Author Archives: Manu Leuenberger

New features in member services of SUISA

SUISA has been enhancing its online service for years now, especially for music authors and music publishers. Self-service is key: It should be easy and comfortable for members to access all SUISA services online. This does not just save time for members: SUISA can thus also increase its efficiency and therefore distribute more money to rightsholders. In 2022, the conditions for membership will also be amended. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold and Claudia Kempf

New features in member services of SUISA

SUISA is constantly enhancing its online services for members and for customers in terms of self-service. (Photo: PopTika / Shutterstock.com)

In June 2021, SUISA set a milestone for its members: Thanks to graphics which are easy to understand, music authors and publishers have a quick overview of the development of their copyright revenues of the last five years now that the Royalty Report has been launched. In addition, the tool lets you run individual analyses with one mouse click.

Self-service: Constant enhancement of online services

SUISA took a major step towards self-service with these new features: Members and customers can access all of the information and services of SUISA relevant to them, as easily as possible via internet. For a few years now, SUISA has been constantly expanding its online services. Authors, publishers but also users of music will be able to use more and more services via web portals – in a simple and comfortable manner. SUISA is going to publish news about the new services via all of its channels.

Members will benefit from this on the one hand: Instead of reverting to time and cost consuming queries via phone, letter or e-mail, they can now access all details on the contractual relationship with SUISA online via their personal login to the membership portal “My account”. SUISA, on the other hand, will also benefit from this by saving time and cost for providing advice via phone, e-mail or letter. This, in turn, is an advantage to the authors and publishers because SUISA will then be in a position to pay out more to its rightsholders thanks to the costs savings made.

New criteria for members who are entitled to vote

The SUISA Board of Directors decided in December 2020 to adapt the criteria for members who are entitled to vote. Authors and publishers will be admitted as members with voting rights if they have been SUISA principals for at least one year and had at least CHF 3,000 in royalties paid out to them since their registration. Previously, this amount was CHF 2,000. This change entered into force in 2021.

Furthermore, the contractual membership relationship will be reverted into a mandate relationship if members received less than CHF 3,000 in distribution payments overall for their works during the last ten years. This amendment shall be made in line with item 5.5.4 of the SUISA Articles of Association:

5.5 Membership shall end:
[…]
5.5.4 if the remuneration distributed to a member over a ten-year period does not reach the threshold set by the Board, and the membership status reverts to a simple mandate relationship; […]

Principals shall be equal to members with voting rights with respect to financial matters. They have, just like the members, the same entitlements to licensing and distribution of the collections for the works which are broadcast, performed, reproduced or used online. They do, however, not have voting rights in the General Meeting of the Cooperative Society.

Changes to the SUISA membership structure

The reason for this change is today’s membership structure of SUISA: At the end of 2020, SUISA had more than 12,000 members entitled to vote and nearly 28,000 principals. Among these 40,000 rightsholders, only about 60% generate income from the exploitation of their works. More than a third of principals and members never receive a distribution at all because their works are neither performed, recorded, broadcast nor used online. Even among the 12,000 rightsholders with voting rights, nearly half has hardly generated any copyright revenues during the last few years.

Even though SUISA is hardly playing a major role for them in terms of income, they were entitled to vote about the future and fate of the Cooperative Society at the SUISA General Meeting. In future it should only be members for whom SUISA is a major source of income who can decide on the topics presented to the SUISA General Meeting.

Members who do not fulfil the conditions mentioned, will revert to principals without a voting right at the General Meeting. Those who are affected will receive a letter in January 2022 where they will be personally informed about this.

Register now for “My account”

Benefit from the online services of SUISA and register for the membership portal “my account”: www.suisa.ch/my-account. All rightsholders, members and principals, can get information regarding their settlements and register their works or launch queries on a 24/7 basis there.

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SUISA has been enhancing its online service for years now, especially for music authors and music publishers. Self-service is key: It should be easy and comfortable for members to access all SUISA services online. This does not just save time for members: SUISA can thus also increase its efficiency and therefore distribute more money to rightsholders. In 2022, the conditions for membership will also be amended. Text by Irène Philipp Ziebold and Claudia Kempf

New features in member services of SUISA

SUISA is constantly enhancing its online services for members and for customers in terms of self-service. (Photo: PopTika / Shutterstock.com)

In June 2021, SUISA set a milestone for its members: Thanks to graphics which are easy to understand, music authors and publishers have a quick overview of the development of their copyright revenues of the last five years now...read more

Residuals from online collections – what’s that and how can I participate in them?

In mid-December, we pay our members the fourth settlement of their online revenues this year. But this time, we’ll put a cherry on top! This “cherry” comes from the so-called “residuals” about the distribution of which the SUISA Board had decided in autumn 2021. In this context, here’s the most important piece of advice: Register all works as soon as possible with SUISA! Text by Anke Link

Residuals from online collections – what’s that and how can I participate in them?

Due to an international agreement with online music platforms, SUISA amended its distribution rules in the online collections area. (Photo: MandriaPix / Shutterstock.com)

“Residuals” are amounts paid by online music platforms for works or parts of works which have not been claimed by any collective management organisation. The reason for this is often that the works or parts of works have not been registered by the authors or publishers with their collective management organisations. SUISA can only collect licence fees via the SUISA Digital Licensing AG (SUDL) from the platform for works that have been declared and completely documented. This is why it is important that you register the works as soon as possible! Best before they are published online (details on this also in the blog article “Online licensing activities require early work registrations” of 29 October 2020).

International rules on how to deal with “residuals”

In the summer of 2020, an international working group, consisting of CMOs (SUISA was also part of it), major publishers and the most important platforms agreed on binding rules regarding how to deal with “residuals”: The money attributable to unclaimed works or parts of works is divided among all licensors of a platform in proportion to their respective market share. SUISA thus receives a share for each territory for which it licenses a platform, according to the importance of its repertoire in relation to the other repertoires used in that country.

This is just one more reason why it is important that works are registered as soon as possible, as this increases SUISA’s repertoire share. What needs to be mentioned in this context is that the members undertake towards SUISA to register their works within a certain period anyway: in the case of authors, this is within a month after the work has been created and in the case of publishers within a month after the work has been published.

It will now also be possible via SUISA Digital Licensing to issue an invoice for this period even after the expiry of an already distributed usage period, and this up to a maximum of 18 months after the end of the usage period. For works which have been fully registered with SUISA within the period, SUDL will be able to request the respective licence fee from the platform.

Only when the period within which a retroactive invoice can be issued, has expired, “residuals” will be determined. This means: The contributions for works or part of works which have, by then, still not been claimed by a collective management organisation, will be paid by the online music platforms to all of its licensors in proportion to their repertoire share.

Changes to the SUISA distribution rules

Up to now, only iTunes had paid “residuals” to SUISA. With the agreement made in the summer of 2020, the large platforms are now following suit. This way, a binding provision became necessary in the distribution rules of SUISA, about which the SUISA Board of Directors decided in September 2021. It will be applied to the fourth online distribution 2021 for the first time.

