, dass meine Musik gebraucht wurde (Audio Vergleich ?)
    – Wenn ich das Video lege, wie kann ich machen (z.B. Musik ID geben), dass die Musik meines Video bei Youtube richtig erkannt wird?
    – Wer bekommt dann die Gebühren : Der Komponist ? Der Chor ? Editor/CD Hersteller ?

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Lieber Christian

      Vielen Dank für Deine Fragen. Zu Deinem geschilderten Beispiel können wir Folgendes sagen:

      – Grundsätzlich hat bei einer Nutzung sowohl der Urheber (Komponist) als auch der Chor (Interpret) und der Produzent (CD-Herausgeber, Plattenfirma) eine Vergütung zugut. Die SUISA ist nur für die Vergütung der Urheber, also der Komponisten und Textautoren zuständig. Die Leistungsschutzrechte, also die Rechte der Interpreten und Produzenten, werden nicht über die SUISA abgegolten.
      – YouTube verfügt über eine Fingerprint-Software, die Musik in Videos automatisch erkennen soll. Dieses System heisst bei YouTube «Content-ID». Du findest darüber Informationen auf den Hilfeseiten von YouTube.
      – Nur die Rechteinhaber der Aufnahme können eine Audio-Referenzdatei in das Content-ID-System hochladen. Den Zugang zum Content-ID-System vergibt YouTube selektiv. Das heisst: Zum Beispiel haben viele Plattenfirmen Berechtigung, etwas hochzuladen, weil sie eben in der Regel die Rechte an den Aufnahmen besitzen. Ansonsten habe auch einige Digitale Musik-Distributoren Zugang zum Content-ID-System. Solche Distributoren findest Du im Internet, indem Du z.B. nach den Stichworten «online music distribution» (oder ähnlich) suchst.
      – Wenn die Aufnahme vom Content-ID-System von YouTube richtig identifiziert werden konnte und YouTube mit dem Video, in dem die Musik enthalten ist, (Werbe-)Umsatz erzielt, zahlt YouTube einen Anteil des Umsatzes als Vergütung aus sowohl an die Urheber (über die SUISA) als auch an die Interpreten und die Produzenten (nicht über die SUISA).

      Wir hoffen, Dir mit diesen Infos etwas weitergeholfen zu haben, und wünschen Dir viel Erfolg mit Deinem Chor.

      Viele Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger / Kommunikation SUISA

  7. Linus says:

    Guten Tag
    Verstehe ich das richtig, für unsere Inhalte, die ausserhalb der Schweiz abgespielt werden, erhalten wir nichts?
    Oder habe ich das falsch verstanden?
    Freundliche Grüsse
    Linus

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Lieber Linus
      Zuerst einmal bitten wir für unsere verspätete Antwort um Entschuldigung.
      Zu Deiner Frage: Durch den Vertrag mit Youtube ist das Repertoire der SUISA-Mitglieder für die Nutzung auf der Video-Plattform in einer Vielzahl von Ländern lizenziert (siehe dazu auch unsere Medienmitteilung zum Vertragsabschluss vom 25.9.2013: http://www.suisa.ch/de/news/news-archiv/news/article/2013/09/25/suisa-und-youtube-einigen-sich-auf-lizenzvertrag/). Konkret gilt der Vertrag neben Nutzer-Zugriffen von Schweizer IP-Adressen auch für Zugriffe u.a. aus dem Gebiet der EU, EFTA, EWR und weiteren Ländern ausserhalb der Schweiz. Für Nutzungen in diesen vertraglich vereinbarten Ländern werden allfällige Vergütungen von Youtube direkt an die SUISA ausbezahlt und von uns an die Rechteinhaber weitergeleitet.
      Nochmals sorry für die späte Antwort und viele Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger / Kommunikation SUISA

  8. Marc says:

    Grundsätzlich ist der Vertragsabschluss mit YouTube positiv… aber leider auch sehr intransparent.

    Mich würde interessieren, wie die SUISA den Datenabgleich vornimmt. Wie erkennt die SUISA dass eines der Werke der SUISA Mitglieder z.B. in einem DJ Set Standbild Video vorkommt?

    Vermutlich gar nicht, da YouTube keine Daten über den Inhalt erfassen lässt. Somit kann auch nicht abgerechnet werden. Bei den Werken welche selber hochgeladen werden kann auch keine Mitglieder Nr. hinterlegt werden.

    Wo ist die Magie, welche aus dem YouTube Video Namen den Link zu uns Mitglieder herstellt?

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Lieber Marc

      Danke für deinen Kommentar.

      Zu deiner Frage zum Datenabgleich: YouTube stellt uns Nutzungsmeldungen zu. Anhand dieser Nutzungsmeldungen identifizieren wir das von der SUISA vertretene Repertoire. Die Meldungen enthalten Werk-/Songtitel, Künstlernamen, Albumtitel plus optionale weitere Angaben wie Labels, ISRC/ISWC-Nr., UPC-Code, sofern diese bekannt sind.

      Nach den ersten Erkenntnissen bestehen die Daten der Nutzungsmeldungen aus Informationen, die YouTube über das Partnerprogramm erhält. Dazu gehört das YouTube-eigene Content-ID-System, das hauptsächlich durch Informationen von Labels gespiesen wird. Bekannt ist auch, dass YouTube über eine Inhaltserkennungsoftware verfügt, die Video- und Audiospuren analysieren kann.

      Die Qualität der Daten von Nutzungsmeldungen ist immer stark vom Kunden abhängig. Es ist auch bei anderen Kunden ein mehr oder weniger langer und ständiger Prozess, die Meldungen so weit wie möglich auf unsere Bedürfnisse hin zu optimieren. Im Fall von YouTube kommt hinzu, dass der Vertrag neu ist. Das Prozedere für das Reporting wird im Moment abgeklärt und befindet sich bis zur ersten Abrechnung (voraussichtlich 2014) in Entwicklung.