SUISA distributes its share in the “residuals” as a blanket adjustmenton the current online distributions. In contrast to revenues for works that have not been documented or have been only partially documented, which are used offline (e.g. at concerts), the “residuals” will not be reserved for potential late or subsequent settlements at a later point in time.

The reason for this is, on the one hand the disproportionately high costs which such work-based adjustments would entail. On the other hand, our analyses have shown that the works which only get registered fully after the 18-month period has expired, only have little economic significance. Incidentally, even our sister organisations abroad do not reserve “residuals” from the distribution for longer periods.

Whether we are talking about online or offline uses: A fast work registration is an advantage in any case because it facilitates a quick payment of the licensing revenues. Late work registrations, however, always carry the risk of income losses for the respective rightsholders. Additional costs are also created for SUISA which is a disadvantage for all rightsholders.

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In mid-December, we pay our members the fourth settlement of their online revenues this year. But this time, we’ll put a cherry on top! This “cherry” comes from the so-called “residuals” about the distribution of which the SUISA Board had decided in autumn 2021. In this context, here’s the most important piece of advice: Register all works as soon as possible with SUISA! Text by Anke Link

Residuals from online collections – what’s that and how can I participate in them?

Due to an international agreement with online music platforms, SUISA amended its distribution rules in the online collections area. (Photo: MandriaPix / Shutterstock.com)

“Residuals” are amounts paid by online music platforms for works or parts of works which have not been claimed by any collective management organisation. The reason for this is often that the works or parts of works have not been registered by the...read more

SUISA Board meeting, autumn 2021

The Board of Directors and the Committee for Tariffs and Distribution and the one for Organisation and Communication gathered on 29 and 30 September 2021 for their autumn meetings in Lausanne. Report from the Board of Directors by Andreas Wegelin

SUISA Board meeting, autumn 2021

During its autumn meeting, the SUISA Board of Directors elected Francine Jordi (pictured) into the Board of FONDATION SUISA. (Photo: Thomas Buchwalder)

Fortunately, the epidemiological situation allowed the members of the SUISA Board of Directors and the Executive Committee to meet in person again. Of all people, it was ausgerechnet? Councillor of States, Johanna Gapany, newly elected to the Board at the General Meeting 2021, who was only able to join the meeting of the Committee for Organisation and Communication (O+K) via video link due to her participation in the session of the Federal Councillors in Bern. The SUISA meeting schedule 2022 is going to be adapted with the Council sessions in mind.

Cost unit accounting

The Board of Directors dealt with the results of the cost unit accounting for 2020, like every year in its autumn meeting. Based on the cost unit accounting, it can be determined how high the expenditure for collection and distribution is for each tariff in detail.

It is generally known that SUISA deducts a fixed percentage from the settlements to the rightsholders as a cost contribution for its expenditure related to collection and distribution. This percentage, i.e. 15% for performing and broadcasting rights, is a mixed calculation in relation to the effective costs. For example, collecting licence fees for music usages in the hospitality industry (CT H) or for dance and entertainment (CT Hb) is more costly than the collection from radio stations (Tariff A and CT S).

This cost unit accounting also makes these differences visible, and it can also be shown in a time dimension whether the costs for a specific tariff are showing a downward trend thanks to savings and rationalisation measures. The result of the cost unit accounting 2020 was somewhat clouded by the difficult collection situation due to the pandemic, less income but still costs which could not be reduced to the same extent.

Strategy

Every year in its autumn meeting, the Board of Directors takes a look at the strategy of SUISA. The basis paper for this was created in 2019. It was now time to check whether the defined strategic objectives are still to be weighted equally and can be achieved in a meaningful way.

Due to the pandemic, slight adjustments were made; however, the fundamental strategic stance of “asserting oneself in the face of increasing competition through high yields with high cost-awareness and best service quality” remains the same.

Special meeting to discuss online usages

In relation to the company’s strategy, the Board of Directors is going to meet at the end of November in a special meeting to discuss online usages. One reason for this, among others, is also the five-year anniversary of Mint Digital Services, the Joint Venture with the US-American organisation SESAC.

For this special meeting, the Board of Directors approved an agenda and determined the main issues. The objective is to define the needs and expectations of the SUISA members and satisfy them by way of finding suitable measures at Mint Digital Services and the SUISA group of companies.

Distribution of “residuals”

Changes in the distribution rules normally have to be approved by the Swiss Federal Institute of Intellectual Property (in Switzerland) and the Office for Economic Affairs (in Liechtenstein). The competence in the case of distribution rules for collections for online licensing is different: The management of online rights is not subject to federal supervision. As such, the respective changes to distribution rules exclusively fall under the competence of the Distribution and Works Committee and the SUISA Board of Directors.

As part of this competence, the Board of Directors decided in its meeting on 30 September 2021 that item 5.6.1 of the distribution rules be changed respectively reviewed with regards to the distribution of the “residuals” paid by online platforms. “Residuals” are amounts paid by online music platforms for works or parts of works whose rights owners could not be determined and as such no claims were established by any collective management organisation.

Such difficulties arise in such cases when musical works have not been registered in time. For such cases, online providers pay so-called “residuals” after 18 months to the collective management organisation of the country where the music was used.

A so-called “multi-stage invoicing” has been agreed with the online music providers: The usage data of the distribution period will be matched after 90 and after 180 days again against the works database. During that time, it is possible to submit a late registration of the works resulting in a settlement for the work that has been registered late.

The Board of Directors decided that after 180 days, the payments for non-identified works (the “residuals”) shall be paid out as a supplement on top of the other used works in the corresponding distribution period. The alternative that up to five years after the usage, unidentified works can still be registered has been dismissed by the Board of Directors due to cost reasons. It is therefore important that new titles are registered as soon as possible so that online usages can be distributed as adequately as possible.

Francine Jordi elected to the Pension Board of the FONDATION SUISA

The Board of Directors of SUISA is the election committee of the Board of FONDATION SUISA, the foundation for music promotion of SUISA. In its autumn meeting, the Board elected Francine Jordi as a new Pension Board member.

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The Board of Directors and the Committee for Tariffs and Distribution and the one for Organisation and Communication gathered on 29 and 30 September 2021 for their autumn meetings in Lausanne. Report from the Board of Directors by Andreas Wegelin

SUISA Board meeting, autumn 2021

During its autumn meeting, the SUISA Board of Directors elected Francine Jordi (pictured) into the Board of FONDATION SUISA. (Photo: Thomas Buchwalder)

Fortunately, the epidemiological situation allowed the members of the SUISA Board of Directors and the Executive Committee to meet in person again. Of all people, it was ausgerechnet? Councillor of States, Johanna Gapany, newly elected to the Board at the General Meeting 2021, who was only able to join the meeting of the Committee for Organisation and Communication (O+K) via video link due to her participation in the session of the...read more

An inconspicuous medium which deserves more attention

The Schweizer Musikzeitung is so much more than a mouthpiece for Swiss music associations. It has grown to become an inspiring platform where you can find reports on musical topics across genres, languages and regions. Text by guest author Markus Ganz

Schweizer Musikzeitung: An inconspicuous medium which deserves more attention

The Schweizer Musikzeitung sees itself as a platform of the diverse Swiss music scene. (Graphics: Hubert Neidhart / SMZ)

For nearly 24 years the Schweizer Musikzeitung (Swiss Music Newspaper, SMZ) has been in circulation – a long time during which the media landscape has changed radically, keyword: internet. So you ask yourself: Why do we still need this newspaper which is still printed on newsprint paper nine times a year despite having an online presence? Or, to put the question differently: How would you argue that there is a necessity for this trade journal if it didn’t exist yet and you wanted to launch such a project?

Katrin Spelinova, who has been running the SMZ since 2007 as its editor-in-chief, does not hesitate for a moment: “We need a voice for music in Switzerland which is also heard outside the world of music.” She alludes to the fact that politicians wish that there was only once voice for all music associations.

Solid basis

The foundation of the SMZ does indeed have a link to the Federal Office of Culture (BAK). “In 1998, the BAK changed its strategy and cut financial contributions to the music associations”, explains Katrin Spelinova. “One argument was that the music associations should merge their magazines and newsletters.” That is how it was done. In the meantime, the SMZ has become an official notification channel for 12, even 30 music associations when you count the sub-organisations. SUISA is connected to SMZ as a partner and uses the publication channel in order to additionally disseminate its topics in connection with copyright in musical works and the cooperative society.

Katrin Spelinova highlights that the SMZ does not receive any subsidies from the BAK. “We used to be supported by Pro Helvetia, however, when we modernised our online appearance with the relaunch in 2013. Apart from that, our business is carried by the associations and advertising which is very important to us.” The type of financing by associations has remained the same since the relaunch in 2013. “It is a two-tier financing model. Associations require a side package which matches their needs, usually five, nine or 18 pages per year. The amount to be paid does not just depend on the number of these pages but also the number of the registered subscribers of association members.” In which case you need to add that the maximum price for such an annual association subscription only amounted to five Swiss Francs which just about covered the postage. “This income makes up 25-30% of our total income, the remainder stems from advertising and normal subscriptions which cost CHF 70.00” The main share of the roughly 18,500 subscriptions (WEMF 2021) goes to the associations.

Roughly 16 to 20 pages of the associations per issue which are aptly referred to as “basis” are no handicap for the credibility of the SMZ. On the one hand, they are clearly separated from the cover parts by the editors. On the other hand, they do not just contain the usually rather dry association news but also gripping articles such as about tradition and the importance of music reviews (issue 5/2021) or the adorably describe “Don Juan stupor: Russian pianists – gendering not necessary and the paraphrasing about Mozart operas by Liszt” (issue 6/2021).

Schweizer Musikzeitung: Katrin Spelinova

Katrin Spelinova, Editor-in-chief of the SMZ since 2007. (Photo: SMZ)

Katrin Spelinova also points out: “In the cover parts produced by the editors, we are trying to remain as neutral as possible.” The cover parts are split in a self-explanatory manner into “focus”, “reviews”, “resonance”, “campus” and “service”. The filet piece of the printed issue is the theme focus (“focus”) which is not published online. Here, you can read several in-depth texts on the topics such as “Hausmusik”, “wallet”, “voice”, “animas”, pause”, “Corona”, “supporting characters”.

Content without any style boundaries

What is central to the content is the alignment with the target group. Katrin Spelinova: “With this, we clearly refer to the active musicians whether professionals or amateurs, whether from orchestras or bands, including teachers and parents of music students, also people who are generally interested in music.” What’s decisive for picking the topics is that the Schweizer Musikzeitung is meant to be the platform for the Swiss Music Scene. “We report on everything which affects the music in Switzerland, whether that be education, performances, sound recordings or the life of music creators, and not just the life of stars which is already covered in other media types.” We would like our readers to be able look behind the scenes and to receive impulses to think about music in a rather general manner.”

In the last few years, the stylistic spectrum and therefore also the target group were increasingly expanded towards jazz and pop/rock. Katrin Spelinova wants to stick to this expansion. “It is also an experience of the music schools that you cannot make any progress with pigeonholing, i.e. to categorise into classical music, jazz, pop/rock, world music etc. And that is not least because the styles are merging.” This distinction is still made online in order to simplify access. “I do hope that this way of pigeonholing will cease to exist one day and that we will simply talk and write about music and what is associated with it.”

Katrin Spelinova does, however, confirm the impression that the SMZ is well-known in the classical music creation sector but much less so in the pop/rock and jazz sectors, despite editorial efforts with stories from these areas. She is still optimistic: “Due to the merger between the Schweizer Tonkünstlerverein [Swiss Sound Artist Association] with the Verein Musikschaffende Schweiz [Association Music Creators Switzerland], we now have more readers from that sector and expect that this is going to continue to increase.”

The newspaper format and the relatively plain and dry layout are a handicap with the younger readers who are mainly active on the internet and are used to a more attractive and colourful design. Katrin Spelinova is aware of that. “This is surely an issue which we must consider more and more in order to attract the attention of the students at music universities to the SMZ. We attempt to be present on social media channels such as Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. But if such a presence is really meant to convince, it requires an enormous effort.”

Print despite online presence

The question still remains why the SMZ still issues a printed edition despite enhanced online presence, is this not somewhat anachronistic? Katrin Spelinova emphasizes that you can also subscribe to the SMZ as an e-paper but this share was very small and amounted to less than a percent of the readers. “It is absolutely important that this newspaper gets delivered to the letterboxes so that readers are reminded nine times a year what their association is doing for them. With our enhanced cover section they also have the opportunity to read something about aspects which they would not actively look for on the internet because it is not even on their radar.” Add to that a business-related reason: “We cannot finance ourselves online. Advertising business still mainly runs via the print issue.”

Schweizer Musikzeitung: print paper

The SMZ is still printed nine times a year on newsprint paper in addition to having an enhanced online presence. (Photo: Pia Schwab / SMZ)

As such you could ask yourself how the online and print versions differ from each other. Katrin Spelinova: “Since we only publish nine times a year, we can provide a current report in the summer break online, which would be too late in the next print issue in September. And what is also very important is that we can place teasers into the hardcopy for longer texts which no longer find space in it and then refer the readers with a QR code to the integral online version. This creates more room to manoeuvre for us.”

The chat page in the printed part where two personalities exchange their view on a topic is rather interesting. This is something with particular online potential. It could nudge discussions with an expansion of the chat as a presented online discussion platform which regularly presents a topic that is discussed by experts in a controversial manner and then could be discussed further by the readers. Katrin Spelinova also sees a chance here. “We have relatively little direct feedback, also not via the commentary function. Last year, on the occasion of the Beethoven anniversary, we presented a work each week and asked the readers to tell us their relationship to or their experience with said composition. But only very little happened, we could not feel much from our readers.”