      Freundliche Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger / Kommunikation SUISA

      • Marc says:

        Hallo und danke für den Feedback

        Das mit dem YouTube Partnerprogramm und der ContentID ist so ne Sache. Für eine ContentID darf man sich bewerben (meine ist noch unbeantwortet). Eine ContentID zu erhalten ist – so schreibt das YouTube – keine Garantie.

        Wurde von der SUISA sichergestellt dass wir Mitglieder eine ContentID erhalten?

        Falls dem nicht so ist, bitte ich um eine offizielle Information, dass der Vertrag mit YouTube nur von einem selektiven SUISA Mitgliederkreis genutzt werden kann, der gemäss Vertrag natürlich auch geheim ist.

        Gruss
        -Marc

        • Erika Weibel says:

          Lieber Marc
          Selbstverständlich nützt die Vereinbarung mit YouTube nicht nur einem selektiven Kreis von SUISA Mitgliedern, sondern es wird für all unsere Mitglieder lizenziert.
          Zurzeit arbeiten wir an einem YouTube-Ratgeber für unsere Mitglieder. Dort werden wir pragmatisch erläutern, wie sie vorgehen müssen, damit ihre Werke auf YouTube getagged werden können. So können Sie sicherstellen, dass Google uns die kompleten Daten für eine korrekte Abrechnung liefern kann. Den Ratgeber werden wir hier auf dem SUISAblog veröffentlichen. Bis wir alle Erkenntnisse dafür verarbeitet haben, bitten wir um etwas Geduld.
          Freundliche Grüsse
          Erika Weibel / Kommunikation SUISA

  9. Bonjour,
    Une deuxième question pratique se pose. Si nous avons bien compris, SUISA licencie en faveur de YouTube les oeuvres de son répertoire. Cela ne vaut-il que pour le site YouTube.com/ch ou pour YouTube.com en général ?

    Si cela ne vaut que pour YouTube.com/ch, SUISA pourrait-elle renseigner ses membres sur les situations ayant cours à l’étranger et le cas échéant communiquer les éventuelles instructions pour les cas où les membres SUISA doivent prendre des disposition ?

    Mille mercis d’avance et cordiales salutations.

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Cher Eric

      Un point au préalable: le contrat entre SUISA et YouTube est nouveau. Pour le moment, certains points de ce contrat doivent encore être éclaircis. Ces points concernent notamment le reporting. Jusqu’à la prochaine répartition (vraisemblablement en 2014), le procédé est en développement.

      Sous cette réserve, nous pouvons à ce stade donner les renseignements suivants:

      – Concernant votre première question: les listes d’oeuvres de YouTube contiennent le titre de l’oeuvre/de la chanson, de l’artiste, le titre de l’album et des indications optionnelles comme le label, les nos ISRC/ISWC, l’UPC-Code, pour autant que ces données soient connues. Les données proviennent du propre système Content-ID de youtube, principalement alimenté par les informations des labels.

      – Concernant votre deuxième question: le contrat vaut pour les accès à partir d’adresses IP suisses, ainsi que pour les accès à partir notamment du territoire de l’Union européenne, de l’AELE et de la CEE entre autres; les accès à partir des régions de l’Extrême-Orient et de l’Amrérique du Nord et du Sud ne sont pas couverts par le contrat. On peut ainsi dire que le contrat ne s’applique pas de manière générale pour YouTube. Dans le contrat, les utilisations sont réglées d’après le territoire de provenance des accès.

      Meilleures salutations
      Manu Leuenberger / Communication SUISA

    • Manu Leuenberger says:

      Cher Eric
      Merci pour vos deux questions, auxquelles nous allons répondre ces prochains jours.
      En vous remerciant de votre compréhension.
      Manu Leuenberger / Communication SUISA

  10. Bonjour,

    Pouvez-vous nous donner des précisions sur la manière dont les oeuvres seront déclarées par YouTube ? On sait que beaucoup d’internautes postent des vidéos avec du contenu musical mais sans forcément les déclarer. Ainsi YouTube ne devrait pas en avoir connaissance.

    Devrons-nous fournir des indications concernant des utilisations dont nous avons connaissance pour assurer le traitement par SUISA ?

    Mille mercis d’avance et cordiales salutations.

    Eric Mermod – myMusicRights Sàrl

    Extrait de votre article :
    Comme indiqué dans le communiqué de presse le contrat entre en vigueur au 1er septembre 2013. Il ne vaut donc que pour les «clics» effectués à partir de cette date. Désormais, YouTube fournira périodiquement à SUISA des statistiques sur l’utilisation des vidéos. Les statistiques d’utilisation indiquent quelles œuvres ont effectivement été utilisées et combien de fois elles l’ont été. Sur la base de ces indications, on calculera la part de redevances par œuvre.

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On 25 September 2013, SUISA and YouTube have announced the signature of a licensing agreement. Here are some Q&As regarding the SUISA/Youtube deal.

Questions and answers on the licensing agreement between SUISA and YouTube

SUISA/Youtube deal: Remuneration for the creative work of Swiss music authors on the biggest online video platform in the world. (Photo: Manu Leuenberger)

Why have SUISA and YouTube entered into a licensing agreement?
SUISA represents the copyright of many musical composers and lyricists from all over the world. On behalf of all of these composers and authors, SUISA is making sure that a remuneration is paid whenever their music is played, broadcast or performed in Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Playing, broadcasting and copying music is also referred to as music usage.

Most videos on YouTube can be viewed by any interested person at any time and from anywhere. In other words: YouTube makes...read more