Bridge function between languages and regions

Thanks to the online presence the news really is news. Here, the quality of the SMZ shows itself by a careful selection such as with notes on insights from music research. Katrin Spelinova mainly looks after the matters affecting the associations and is very well supported by Wolfgang Böhler who many people might still know from the online magazine “Codex flores”. “He has a very good overview over what’s happening in the cultural political arena in the cantons and the municipalities.” Add to that the news from Jean-Daniel Humair who looks after the French part of the SMZ in Lausanne; Pia Schwab also contributes as part of the editorial team. “But it is a capacity problem to look after the French part as extensively as the German part.”

Italian texts are therefore a huge exception even though the exchange between the regions and languages is held high. “We try it, because the bridge function of the SMZ is important. You must not forget: For music creators from the Ticino, it can be more interesting if a report about them is written in German so that they draw more attention in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. We therefore have reported about the Ticino as a peripheral region, this year, we will focus on the Jura, next year about Grisons.”

What would be desirable is to feature more reviews which are important for music creators according to Katrin Spelinova. “What’s decisive for us is that the CDs have a link to Switzerland and are not from superstars which are already present everywhere else. In addition, concert reviews should, if possible, reflect a flow or a phenomenon in several examples. Specifically in one of the last issues there was a text on nine string quartets of Swiss composers who were performed within two weeks in Brunnen and in Zurich. As such you can also convey a context which contributes more than a pure concert review.”

Music associations involved:
Eidgenössischer Orchesterverband (EOV), Forum Musik Diversität (FMD), Konferenz Musikhochschulen Schweiz (KMHS), Musikhochschule Kalaidos, Schweizerischer Jugendmusikwettbewerb & Arosa Kultur (SJMW), Schweizerische Musikforschende Gesellschaft (SMG), Schweizerische Gesellschaft für Musik-Medizin (SMM), Schweizerischer Musikpädagogischer Verband (SMPV), Schweizer Musikrat & CHorama (SMR), Schweizerischer Musikerverband (SMV), SONART – Musikschaffende Schweiz, Genossenschaft der Urheber und Verleger von Musik (SUISA) und der Verband Musikschulen Schweiz (VMS).

Subscriptions

Surprising, fresh and always setting the tone: The Schweizer Musikzeitung can be acquired as a printed edition 9x a year delivered to your letterbox or as an e-paper. The latter is delivered as a pdf by e-mail or can be downloaded in the print archive.

The subscriptions include access to the digital print archive (Articles since 1998).

Annual subscription or e-paper, 9 issues: CHF 70.00
Annual subscription for students with valid credentials: CHF 35.00
Trial subscription (3 issues): CHF 20.00
Trial subscription (3 issue) for students with valid credentials: CHF 10.00

Order via e-mail: abo.schweizer-musikzeitung (at) galledia.ch
Order by phone: +41 (0)58 344 95 50
Order via online form: www.musikzeitung.ch/de/abonnieren
(Text: SMZ)

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All comments will be moderated. This may take some time and we reserve the right not to publish comments that contradict the conditions of use.

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The Schweizer Musikzeitung is so much more than a mouthpiece for Swiss music associations. It has grown to become an inspiring platform where you can find reports on musical topics across genres, languages and regions. Text by guest author Markus Ganz

Schweizer Musikzeitung: An inconspicuous medium which deserves more attention

The Schweizer Musikzeitung sees itself as a platform of the diverse Swiss music scene. (Graphics: Hubert Neidhart / SMZ)

For nearly 24 years the Schweizer Musikzeitung (Swiss Music Newspaper, SMZ) has been in circulation – a long time during which the media landscape has changed radically, keyword: internet. So you ask yourself: Why do we still need this newspaper which is still printed on newsprint paper nine times a year despite having an online presence? Or, to put the question differently: How would you argue that there is a necessity for this...read more

SUISA and the Covid-19 crisis

Since the end of February 2020, it’s not just the music sector that has been confronted with an unforeseen challenge. As a cooperative society for authors and publishers of music and a collective management organisation, how is SUISA dealing with the Covid-19 crisis which has been around for nearly two years? Text by Andreas Wegelin

SUISA and the Covid-19 crisis

With the bans for public performances, many people in the music sector had neither work nor income overnight. SUISA kept its business and its services up and running during the Covid-19 crisis for its members and its customers. (Photo: Jirsak / Shutterstock.com)

At the gala for the 13th Swiss Music Awards on 28 February 2020, of all things, the Swiss-wide restrictions of events with music kicked in. That evening, only a maximum of 1,000 people were permitted to attend the live event. Those who believed that the Covid-19 pandemic would have disappeared with the cold winter air, just like a flu virus, were soon proved wrong: From 13 March 2020, no live concerts, no parties in clubs were allowed any longer. The music business, made up of composers, performing artists, event organisers and suppliers for the event sector was forcibly deprived of its existential basis.

Meanwhile, we find ourselves in the second Covid-19 year and have been experiencing enormous difficulties when it comes to holding music events with a physical audience. How is SUISA as a cooperative society for authors and publishers of music and as a collective management organisation dealing with that?

Financial losses and unpredictability

About a month after the first lockdown had been ordered, the Executive Committee and Board of Directors of SUISA revised the budget for 2020. This so-called “Covid-19 budget” target which forecast 23% less in terms of collections and 8.5% more in terms of costs, could be met. As the annual accounts finally showed, the overall turnover losses were fortunately limited: The collections of SUISA in Switzerland and from abroad amounted to CHF 138.5m in 2020 which was 12% less than the previous record year (CHF 155.2m). Costs rose by only 1.1% compared to the previous year and therefore less dramatically as anticipated in the Covid-19 budget.

The drastic effects of the Covid-19 ordinances only become apparent when you look at the sectors individually: The decrease of the collections from concerts (–51%), entertainment events (–47%), the hospitality industry (–46%) and cinemas (–58%) is blatant compared to the 2019 results. The good results achieved for broadcasting rights, compensation claims and online usages partially offset these losses. However, rights owners whose income mainly stems from the success of live events had to face huge losses in terms of their distribution amounts.

Due to the second wave of the pandemic, all events were banned again in December 2020. Again, a Covid-19 budget had to be created where the expectations are lower yet again on the income side for the 2021 financial year: compared to 2020, 11% less. At the same time, savings of 11% in terms of costs should be achieved compared to the year before. Particularly with regard to the collections from concerts (tariff K), a further slump must be expected. The prognosis for the second Covid-19 year projects CHF 6m collections in this area. In 2020, this tariff generated CHF 11m and before the crisis in 2019, CHF 23m in remuneration for authors and publishers of music.

Two “buffers” help in this situation; they are expected to cushion the inclement framework conditions in the financial results as per the current status of the 2021 financial year: On the one hand, the situation regarding the securities investments is good. On the other hand, the money which could not be allocated to any rights owners during the last five years is used to cover costs. If possible it is paid out in the form of a supplementary distribution once this period has expired.

Relief measures for rights owners

Due to the effect of the pandemic, all collective management organisations in Europe decided to set up aid measures in favour of their rights holders. The aid measures launched by SUISA are based on three “columns”: First, advance payments on the distribution settlements with an extended payback period, second, contributions from the Covid-19 emergency fund which had been specially set up, and third and last, the emergency assistance for authors from the Pension Fund for Authors and Publishers (UVF).

These aid measures are gratefully received: Since the beginning of the Covid-19 crisis in March 2020, CHF 1,416,084 advance payments were made up to 25 October 2021. CHF 251,250 were awarded as contributions from the emergency fund and CHF 170,500 were granted as emergency assistance via the UVF fund. You can continue to submit applications via “My account”. Due to the high number of rights owners, the extent of the losses only become apparent when it comes to the distributions in the years 2021 or 2022 which will be much lower for many since the events in 2020 and 2021 could not be held. Publishing companies have the option to request advance payments or contributions from the Covid-19 emergency fund. The UVF fund emergency assistance is only possible to be granted to authors due to legal reasons.

Lobbying

Just like if you had a short circuit, the lights went out for the entire event sector regarding public performances. From one day to the next, performers, event organisers, stage technicians and other staff in the public event sector were without work and income. For authors the concert stoppage meant that their works were no longer performed live and therefore no licence fees were paid for the performance of their music any longer. The collections from live events slumped to their lowest ever as described further above. These copyright royalties are, however, an important basis for the existence of many rights owners.

The first aid measures by the Swiss Confederation were insufficient and also not really tailored to resolve the problems in the cultural sector. Lobbying therefore became rather important during the crisis. It has been and still continues to be paramount to persuade public authorities, parliaments and the government that culture is vitally important for society, just like shops for your daily needs. If, therefore, cultural performances may no longer take place due to event bans, the creatives, event organisers but also the publishers and suppliers affected must be compensated accordingly. What needs to be taken into account in such situations is that, particularly in the culture sector, many work as self-employed freelancers or in the form of small organisations, e.g. associations.

Furthermore, the understanding needs to be firmed up that there are different types of events: Studies show that there often is a lower risk of getting infected at cultural events than at large sports events or funfairs. Lobbyists have not yet managed to anchor this differentiation in the minds of the decision-makers so far. Nevertheless, the “Taskforce Culture” which had been spontaneously set up during the crisis, has achieved a lot and has become an important contact point for authorities, parliaments and the government. SUISA is a part of the extended support circle of the Taskforce.

Manage from a distance and work remotely

The Cooperative Society SUISA employs about 250 people. They share 187 full time positions. All staff whose tasks could be done by working remotely had to be sent home in the week of 16 to 23 March 2020. The IT team created the required plans for such a completely unexpected process from scratch and made sure that staff could continue to work from home on devices provided by the employer, without major difficulties.

Working in your home office, a recommendation issued by the authorities, later turned from being optional to mandatory. As such, it was not just a challenge it also entailed completely new experiences in terms of managing and organising the operations. How do you reach your co-workers and colleagues if you cannot simply pop over to the next office space if the meeting and break out rooms cannot be used?

The previously existing and used options to hold virtual meetings and one-to-one conversations via video conference were expanded. Thanks to these technical means the connection which is so important for a good collaboration between management and staff but also among colleagues could be maintained. Executive staff were trained in how to lead and manage their staff from home. Every two weeks, a web meeting with the Executive Committee, the HR manager and the IT manager took place, moderated by the communications manager. All staff could participate in this meeting and ask questions via the chat function. We thus managed to transition the collaboration “across the distance” into a daily work routine.

Business operations were functioning, thanks to the flexible, committed and disciplined staff as well as the advanced digitisation. SUISA was always available to its members and its customers. This new experience made the Executive Committee decided to also enable home office work in future, up to 50% of the work time. Home office deployments must, however, be coordinated within the teams and this cannot be carried out for some positions in the extent reflecting a maximum.

More self-service – process automation

The obligation to work from home particularly highlighted how indispensable and important digitisation has been for a collective management organisation like SUISA. Working from home is only possible if the necessary data is available electronically and extensive paper dossiers do not have to be accessed. The immense advantages in terms of availability of the required information was proven as a consequence of the digitisation of all member and customer files in the last few years. The developments in terms of computerisation further contributed that it was possible to quickly switch to working from home in a successful manner.

Customers and members of SUISA also benefited from progress for efficient and satisfying contacts with the company triggered by the digitisation. Due to the closure months for the hospitality industry and shops ordered by the authorities, many customers had requested a refund of the unusable licence for music performances. The process of refunding licence fees can now simply be triggered via a web form.

Since the middle of 2020, members can access the royalty report via “my account”. All members who have a valid online access can retrieve the up-to-date data for their works and the licences issued for them and view and arrange them according to selected criteria. More recently, the login process for members and customers was enhanced via a two-factor authentication which means that the digital business exchange with SUISA offers an even higher security standard. Further developments will follow.

The applications and digitisation projects mentioned above were only implemented in such a successful and timely manner because the staff continued to work on them at full steam and without any limitations during the pandemic. After some lengthy discussions, Executive Committee and Board of Directors had decided that SUISA would not apply for and introduce short-time work. A wise decision, as the situation which we have been experiencing since March 2020, shows more and more clearly: In a roundabout way under pressure from the authorities’ ordinances regarding the pandemic, SUISA was able to develop its services much further over the last few months. Despite the losses in collections, we are ready with digitised and automated processes to manage the music licences for event organisers and to distribute the royalties to rights owners reliably and, above all, cost-effectively.

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Since the end of February 2020, it’s not just the music sector that has been confronted with an unforeseen challenge. As a cooperative society for authors and publishers of music and a collective management organisation, how is SUISA dealing with the Covid-19 crisis which has been around for nearly two years? Text by Andreas Wegelin

SUISA and the Covid-19 crisis

With the bans for public performances, many people in the music sector had neither work nor income overnight. SUISA kept its business and its services up and running during the Covid-19 crisis for its members and its customers. (Photo: Jirsak / Shutterstock.com)

At the gala for the 13th Swiss Music Awards on 28 February 2020, of all things, the Swiss-wide restrictions of events with music kicked in. That evening, only a maximum of 1,000 people were permitted to...read more

Cla Nett: Passionate Blues musician, dedicated lawyer

On 27 September 2021, Cla Felice Nett, lawyer, musician and SUISA member since 1981 passed away after a long and severe illness. Obituary by guest author Marco Piazzalonga

Cla Nett: Passionate Blues musician, dedicated lawyer

Clat Nett was a regular visitor of the SUISA General Meeting; shown here during the 90th GM of the Cooperative Society in the Hotel Schweizerhof in Lucerne back in 2013. (Photo: Beat Felber)

Cla spent his early life in Engadine. Just before he started school, his family moved to Basel where his father began working as a teacher. After primary school, Cla went to a humanistic high school where he graduated with A levels type A (Latin and Greek). Following that, he completed law studies at the University of Basel where he acquired a “cum laude” licenciate.

Already as a teenager, Cla was a fan of the Blues, mainly self-taught how to play the guitar and started performing with his first bands. In 1975, he founded the Lazy Poker Blues Band with whom he was able to celebrate successful times in the 1980s and 1990s, both at home and abroad.

Cla and his formation played to an audience of 45,000 as representatives for Switzerland at the “Concert for Europe” in the Berlin Olympic Stadium, accompanied Joe Cocker for one month through Germany, toured the then GDR, recorded longplays in Chicago and played in clubs and at Open Airs all across our country.

Cla Nett managed to link music with his legal training. In the Board Committee and as President of the Expert Committee of Phonographic Producers at Swissperform and as Managing Director at the Swiss Performers’ Cooperative, SIG, he was able to contribute his know-how and experience. Cla also worked as an associate judge at the court of appeals in Basel.

Due to health-related reasons, Cla had been forced to take it easy over the last few years when it came to music and job. Even this year, in July, he practically fought his way out of bed to the stage of the Magic Blues Festival in the Valle Maggia in order to play with his Lazy Poker Blues Band one last time. Cla Nett leaves behind a wife, two adult children and one grandchild.

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On 27 September 2021, Cla Felice Nett, lawyer, musician and SUISA member since 1981 passed away after a long and severe illness. Obituary by guest author Marco Piazzalonga

Cla Nett: Passionate Blues musician, dedicated lawyer

Clat Nett was a regular visitor of the SUISA General Meeting; shown here during the 90th GM of the Cooperative Society in the Hotel Schweizerhof in Lucerne back in 2013. (Photo: Beat Felber)

Cla spent his early life in Engadine. Just before he started school, his family moved to Basel where his father began working as a teacher. After primary school, Cla went to a humanistic high school where he graduated with A levels type A (Latin and Greek). Following that, he completed law studies at the University of Basel where he acquired a “cum laude” licenciate.

Already as a teenager, Cla was a fan of...read more

“Techno and ländler music are very closely related to each other”

Electronically processed everyday sounds are combined with elements of ländler music to create a new listening experience: this is what the double bass player and composer, Pirmin Huber, wants to develop and realise for his new project. The “Get Going!” grant is supporting him with this project. Text/interview by guest author Rudolf Amstutz

Pirmin Huber: “Techno and ländler music are very closely related to each other”

The Schwyz composer and double bass player Pirmin Huber. (Photo: Arthur Häberli)

The Schwyz composer and double bass player, Pirmin Huber, has been experimenting with new ways of combining Swiss folk music with other genres to create new sounds since he completed his jazz studies (majoring in composition) at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts. Whether as a soloist or as a member of the “Ländlerorchester” (Ländler Orchestra), “Stereo Kulisse”, “Ambäck” or of the “Gläuffig” formation: Huber redefines folk music and blends it with techno, jazz, classical or electronic music. Now Pirmin Huber wants to conduct a type of “field recording” research with the help of electronically manipulated everyday noises and the folk music sounds of his double base and other instruments he plays. The whole thing should lead to a work that challenges our listening habits, thus reflecting the world at this extraordinary time.

Pirmin Huber, how did the idea for this project come about?
Pirmin Huber: I started out playing folk music, that is to say acoustic music, and I have increasingly delved into electronic music. By tinkering with new recording techniques, I have come up with ideas that I want to develop further. I grew up on a farm, and we also had a carpenter’s workshop there. I was as fascinated by the sounds of the saw as I was by all the other sounds, and I already tried to imitate them with my musical instruments at that time. In my “Get Going!” project, I start with the sounds I can create with my instruments, double bass, Schwyzerörgeli (an accordion first made in the canton of Schwyz), guitar, piano or Glarus zither, and combine them with typical everyday sounds that I make seem unfamiliar with the help of electronic music. Since my youth, I have been asking myself the following question: how can you make music from these sounds. Now I can afford quite a few tools, thus giving me the opportunity to get deeply involved with the project.

What comes first? The sound collection and then the composition or is it the other way around?
It’s a mixture of the two. New opportunities keep opening up while I work. It’s all part of the process. It’s important to me that I create a very specific mood with my music. The finished work will consist of several pieces that flow together or at least relate to each other. It could be described as a type of suite.

You shift from one style to the next with ease. As a double bass player, you always set the tone. Can connections or interfaces between folk music, classical music, jazz, pop, rock or techno be identified from this position?
Perhaps. In any case, techno and ländler music are very closely related genres. This may be difficult to understand from the outside (laughs), but the energy that comes from playing is the same for techno as it is for ländler music, which is after all also dance music. I think you first have to have played both to experience this common feature. In my project, I am trying to create a kind of modern ländler music with electronics and grooves.

Nature and urban life: do you get the inspiration you need from these conflicting elements?
I need both. As soon as one of them is no longer there, it feels like something is missing. That’s probably why it’s logical that I want to bring these two opposing poles together. I’ve had three strings to my bow for a long time: folk music, contemporary music and techno. However, I feel that they are one.

The “Get Going!” grant is intended to provide start-up financing without any result-related expectations. What do you think of this funding model?
I think it’s great! The freedom it gives us serves as motivation to really achieve something great. After all, I had conceived the idea for my project a long time ago, but then things kept getting in the way. And much ultimately depends on whether you can afford to execute such a project and also implement it without any stress. “Get Going!” allows me to do just that.

FONDATION SUISA started awarding new grants in 2018. Under the heading of “Get Going!”, creative and artistic processes that do not fall within established categories are given a financial jump-start. Each year, our Portrait Series profiles recipients of Get Going! funding.
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Electronically processed everyday sounds are combined with elements of ländler music to create a new listening experience: this is what the double bass player and composer, Pirmin Huber, wants to develop and realise for his new project. The “Get Going!” grant is supporting him with this project. Text/interview by guest author Rudolf Amstutz

Pirmin Huber: “Techno and ländler music are very closely related to each other”

The Schwyz composer and double bass player Pirmin Huber. (Photo: Arthur Häberli)

The Schwyz composer and double bass player, Pirmin Huber, has been experimenting with new ways of combining Swiss folk music with other genres to create new sounds since he completed his jazz studies (majoring in composition) at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts. Whether as a soloist or as a member of the “Ländlerorchester” (Ländler Orchestra), “Stereo Kulisse”, “Ambäck” or of the “Gläuffig” formation: Huber redefines...read more

Erika Hug: Committed and combative

SUISA and FONDATION SUISA are mourning Erika Hug. The publisher and entrepreneur had been influencing the promotion of Swiss music creation for more than three decades, on the SUISA Board of Directors, as a co-founder of FONDATION SUISA and as the president of the foundation board. She passed away unexpectedly on 14 July 2021 at the age of 76. Obituary by Andreas Wegelin and Urs Schnell

Erika Hug: Committed and combative

Erika Hug (1945-2021). (Photo: FONDATION SUISA / Musik Hug)

The Swiss music scene is mourning the loss of Erika Hug, publisher and owner of the established and traditional music business. She passed away completely unexpectedly on 14 July 2021.

Erika Hug had taken on leadership of the renowned Zurich music company as a young woman in the sixth generation. Apart from traditional publishing and sheet music business, the company grew well in the 1980s and entered the new sales business with CDs at an early stage. With her husband, German music entrepreneur Eckard Harke, the sales of music instruments also saw a strong development. One speciality were the two Steinway Piano Galleries in Lausanne and Zurich.

The profound changes in the music business in the course of internet digitisation led to a decline in demand for sheet music, sound recordings or instruments after the turn of the millennium. The Swiss-wide branch network was reduced at the start of the 2000s and the company was finally sold in 2017.

Contribution at SUISA and FONDATION SUISA

Over many years, Erika Hug had been giving her know-how and experience as an entrepreneur to the Cooperative Society, SUISA and the FONDATION SUISA by way of being a member of the SUISA Board of Directors and of the Pension Board of the FONDATION SUISA. From 1985 to 1995, Erika Hug was a Board member of the Cooperative Society SUISA and President of their committee for international relations.

Erika Hug was a founder member of the SUISA foundation for music (today: FONDATION SUISA) in 1989. For 27 years, until the end of 2015, she had been a member of the Foundation Board. From 1990 onwards, Erika Hug first presided the Finance Committee of the Foundation, from 1996 onwards, she became Vice President. Finally, from 2005 she led the Foundation for 10 years as President of the Foundation Board.

Erika Hug had been a major influence on the Cooperative Society and the Foundation over the last 30 years as a publisher and expert in the music business sector. She got involved when it came to access to music and to playing an instrument, especially also with respect to the younger generation and less well-off members of society. The project “make music in the classroom” of FONDATION SUISA is a proof for this. Erika Hug was also a fighter for more women in music and in business.

We mourn a great Swiss personality when it comes to bringing music to the people, and we are grateful for her commitment in the managing committees of our Cooperative Society and Foundation and would like to express our heartfelt condolences to her family.

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  1. Ho avuto il piacere di lavorare con Erika Hug per 14 anni nel Consiglio di fondazione della Fondazione Suisa per la musica e, di questa donna, ho sempre apprezzato la chiarezza d’intenti nel promuovere la musica “Made in Switzerland”, la tenacia e le brillanti idee.
    Un’altra sua qualità che ho sempre apprezzato in lei era la capacità di saper mettere a proprio agio le persone, di saperle ascoltare e, se le idee che venivano proposte le sembravano buone, di impegnarsi nella realizzazione senza mai risparmiarsi.
    Di lei serberò sicuramente un buon ricordo.
    R.I.P. Erika

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SUISA and FONDATION SUISA are mourning Erika Hug. The publisher and entrepreneur had been influencing the promotion of Swiss music creation for more than three decades, on the SUISA Board of Directors, as a co-founder of FONDATION SUISA and as the president of the foundation board. She passed away unexpectedly on 14 July 2021 at the age of 76. Obituary by Andreas Wegelin and Urs Schnell

Erika Hug: Committed and combative

Erika Hug (1945-2021). (Photo: FONDATION SUISA / Musik Hug)

The Swiss music scene is mourning the loss of Erika Hug, publisher and owner of the established and traditional music business. She passed away completely unexpectedly on 14 July 2021.

Erika Hug had taken on leadership of the renowned Zurich music company as a young woman in the sixth generation. Apart from traditional publishing and sheet music business, the...read more

SUISA Talks at the Zeiträume Festival Basel 2021

Enjoy ten days of contemporary music and experience how the works, often composed especially for the festival, play with their surroundings, ensnare them or engage with them in a kind of dispute. That is the quintessence of the biennial Zeiträume Festival Basel. Text by Erika Weibel

SUISA Talks at the Zeiträume Festival Basel 2021

Zeiträume Basel Festival pavilion in 2019. (Photo: Anna Katharina Scheidegger)

The fourth instalment of the biennial event for new music and architecture carries the festival title “Die Verwandlung” (‘the transformation’) and offers an extraordinary programme between 9 and 19 September 2021 with more than 20 productions and 20+ premières at more than 30 venues in Basel. Current focal points of urban development are made accessible and exciting new productions by many artists are played there.

Apart from numerous concerts and sound installations, you can also dive into the working environment of the composers during the festival. As such, many SUISA talks take place in the festival pavilion.

SUISA Talks, in the festival pavilion and at the Mittlere Brücke (‘Middle Bridge’)
Greifengasse 1, 4058 Basel
Admission free.

Saturday 4 September 2021
at 11:15, Eleni Ralli & Alexander Grebtschenko – Dialogues & Chimeras
at 13:15, Wanja Aloé – Vor Ort
at 15:15, Marianne Schuppe – Die Summe
at 17:15, Linus Riegger, Clemens Fiechter – Phase 4

Sunday 5 September 2021
at 11:15, Sibylle Hauert (tbc) – H.E.I. Kaserne
at 13:15, Dakota Wayne – Sonic Spaces im Klybeck
15:15 – 16:00, Ah Young Hong (soprano) & Vera Hiltbrunner (soprano) – Poppaea
at 17:15, Jannik Giger – Blind Audition

Tuesday 7 September 2021
at 17:15, Phoebe Bognar & Maria Muñoz – Sonic Spaces im Klybeck

Friday 10 September 2021
at 13:15, Dimitri de Perrot (tbc) – Niemandsland
at 17:15, Paul Brauner – Sonic Spaces im Klybeck

Saturday 11 September 2021
at 11:15, Hansjürgen Wäldele – Son et Lumière: Snurglond
at 13:15, Michael Hersch (composition) & Stephanie Fleischmann (libretto) – Poppaea
at 15:15, Klaus Lang – pflaumenblüten.
at 17:15, Helena Winkelmann – pflaumenblüten.

Sunday 12 September 2021
at 11:15, Eleni Ralli & Alexander Grebtschenko – Dialogues & Chimeras
at 13:15, tbc
at 15:15, Sebastian Mathias, Mila Pavicevic, Meret Kündig – Urban Creatures
at 17:15, Focus topic: IGNM Basel, with Marianne Schuppe & Xenia Fünfschilling

Friday 17 September 2021
at 11:15, Alfred Zimmerlin & Robert Torche – Grenzbahnhof
at 13:15, Michel Roth – Spiel Hölle
at 18:15, Yaron Deutsch (Ensemble Nikel) – Oratorium

Saturday 18 Septemer 2021
at 11:15, Focus topic: Zeitgenössische Musik Szene in Basel
at 13:15, Katharina Rosenberger – Urban Morphologies
at 15:15, Focus topic: Nachhaltiges Bauen

Throw a glance behind the scenes in an open conversation with composers, architects, artists and contributors of the festival.

The pavilion at the Mittlere Brücke is the centrepiece of the festival. This is where you can immerse yourself in the sounds, spaces and themes of the festival in talks, performances, installations as well as at the cocktail bar and meet the artists behind the festival productions in person.

The pavilion (Buol & Zünd), sustainably created with the support of SUISA and planned for multi-year use, will be staged again in a new, transformed form. In the middle of the city, the festival presents itself in an open, accessible and playful way – with numerous musical actions, a sounding cable car, kinetic sound objects and changing cocktails from 3 to 19 September.

Join us and be enchanted by a Basel reinterpreted for you.

www.zeitraeumebasel.com

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Enjoy ten days of contemporary music and experience how the works, often composed especially for the festival, play with their surroundings, ensnare them or engage with them in a kind of dispute. That is the quintessence of the biennial Zeiträume Festival Basel. Text by Erika Weibel

SUISA Talks at the Zeiträume Festival Basel 2021

Zeiträume Basel Festival pavilion in 2019. (Photo: Anna Katharina Scheidegger)

The fourth instalment of the biennial event for new music and architecture carries the festival title “Die Verwandlung” (‘the transformation’) and offers an extraordinary programme between 9 and 19 September 2021 with more than 20 productions and 20+ premières at more than 30 venues in Basel. Current focal points of urban development are made accessible and exciting new productions by many artists are played there.

Apart from numerous concerts and sound installations, you can also dive into the...read more

New login procedure for the “My Account” member portal

On 7 September 2021 SUISA is introducing a new login two-factor authentication procedure for the “My Account” member portal. This means that when you log in, you will need to enter an individually generated code in addition to your password. This procedure is designed to enhance the protection of your personal data and to enable you to manage your own account in future. This article describes what you have to do for continued access to your SUISA data. Text by Claudia Kempf

New login procedure for the “My Account” member portal

On 7 September 2021, SUISA will activate the new login process for the “My Account” member portal. (Photo: ArthurStock / Shutterstock.com, edited by Nina Müller)

Security is important to us. To ensure even stronger protection of your data, we are introducing a two-factor authentication process for “My Account”. This login procedure requires you to enter two different codes as unequivocal proof of identity to access your personal account.

In future, apart from your username and password, you need a code which will be generated each time you log in. This login procedure with two security factors – password and code – is called two-factor authentication. When dealing with sensitive data, it is especially worthwhile to have a second security step in addition to a secure password to safeguard the data against unauthorised access.

What possibilities does the new login process offer?

The enhanced security level will facilitate your future use of “My Account”. You can henceforth choose your own username and no longer need to log in with the “M number” (previously the fixed login number) assigned to you by SUISA.

Moreover, you can manage your own user account and grant an own access to third parties, e.g. your manager. You can also authorise their access to services, or restrict such access. You can decide, for example, to authorise a third party to view your works but not your settlement statements, or to permit them to register works on your behalf.

How will the change-over to the new login process work?

On 7 September 2021, we will activate the new login process. Existing logins will no longer be valid from this date. To continue to use “My Account” thereafter, please re-register after 7 September 2021 under www.suisa.ch/my-account. All existing “My Account” users will receive their new registration particulars for this purpose by post as of mid-August. These registration particulars are valid for 30 days and can only be used once.

How does the first login work?

First of all, you must open a new user account for yourself and select a username and password for that account. Then you can enter the registration particulars sent to you by post and activate your own personal “My Account” profile. Finally, as Administrator, you can open a user account for other persons and grant them access to your data.

Only the login procedure has been modified. None of your existing entries – e.g. particulars for the registration of works or works registrations that have already been filed – are affected by the change and you can continue to access them as before in your “My Account”.

Thanks to the two-factor authentication process, access to your data can be structured more flexibly. Moroever, the new process will enhance the security of “My Account” and we will consequently be able to extend our offer of online services for members.

For questions about registration and login, please refer to the following functions under www.suisa.ch/my-account:

  • Step-by-step instructions (PDF) will guide you through the login process.
  • Please check our help area for answers to the most common questions.
No access to “My Account” yet?
Order your registration particulars at: www.suisa.ch/my-account
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  1. Belinda Winiger says:

    Guten Tag

    Ich wollte eigentlich noch im alten Jahr die Lieder unseres Chores singspiration erfassen und bin jetzt böse überrascht worden. Wir haben nie per Post Informationen erhalten und ich kann mich nicht mehr anmelden. Jetzt habe ich versucht mich neu zu registrieren aber ich muss eine IPI Nummer eingeben, die ich nicht habe. Wie gehe ich jetzt am besten vor? Vielen Dank für Ihre Hilfe.

    Freundliche Grüsse
    Belinda Winiger (singspiration)

    • Guten Tag Frau Winiger

      Danke für Ihren Kommentar.
      Wegen der Umstellung des Login-Verfahrens muss sich jedes SUISA-Mitglied neu auf dem Mitgliederportal registrieren. Auch wenn man zuvor schon ein Login für «Mein Konto» besass, muss man trotzdem ein neues Benutzer/innenkonto für sich eröffnen. Auf der Website https://www.suisa.ch/mein-konto finden Sie Informationen und Links für den Zugriff auf das Mitgliederportal. Eine Bedienungsanleitung, die auch im obigen Blogbeitrag verlinkt ist, führt Sie Schritt für Schritt durch das Login-Verfahren. Während dem Anmeldeprozess kann man seine persönlichen Registrierungsangaben anfordern. «Mein Konto» ist ein Portal nur für die Mitglieder der SUISA. Jedes SUISA-Mitglied verfügt über eine persönliche IPI-Nummer. Sollten Sie diese Nummer vergessen haben oder Antworten auf andere Fragen zum Mitgliederportal auch nicht in den weiteren Hilfedokumenten finden, können Sie uns über die in der Bedienungsleitung ganz am Schluss aufgeführte E-Mail-Adresse eine Nachricht schicken.
      Freundliche Grüsse
      Manu Leuenberger, SUISA Kommunikation

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On 7 September 2021 SUISA is introducing a new login two-factor authentication procedure for the “My Account” member portal. This means that when you log in, you will need to enter an individually generated code in addition to your password. This procedure is designed to enhance the protection of your personal data and to enable you to manage your own account in future. This article describes what you have to do for continued access to your SUISA data. Text by Claudia Kempf

New login procedure for the “My Account” member portal

On 7 September 2021, SUISA will activate the new login process for the “My Account” member portal. (Photo: ArthurStock / Shutterstock.com, edited by Nina Müller)

Security is important to us. To ensure even stronger protection of your data, we are introducing a two-factor authentication process for “My Account”. This login procedure...read more